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iiU)' 3fe:B>'^'5.n \.C\'^\-e- 




I NDUSTRY y ^ \lKUlUGtSCE. . 

Toronto Public Library. 



Reference Department. 



THIS BOOK MUST NOT BE TAKEN OUT OF THE ROOM. 



MOV ? 1 1922 



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in 2010 with funding from 

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SESSIONAL PAPERS 



VOLUME 9 



FIRST SESSION OF THE FOURTEENTH PARLIAMENT 



A 



OF THE 



DOMINION OF CANADA 



SESSION 1922 




VOLUME LVIII 



^5\^<3 




MOV 9 1922 



12-13 George V Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers 



A. 1922 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX 

TO THE 

SESSIONAL PAPERS 

OF THE 

PARLIAMENT OF CANADA 



FIRST SESSION, FOURTEENTH PARLIAMENT, 1922 



A 

Agriculture Dept. — Annual Report, 1920- 

21 15- 

Agricultural Instruction Act — Annual Re- 
port 1920-21 15a 

Air Board — Annual Report 1921 141 

Air Force — Amendments to regulations. . 69 
Annuities Act — Transfer of administra- 
tion 441, 

Animals, health of — Compensation paid 117 
Armaments, Limitation of — Report of 
Washington Conference, 1921, and 

Treaties 47 

Armouries in Canada — Data 144 

Army Service Corps — Data 189 

Auditing of public accounts — Expendi- 
tures 214 

Auditor General — Annual Report 1920- 

21 1 

B 

Bankruptcy Act — Trustees District of 
Montreal 121 

Barristers, Supreme Court of N.S. — • 

Payments to 175, 175 a-b-c- 

Binder twine — Consumption in Canada, 

1921. . . 164 

Board of Hearing — Appeals to 155 

Bonds of railways guaranteed by pro- 
vinces 163 

Bonds and securities registered^State- 

ment 72 

Borden, Sir Robert — Appointment to Limi- 
tation of Armaments Conference. . . . 47a 

Buildings rented in Calgary for Govern- 
ment offices 134 

Buildings rented in Ottawa for Govern- 
ment Offices 103 

C 

Cabinet Ministers' trips to Europe — 
Cost, etc 169 

Caisse, J. J. — Employment in Montreal 

Post Olfice 114 

Canadian Expeditionary Force — ^lusical 
instruments 112th battalion.. .. 92 

43746^1 



Canadian Wheat Board — Memorandum re 76 
" " Legal opinion as 

to constitutionality 76a 

Canals of Canada — Data 161 

Canal statistics, 1921 20o 

Canadian Government Merchant Marine — 

Annual Report 1921 200 

Canadian National Railways — Annual 

Report, 1921 199 

Canadian National Railways — Passenger 

traffic, vicinity Moncton 133 

Canadian Northern bonds guaranteed by 

B.C. — Assumption by Dominion 208 

Caraquet and Gulf Shore Railway Co. — 

Purchase of 159, 159a 

Cattle embargo — Activities of Hon. M. 

Doherty 128 

Chief Architect's Branch, Dept. Public 

Works — Classification IIS 

Civil Service : 

Appointments in departments, 1911-22 

— Number 219 

Appointments, permanent, April 1, 1920, 

to January 6, 1922 139 

Bonus — Amounts paid to April 1, 1921 187 
Order in Council April 21, 1921 112 
Civil Service Act, 1918 — Positions ex- 
cluded under Sec 3Sb 102 

Civil Service Commission — Annual Re- 
port, 1921 32 

Civil Servants — Number on Jan. 1, 1912, 

and Jan. 1, 1922; amount salaries.. 204 
Civil Servants receiving $800 or $960 or 

less yearly 174 

Civil Service Insurance Act — Statement 

for 1921 58 

Superannuation and Retiring Allow- 
ances, 1921 57 

Coal importations from U.S. by Dominion 

Government, 1918-21 116 

Coal importations from U.S. 1896-1921.. 116a 
Cold storage warehouses — extension of 

subsidies 192 

Country elevators — Rules and regulations 45 
Covenant, League of Nations — Amend- 
ments to 181 

Criminal Statistics, year ended Sept. 30, 

1921 loii 

Customs and Excise — Annual Report. 

1920-21 n 

Customs and Excise Dept., Montreal — Em- 
ployees 168 

Customs collections. Parry Sound, Ont. . . 188 



12-13 George V Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers 



A. 1922 



D 

DeBeaux, Robert — Internment of 197 

Destructive Insect and Pest Act — Regula- 
tions under 94 

Doherty. Rt. Hon. C. J. — Amounts paid 

to 100 

Dominion Lands Act — Orders in Council 78 
Survey Act — Orders in 

Council 82 

Dry docks at Vancouver, etc. — Data.. .. 110 



Eastern LaHave Transpurlation Com- 
pany, Limited 

Editorial Committee — Annual Report 1921 

Elections, By, 1921 — Report 

Election. General, 1921 — Report 

Election officers — Tariffs of fees 

Electoral Officer. Chief — Report 

Estimates : — 

Main, 1922-23 

Supplementary, 1922-23 

.further, 1921-22 

Exchequer Court — Rules and Orders.. .. 

Experimental Farms — Report of Director, 
1920-21 • 

E.«ernal Affairs — Annual Report 1920-21 

Extra-territorality rights of the Dominion 



132 

75 

13a 

13 

US 

6G 



71 

93 

34 

127 



F 

Farms, greater production, Blackfoot In- 
dian Reserve.. .: 154 

Fort Edward, Windsor. N.S. — Lease of. . 95 

Forest Reserves and Parks Act — Orders 

in Council 79 

Fisheries, Dejit. of — Establishment as sep- 
arate department 99, 990 

Fisheries of B.C. — Cost of operation, etc. 180 

" " Transfer of control.. ISOa 

Fisheries of Quebec — Control of.. ..4 6, 4(ia 
Petition of A. 

Wick and others 122 

Fisheries Protection Service — Transfer of 

jurisdiction 44c 

Fisheries statistics, 1920 17o 



G 

Genoa Conference — Documents relating to 

1U5, 1U5(| 

Geographic Board of Canada — 17th Re- 
port 25!) 

Governor-General's Warrants- — Statement 52 

Grand Trunk Railway Company — $25,- 

000,000 loan, 1921 113 

Grand Trunk Railway strike, 1910 — 

Seniority rights of employees 172 

H 

Harbours of St. John, etc. — Expenditure 

on Ill 

Harbour improvements at Quebec, etc. — 

Expenditures on 97 

Health Uept. — Annual Report 1920-21.. 12 

Heath, Clyde, Tancook, N.S. — Trial and 

conviction of li>7 

Historical Publications Board — 4th An- 
nual Report 101 

Holland. Lee — Deportation of 130 

Hydrographic, Tidal, Current Surveys- 
Transfer of jurisdiction 44c 



I 

Income Tax Office, Montreal — Employees 140 

Indian Act — Enfranchist- ments under. ... 88 

Indian Affairs — Annual Report 1920-21.. 27 

Indian Agency, Bear River, N.S 183 

Imperial Government — ^.Advances to from 

declaration of war 215 

Immigrants — Placing of upon land in 

Provs. of -Man.. Sask.. Alta 99 

Immigration and Colonization — Annual 
Report 1920-21 18 

Intoxicants taken into N. W. Ts. under 

permit 86 

Insurance — Annual Report of Superin- 
tendent, 1920-21 8 

Insurance on C.N.R. and G.T.P.R. Com- 
panies — Placing of 124 

Internal Economy — Report of Commis- 
sioners, House t>f Commons, 1921-22 43 

Interior Department — Annual Rei)ori 

1920-21 . . - 26 

Inverness Railway and Coal Co. — Acqui- 
sition by Govt 107 

Inlernatitmai Labour Conference, Geneva, 
1921 — Draft Conventions and Recom- 
mendations 181b 

Investigators of Values — Appointments 

to London and Paris 186 



Junior County Court Judge. County Na- 
naimo, B.C 



Ivootenay Falls, B.C. — Reclamation of. . 
King's Court Bench, Sask. — Orders and 

Rules 



Labour Dept. — Annual Report 1920-21.. 

Land grants Prov. of Sask. as bonus to 
railways 

Lands sold by C.P.R. year ended Sept. 
30, 1921 

La'rkin, P. C. — Appointment as High Com- 
missioner 

League of Nations: — 

Amendments to Covenant 

International Labour Conference, 1921 
Reports of meeting, Geneva, 1921.. .. 

Librarians of Parliament — Report for 1921 

Library of Parliament — Annual supple- 
ment lo catalogue 

Lignite — Experiments in carbonizing, 
Bienfait, Sask 

Limitation of Armaments Conference, 
Washington, 1921 — Report and treaties 

Loan and Trust Companies — Report for 
1920 

Lot 225, Hudsim Bay Co.'s survey. Parish 
of St. John. Man 



M 



Bonaventure, 



P.Q.- 



Mail contract, 

Changing of 

Mail subsidies and Steamship subven- 
tions — Annual Report 1920-21 

Marine Hospitals Service — Financial 
statement 

Migratory Birds Convention Act — 
Orders in Council 



207 

218 
70 

37 

198 

84 

77 

181 

181b 

181(1 

42 

42a 

120 

47 

143 

216 



145 
loa 
74 
SO 



2 



12-1. 'J Georpc \' 



Alpluilx^tii'al Judex t^ iSossional Papers 



A. 192:3 



Jlilitia : — 

Appointments. Prnmotions. Retireitipnls Rl 

Army Pay Cnrps--Data 1 1>0 

Army Ser\'ice (.'orps — Data ISK 

Buildings occupied Ottawa, ete 100 

fJenerals. etc. — Nimiber. salaries. . . . 193 

General Orders. 6o 

Military districts — Numlier, staffs, sal- 
aries 194 

Permanent Force — Strength of 190 

Militia and Defence — Annual Report 1920- 

21 36 

Mineral claims. Yukon Ty. — Recording 

of loT 

Mineral output. Yukon Ty. — Royalty tax 
on 160 

Mines Department — Annual Report 1920- 

21 26 

Miscellaneous Unforeseen expenses — • 
Statement 54 

Montreal Dry Dock Co. — Leases with 

Govt 16.5. L6!ia 

Montreal HarbouJ- Commission — .Em- 
ployees 13S 

Multigraph machines in Government De- 
partments — Number, etc 170 



Mc 

McLachlan. J. B. — Communications be- 
tween Minister of Labour and 104 

McQuan-ie. John C. — Superannuation of 123 



N 

N'aval Service — Annual Report 1920-21.. 39 
Naval Service (Fiseries Branch) — Annual 

Report 1920 40 

Naval Service — Orders in Council.. 49. 49o. 496 
National Battlefields Commission — Finan- 
cial statement 61 

Natural resources of Western Provinces — 

Transfer of 142, 142a, 142ft. 142c 

Nautical assessors — mode of appoint- 
ment 206 

Newspaper censorship during war.. .. 131 
Northern Explosive Co. plant, Rigaud, 
P-Q 191 



O 

Officials, Government, in receipt higher 

salaries than deputy ministers 196 

Order of Grain Buyers — Respecting.. .. 209 

Ordinances of Yukon Ty., 1921 62 

under N.W.T.'s Act 85 

Ottawa Improvement Commission — .An- 
nual Report 1920-21 67 

P 

Page. H. W. A. — Claims of 205 

Park St. Charles Company, Limited — 

Documents 203 

Patent Commissioner — Annual Report 

1920-21 10/ 

"Pekin." Tug — Employment of 166 

Penitentiaries — Annual Report 1920-21.. 35 
Pension Commissioners — Annual Report 

1920-21 41 

Pensions paid. County Middlesex. 1921-22 217 
Persons from Poland, etc.. entering under 

bond to farm ■ 125 



Postmasters : — 

Constitvicnc\' r,\ssomption and Mont- 
calm- — Dismissals 177 

Constituency Uichmonrl and Wolfe — Ap- 
pointments J 78 

CN)nstitii<mcy Richmond and Wolfe — 

Dismissals 179 

Postmaster frpner.tl — Annual Report 

1920-21 24 

Post Offices : — 

Avignon. P.Q.^Transfer of 151 

Carleton, P. Q. — Transfer of 146 

Bonaventure. P.Q. — Transfer of.. .. 147 

Montreal. P.Q. — Employees 152 

Paspebiac. P.Q. — Transfer of 149 

St. Omer. P.Q. — Transferor 148 

Shigawake. P.Q. — Transfer of 150 

Proprietary or Patent Medicine Act — 

MemoraTidum re 73 

Pre-emptions in Alta. and Sask. sold to 

settlers 176 

Prime Ministers' Conference, London. 

Eng.. 1921 — Summary of Proceeding-s 48 . 

Purchasing Commission — Origin of goods 

purchased 195 

Public Service Act — Retirements under 96 

Public Service Act — Rearrangement and 

transfer of duties.. ..44, 44a, 44ft, 44c 

Public Accounts of Canada — -Annual Re- 
port 1920-21 2 

Public Printing and Stationer.v — Annual 

Report 1920-21 33 

Public Works — -Annual Report 1920-21.. 19 

Pulp and Paper Statistics, 1919 17 



Quebec Bridge — Conditions imposed upon 

railway companies 201 

Quebec Harbour — Terminal and wharf 
facilities lOS 

Quebec Harbour Commission — Corre- 
spondence with Minister of Marine and 
Fisheries 

Quebec, Oriental and Atlantic Railway — 
Merging with Canadian National.. .. 

Quebec and Western Railway — Merging 
with Canadian National 



Radiotelegraph Regulation No. 104 — 
Amendment to 

Radiotelegraph Service — Transfer of juris- 
diction 

Railways and Canal.s — Annual Report 
1920-21 

Railway Belt (40 mile). B.C. — Orders in 
Council 

Railwa.v Belt Water .Act — Orders in Coun- 
cil 

Railway Commissioners — .4nntial Report 
1921 

Railways — Payments to C.N.R., G.T.R.. 
etc 

Railway between New Glasgow and 
Thorburn. N.S 

Retirements under Public Service Act.. 

Returned Soldiers' Insurance — Statement 

Road projects in N.S. — Advances by Fed- 
eral Govt 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police — .Annual 
Report 1921 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police — Trans- 
fer of control 

Royal Society of Canada — Financial 
Statement 



129 
109 
109 

50 

44c 

20 

81 

S3 

20c 

137 

211 
96 
59 

210 

28 

44a 

60 



12-13 George V Alphabetical Index to iSessional Papers 



A. 1922 



s 

Sardines sold for export — Minimum price 171 
Srhool lands in Sask., etc. — Acres sold. 

etc 173 

Scientific and Industrial Research-:-Re- 

porl of Council, 1920-21 51 

Scientific and Industrial Research — Finan- 
cial statement 51a 

Secretary of State — Annual Report 1920- 

21 29 

Shareholders, chartered banks of Canada 106 

" Quebec Savings Banks .. 106o 

Shipbuilding industry — Endorsements or 

liabilities 5G 

Shipping (Navigation and Shipping) — 

Annual Report 1920-21 lln 

Shipping. I>ist of — Annual Report 1921.. 22 
Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment — Annual 

Report 1920-21 14 

Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment — Expendi- 
tures of Dept., 1921 115 

Soldiers established on land in different 

provinces 119 

Soldier Settlement Act — Regulations 

under 87 

Soldier Settlement Board — Annual Report 

1921 90 

Sore! shipyards — Dismissals since Dec. 

29. 1921 135 

Stallion Clubs, etc. — Premiums or bonuses 

paid 126 

Steamboat Inspection — Annual Report 

1920-21 23 

St. Lawrence River Waterway — 

Correspondence between Canada and 

U.S •• SHrr 

Reports and correspondence SO/ 

Report of International Joint Commis- 
sion 8 3 

Reports of New York State Commission 

in opposition 89I>, 89c, 89(i, S9e 

Superannuation and Retiring Allowances, 

Civil Service, 1921 07 

T 

Taylor. James — Appointment Asst. Supt. 

Montreal Post Office IS^S 

Tobacco Experimental Station, I'Assomp- 

tion, P.Q ^^* 

Temporary Loans — Statement 55 



Timber on Indian lands. Tp. Laird. Dist. 
Algoma 153 

Timber on Crown lands. Western Pro- 
vinces — Licenses for 162 

Tolls and Duties — Remissions and refunds 91 

Topographical Surveys Branch— Annual 

Report 1920-21 lOb 

Toronto Harbour — Expenditures on 1912- 

21 13G 

Trade and Commerce — Annual Report 

1920-21 ID 

Trade Commissioners, Canadian — List of 156 

Trade of Canada (Imports and Exports) 

— Annual Report 1920-21 106 

Trade (reciprocal) with Australia — Corre- 
spondence 65 

Treasury Board over-rulings — Statement 53 

Treaties of Peace:: — 

Allies and Associated Powers and Hun- 
gary. 1920 212 

Allies and Associated Powers and 
Turkey, 1920 213 

U 

Unclaimed balances, Canadian chartered 

banks 106b 

Unclaimed balances, Quebec Savings 

banks 106a 

Union Station at Palais. Quebec, P.Q. — 
Construction and use 202 

V 

Valley Railway. N B. — Terms of opera- 
tion 163 

W 

Weights. Measures. Electricity. Gas Ser 

vices— Annual Report 1920-21 lOe 

Winnipeg strike — Correspondence with 

A. J. Andrews 138. 138o. 138c 

Winnipeg strike — Correspondence with 

General Kitchen 13S6 

Y 

Young. Gurney, Tancook. N.S. — Trial and 
conviction of 1^' 



12-13 George V List of Sessional Papers A. 1922 



LIST OF SESSIONAL PAPERS 

Arranged in Numerical Order, with their titles at full length; the dates when Ordered 
and when presented to the Houses of Parliament; the Names of the Senator or 
Memher who moved for each Sessional Paper, and whether it is ordered to be 
Printed or not Printed. Also those printed hut not presented. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 1 

(This volume is hound in two parts). 

1. Report ot the Auditor General for the year ended March 31. 1921, Volume I, Parts a-b — A 
to J. Presented March 13, 1922 Pnntcd for distribution and sessional papers. 

Report of the Auditor General for the year ending 31st March, 1921, Volume II, Parts K 
to SS. Presented March 13, 1922 Printed lor distribution and sessional papers. 

Report of the Auditor General for the year ended March 31, 1921, Volume III, Parts T 
to ZZ. Presented March 13, 1922 Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 2 

(This vgoluvie is bound in two parts.) 
Z. Public Accounts of Canada for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1921. Presented 
March 13, 1922 Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

3. Estimates of sums required for the service of the Dominion for the year ending on the 

31st March, 1923. J»resented March 24, 1922. 

Printed for distribution aud sessional papers. 

4. Supplementary Estimates of sums required for the service of the Dominion for the year 

ending on the 31st March, 1923. Presented June 23, 1922. 

Printed for distribiUion and sessional papers. 

5. Further Supplementary Estimates of sums required for the service of the Dominion for 

the year ended on the 31st March, 1922. Presented April 27, 1922. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

8. Report of the Superintendent of Insurance of the Dominion of Canada for the year ended 
31st December, 1921 — Volume I, Insurance Companies other than Life ; Volume II, 
Life Insurance Companies. Not presented. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

10. Twenty-ninth Annual Report of the Department of Trade and Commerce for the fiscal 
year ending March 31, 1921. Presented March 9, 1922. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

10" Report relating to Mail Subsidies and Steamship Subventions for the fiscal year ending 
March 31, 1921, with traffic returns, etc., to December 31, 1921. Presented April 28, 
1922 Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 3 

106 Annual Report of the Trade of Canada (Imports for Consumption and Exports), for the 
fiscal year ended March 31. 1921. Presented April 11, 1922. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 4 

lO'i Criminal Statistics for the year ended September 30, 1921. Not presented. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

lOe. Annual Report of the Weights and Measures, Electricity and Gas Inspection Services of the 
Department of Trade and Commerce for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1921. Pre- 
sented March 10. 1922 Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

5 
43746—2 



12-13 George V List of Sessional Papers A. 1922 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 4r— Concluded. 

10/ Report of the Commissioner of Patents for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1921. Pre- 
sented March 10, 1922 Printed for di^tiHbution and sessional papers. 

11. Report of the Department of Customs and Excise, containing accounts of revenue with 
statements relative to the Imports, Exports, and Excise of the Dominion of Canada, 
for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1921. Presented March 23, 1922. 

Pi-inted for distribution and sessional papers. 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 5 

lla Shipping Report of the Department of Customs and Excise, containing the Statements of 
Navigation and shipping of the Dominion of Canada for the fiscal year ended March 
31, 1921. Presented March 23, 1922. . . .Pnn(e<J for distribution and sessional papers. 

12. Report of the Department of Health for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1921. Pre- 

sented March 17, 1922 Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

13. Report of the Chief Electoral Officer on the Fourteenth General Election for the House 

of Commons of Canada, 1921. Presented April 28, 1922. 

Pi-^nted for distribution and sessio^ial papers. 

13o. Report of By-Elections for the House of Commons of Canada, held during the year 
1921. Presented April 10, 1922 Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

14. Report of the work of the Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment for the calen- 

dar year ended December 31, 1921. Presented March 24, 1922. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers 

15. Report of the Minister of Agriculture for the Dominion of Canada, for the year ending 

March 31, 1921. Presented March 10, 1922. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

15o Report on "The Agricultural Instruction Act," for the fiscal year 1920-21. Presented 
March 31, 1922 Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

17. Pulp and Paper statistics, 1919 — Dominion Bureau of Statistics. Not presented. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 6 

17o Fisheries statistics, 1920 — Dominion Bureau of Statistics. Not presented. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

18. Report of the Department of Immigration and Colonization, for the fiscal year ended 

March 31, 1921. Presented March 23, 1922. 

Printed for distribution and sessiotial papers. 

19. Report of the Minister of Public Works on the works under his control for the fiscal 

year ended March 31, 1921. Presented March 13, 1922. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

20. Annual Report of the Department of Railways and Canals, for the fiscal year from April 

1, 1920, to March 31, 1921. Presented March 17, 1922. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

20<i Canal Statistics for the year ending December 31, 1921. Not presented. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

20c Seventeenth Report of the Board of Railway Commissioners for Canada, for the year 
ending December 31, 1921. Manuscript. Presented March 31, 1922. 

Printed for distribtition and sessional papers. 

21. Fifty-fourth Annual Report of the Department of Marine and Fisheries, for the fiscal 

year 1920-21 — Marine. Presented March 10, 1922. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 7 

22. List of Shipping, issued by the Department of Marine and Fisheries, being a list of 

vessels on the registry books of the Dominion of Canada, on the 31st December, 1921. 
Not presented Printed for disti'ihution and sessional papers. 

6 



12-13 George V List of Sessional Papers A. 1922 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 1— Concluded. 

23. Supplement to the Fifty-fourth Annual Report of the Department ot Marine and Fish- 

eries for the fiscal year 1920-21 (Marine) — Steamboat Inspection Report. Not pre- 
sented Printed jor distribution and sessional papers. 

24. Report of the Postmaster General for the year ended March 31, 1921. Presented March 

10, 1922 Printed for distribution and sessional papers 

25. Annual Report of the Department of the Interior, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 

1921. Presented March 23, 1922 Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

25a Annual Report of the Topogrraphical Surveys Branch, Department of the Interior, year 
1920-21. Not presented Printed for distribution atid sessional papers. 

256 Seventeenth Report of the Geographic Board of Canada, containing all decisions from 
April 1, 1919, to March 31, 1921. Not presented. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

26. Report of the Department of Mines, for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1921. Presented 

March 23, 1922 Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 8 

27. -\nnual Report of the Department of Indian Affairs for the year ended March 31, 1921. 

Presented March 23, 1922 Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

28. Report of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police for the year ended September 30. 1921. 

Presented March 13, 1922 Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

29. Report of the Secretary of State of Canada for the year ending March 31, 1921. Pre- 

sented March 13, 1922 Printed for distribution and sessional papers 

32. Thirteenth Annual Report of the Civil Service Commission of Canada for the year 1921. 

Presented June 19, 1922 Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 9 

33. Annual Report of the Department of Public Printing and Stationery for the fiscal year 

ended March 31, 1921. Presented March 20, 1922. 

Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

34. Report of the Secretary of State for External Affairs for the year ending March 31, 

1921. Presented March 10, 1922 Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

35. Report of the Superintendent of Penitentiaries for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1921. 

Presented March 14, 1922 Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

36. Report of the Department of Militia and Defence, Canada, for the fiscal year ending ' 

March 31, 1921. Presented March 13, 1922. 

Printed for distribution and sessiovral papers. 

37. Report of the Department of Labour for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1921. Pre- 

sented March 20, 1922 Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

39. Report of the Department of the Naval Service for the fiscal year ended March 31, 

1921. Presented March 13, 1922 Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

40. Fifty-fourth Annual Report of the Fisheries Branch of the Department of the Naval 

Service, 1920. Not presented Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

41. Report of the Board of Pension Commissioners tor Canada, for the year ending March 

31, 1921. Presented March 13, 1922 Printed for distribution and sessional papers. 

42. Report of the Joint Librarians of Parliament, for 1921, Presented March 10, 1922. 

Not printed. 

42" Copy of Annual Supplement to the Catalogue of the Library of Parliament: Classified 
list of all books and pamphlets added to the Library from January 1, 1921, to Decem- 
ber 31, 1921. Presented March 15, 1922 Not printed. 

43. Report of the proceedings of the Commissioners of Internal Economy of the House of 

Commons for 1921-22. Presented March 9, 1922 Not printed. 

44. Ci'pies of Orders in Council passed under the provisions of Chapter 6, 8-9 George V, 

"An Act to authorize Rearrangements and Transfers of duties In the Public Service." 
Presented March 9, 1922 Not printed. 

7 

43746 — 2J 



12-13 George V List of Sessional Papers A. 192:2 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 9— Continued. 

44a Copy ot Order in Council, P.O. 923. dated 26th April. 1922. transferring the control and 
administration of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police from the Minister of Militia and 
Defence to the Minister of Justice, under the provisions ot Chapter VI, S-9 George V. 
Presented May 2, 1922 .Vof printed. 

446 Copy of Order in Council, P.C. 957, dated May 3, 1922, transferring the administration 
of The Government Annuities Act to the Minister of Labour. Presented May 4. 1922. 

Xot printed. 

44c Copy ot Order in Council. P.C. 1246. dated June 14, 1922, authorizing the transfer of 
the Radiotelegraph Service, Hydrographic Survey, Tidal and Current Survey and 
Fisheries Protection Service, from the jurisdiction of the Minister of the Naval Service 
to the Minister of Marine and Fisheries. Presented June 27, 1922 Kot printed. 

45. Copy of Rules and Regulations of the Board of Grain Commissioners in respect to 

Country Elevators. Presented March 9, 1922 yot printed. 

46. Copy of Orders in Council, P.C. 360, dated 13th February, 1922, authorizing the Minister 

of Marine and Fisheries to undertake the administration of the fisheries in the tidal 
and navigable waters of Quebec that are accessible by way of navigation from the 
sea. Presented March 9, 1922 Xot printed. 

46a Return to an Order of the House of the 3rd April, 1922, for a copy of the correspondence 
and all other documents regarding the transfer of fisheries to the Province of Quebec. 
Presented April 19, 1922. Hon. Mr. Marcil (Bonaventure) Not printed. 

47. Copy of Report of the Canadian delegate to the Conference on the Limitation of Arma- 

ments held at Washington. November 12, 1921. to February 6, 1922, including Treaties 
and 'Resolutions. Presented March 9 and April 3, 1922. 

Printed for bound sessional papers and distributed to Senators and Members. 

VJa Return to an Address to His Excellency the Governor General of the 24th March. 1922, 
for a copy of all letters, telegrams, correspondence and other documents exchanged 
between the Imperial Government and the Government of Canada, and all corre- 
spondence passing between officers of the Government of Canada and Sir Robert 
Borden, concerning the appointment of Sir Robert Borden as Canadian representative 
at the International Conference for the limitation of armaments at Washington. Also 
a copy of any Orders in Council in this connection. Presented May 1, 1922. Mr. 
Casgrain Not printed. 

48. Report of the Conference of Prime Ministers and Representatives of the United King- 

dom. The Dominions, and India, held in London, England. In June, July, and August. 
1921 — Summary of Proceedings and Documents. Presented March 9. 1922. 

Xot printed. 

49. Orders in Council in respect to the Naval Service as follows: P.C. 2112. dated the 20th 

June, 1921, re entry of Stewards and Cooks. P.C. 2155, dated the 17th August, 1921, 
re allowance to Writer ratings who have qualified in Shorthand. P.C. 3625. dated the 
17th October 1921. re extra pay for engineroom ratings and cook ratings whilst on 
ships in tropics. Presented March 13, 1922 Not printed. 

49a Order in Council, P.C. 436, March 21, 1922, terras under which officers of Royal Navy 
may be loaned to the Royal Canadian Navy. Presented March 30, 1922. 

Xot printed. 

49b Copy of Order in Council, P.C. 1189, dated June 5, 1922, authorizing regulations govern- 
ing the retirement and discharge of officers and men to promote economy in the Naval 
Service. Presented June S, 1922 Not printed. 

50. Amendment to Radiotelegraph Regulation, No. 104. Presented March 13, 1922. 

Xot printed. 

51. Report of the administrative chairman of the Honorary Advisory Council for Scientific 

and Industrial Research of Canada, for the year ending March 31, 1921. Presented 
March 13, 1922 Xot printed. 

51a Financial Statement of the Honorary Advisory Council for Scientific and Industrial 
Research of Canada, for the year ended March 31, 1921. Presented March 22. 1922. 

Xot printed. 

52 Statement of Governor General's Warrants issued since the last session of Parliament on 
account of 1921-22. Presented March 13, 1922 Xot printed. 

53. Statement of Treasury Board over-rulings, under Section 44, Consolidated Revenue 

and Audit Act. Presented March 13, 1922 Xot printed. 

54. Statement of Expenditure on account of "Miscellaneous Unforeseen Expenses," from 

the 1st April. 1921, to the 8th March, 1922, in accordance with the Appropriation Act 
1921-22. Presented March 13, 1922 Not printed. 

8 



12-13 George V List of Sessional Papers A. 1922 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 9— Continued. 

55. Statement o£ Temporary Loans under Chapter 24, Section 13, R.S. (Consolidated 

Revenue and Audit Act). Presented March 13, 1922 Not printed. 

56. Statement of endorsements made or liabilities incurred under the provisions of Chapter 

70, 10-11 Geo. V, An Act respecting the Shipbuilding Industry. Presented March 13, 
1922 Not printed. 

57. Statement of Superannuation and Retiring Allowances in the Civil Service during the 

year ended 31st December, 1921, under Chap. 17, R.S.C., showing name, rank, salary, 
age, service allowance and cause of retirement of each person superannuated or 
retired, also whether the vacancy has been filled by promotion, or by appointment, 
and the salary of any new appointee. Presented Marcli 13, 1922 Not printed. 

58. Statement in pursuance of Section 17 of the Civil Service Insurance Act, for the year 

ending March 31, 1921. Presented March 13, 1922 Not printed. 

59. Statement of Returned Soldiers' Insurance for period from September 1, 1920, to March 

31, 1921. Presented March 13, 1922 Not printed. 

60. Statement of the Receipts and Expenditures of the Royal Society of Canada, for the 

year ended April 30, 1921. Presented March 13, 1922 Not printed. 

61. Statement of Receipts and Expenditures of the National Battlefields Commission for 

the year ended 3l3t March, 1921. Presented March 13, 1922 Not pi-inted. 

62. Ordinances of the Tukon Territory passed by the Yukon Council (First and Second 

Sessions), in the year 1921. Presented March 13, 1922 Not printed. 

63. Copies of General Orders promulgated to the Militia for the period between February 1, 

1921, and January 1, 1922. Presented March 13, 1922 Not printed. 

64. Appointments, Promotions and Retirements, Canadian Militia and Canadian Expedi- 

tionary Force, from February S, 1921, to November 17, 1921. Presented March 13, 1922. 

Not printed. 

65. Copy of correspondence between the late Government of Canada and the Government ot 

Australia with respect to reciprocal trade with Australia. Presented March 13, 1922. 

Not printed. 

66. Report of the Chief Electoral Officer as required by Section 74 of the Dominion Elec- 

tions Act, as of date March 1, 1922. Presented March 14, 1922. 

Printed for distribution to Senators and Members. 

67. Report of the Ottawa Improvement Commission for the fiscal year ended March 31, 

1921. Presented March 14, 1922 Not printed. 

68. Copies of Orders in Council Nos. P.C. 578, P.C. 579, P.C. 2507, P.C. 2508, P.C. 3979f 

P.C. 3980 and P.C. 4725, approving tariffs of fees of elections officers under section 76 
of the Dominion Elections Act. Presented March 14, 1922 Not printed. 

69. Amendments to Regulations for the Canadian Air Force, approved by the Governor in 

Council under Section 5 of the Air Board Act, 9-10, George V, Chapter 11, on the 7th 
day of August, 1921, and the 12th day ot November, 1921. Presented March 15, 1922. 

Not printed. 

70. Copy of the consolidated and revised Orders and Rules of the Court ot King's Bench ot 

Saskatchewan, in accordance with Section 576 of the Criminal Code. Presented March 
15, 1922 Not printed. 

71. Copy of General Rules and Orders of the Exchequer Court of Canada, in accordance 

with the provisions of Section 88 of the Exchequer Court Act, Chapter 140, R.S.C., 
1906. Presented March 15, 1922 Not printed. 

72. Detailed statement of all bonds or securities registered in the Department of the Secre- 

tary of State of Canada, since last return (21st February, 1921), submitted to the 
Parliament of Canada under Section 32 of Chapter 19, of the Revised Statutes of 
Canada, 1906, Presented March 16, 1922 Not printed. 

73. Memorandum of Proprietary or Patent Medicine Act, as amended by Chap. 66, 9-10 

Geo. v. Presented March 17, 1922 Not printed. 

74. Statement of Revenue and Expenditure on account of Marine Hospitals Service, from 

April 1, 1921, to February 28, 1922. Presented March 17, 1922 Not printed. 

75. Fifth Annual Report ot the Editorial Committee on Government Publications, dated 30th 

January, 1922. Presented March 17, 1922 Not printed. 

9 



12-13 George V List of Sessional Papers A. 1922 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 9— Continued. 

76. Memorandum presented to the Dominion Government by the Canadian Council of Agri- 

culture regarding the Re-establishment of the Canadian Wheat Board. Presented 
March 22, 1922 Not printed. 

76<i- Written opinion of the Law Officers of the Crown upon the question of the constitu- 
tionality of the reconstitution of the Wheat Board with the powers conferred thereon 
by the Orders in Council, establishing or extending the same. Presented April 19, 1922. 

Not pi-inted. 

77. Return to an Address of the Senate of the 22nd March, 1922. for a copy of the Order in 

Council appointing P. C. Larkin as High Commissioner for Canada in London, with a 
copy of instructions defining his powers and duties. Presented March 22. 1922. Rt. 
Hon. Sir George Foster Not prtjited. 

78. Return of Orders in Council which have been published in the Canada Gazette, between 

1st January, 1921, and the 26th January, 1922. in accordance with the provisions of 
Section 77 of "The Dominion Lands Act," Chapter 20, 7-8 Edward VII. Presented 
March 23, 1922 Not printed. 

79. Return of Orders in Council which have been published in the Canada Gazette between 

the 1st January. 1921, and the 26th January, 1922, in accordance with the provisions 
of Section 19, Chapter 10, 1-2 George V — "The Forest Reserves and Parks Act." 
Presented March 23, 1922 Not priyited. 

80. Copies of Orders in Council passed between the 1st January, 1921, and the 26th January. 

1922, approving of regulations and forms prescribed in accordance with the provisions 
of Section 4, Chapter IS, 1917. "Migratory Birds Convention Act." Presented March 
23, 1922 Not printed. 

81. Return of Orders in Council which have been published in the Canada Gazette and in 

the British Columbia Gazette, between 1st January, 1921, and the 26th January, 1922, 
in accordance with provisions of Subsection (d) of Section 38 of the regulations for 
the survey, administration, disposal and management of Dominion Lands within the 
40-mile Railway Belt in the Province of British Columbia. Presented March 23, 1922. 

Not printed. 

82. Return of Orders in Council which have been published in the Canada Gazette, between 

the 1st January, 1921. and the 26th January, 1922, in accordance with the provisions 
of Section 5 of "The Dominion Lands Survey Act," Chapter 21, 7-S Edward VII. 
I»resented March 23, 1922 Not printed. 

83. Return of Orders in Council which have been published in the Canada Gazette, between 

the 1st January, 1921. and the 26th January, 1922, in accordance with the provisions 
of Chapter 47. 2 George V, entitled "The Railway Belt Water Act." Presented March 
23,1922 Not printed. 

84. Return showing all lands sold by the Canadian Pacific Railway Company during the 

year ended 30th September, 1921, together with the names of the purchasers, in 
accordance with 49 Victoria, Chapter 9, Section 8. Presented March 23, 1922. 

Not printed. 

85. Ordinances passed during the period 1st March. 1921, to 2Sth February, 1922, in accord- 

ance with provisions of Section 11, Chapter 62, Revised Statutes of Canada, 1906. 
Northwest Territories Act. Presented March 23, 1922 Not printed. 

86. Return showing the number of permits granted to take intoxicants into the North West 

Territories, for the year ended the 31st of December, 1921, in accordance with the 
provisions of the Revised Statutes, Chapter 62, Section 88. Presented March 23, 1922. 

Not printed. 

87. Regulations made under the authority of the Soldier Setltement Act, 1919, pursuant to 

Subsection 2 of Section 63. Presented March 23, 1922 Not printed. 

88. Statement showing the number of Enfranchisements under the Indian Act, from 1st 

April, 1921, to 9th March, 1922. Presented March 24, 1922 Not printed, 

89. Report of the International Joint Commission on the St. Lawrence Navigation and 

Power Investigation, 1921. 
Appendices A, B, C, D, E, E2, F, Ga, Gb, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, and Book of Plates. 
Presented March 27 and April 19, 1922 Not printed. 

89". Correspondence between the Government of Canada and the United States Government 
concerning the St. Lawrence River Improvement scheme. Presented May 30, 1922. 

PiHnted for sessional papers and distiHbution to Senators and Members. 

10 



12-13 George V List of Sessional Papers A. 1922 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 9— Continued. 

S9b- Copy of Progress Report No. 3 of the Commission appointed by the State of New Torl< 
in opposition to the St. Lawrence Ship Canal and Power Project. Presented June 5, 
1922 Not printed. 

89c, Copy of Preliminary Report of the Commission appointed by the State of New Torlc in 
opposition to the St. Lawrence Ship Canal and Power Project. Presented June 12. 1922. 

Not pnnted. 

SQd. Copy of Progress Report No. 1 of the Commission appointed by the State of New Yorl; 
in opposition to the St. Lawrence Ship Canal and Power Project. Presented June 12, 
1922 Not printed. 

89«. Copy of Progress Report No. 2 of the Commission appointed by the State of New Torts 
In opposition to the St. Lawrence Ship Canal and Power Project. Presented June 12, 
1922 Not printed. 

89A Return to an Order of the Senate for a copy of all reports and correspondence in rela- 
tion to the St. Lawxence River Ship Canal. Presented June 27, 1922. Hon. Mr. 
Casgrain Not printed. 

90. Report of the Soldier Settlement Board on its activities and operations from its incep- 

tion, January 31, 1918, to March 31, 1921. Presented March 29, 1922.... iVot printed. 

91. Statement of Remissions and Refunds in Toils and Duties, recorded in the Department 

of the Secretary of State of Canada, for year ended March 31, 1921. Presented 
March 30, 1922 Not printed. 

92. Return to an Order of the House of the 24th March, 1922, for a copy of all letters, tele- 

grams, petitions, accounts and all other documents in possession of, or under the 
control of the Government of Canada, relating to the musical instruments of the H2th 
Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force. Presented March 30. 1922. Mr. Martell. 

Not printed. 

93. Report of the Director of Dominion Experimental Farms for the fiscal year ended 

March 31, 1921. Presented March 31, 1922 Not printed. 

94. Regulations under "The Destructive Insect and Pest Act," pursuant to Section 9, Chapter 

31 of 9-10 Edward VII. Presented March 31, 1922 Not printed. 

95. Return to an Address to His Excellency the Governor General of the 24th March, 1922, 

for a copy of all letters, telegrams, petitions, Orders in Council and all other documents 
in the possession of or under the control of the Government, relating to the application 
or request made for a lease of the lands and premises of "Fort Edward" (so called), 
in the town of Windsor, Nova Scotia, tor a public play ground, or for the right of 
use of the Windsor Golf and Tennis Club. Presented March 31, 1922. Mr. Martell. 

Not printed. 

96. Second Annual Report of retirements under the Public Service Act, 1920, as amended 

1921, from July 1, 1920, the date of the inception of the Act, to December 31, 1921. 
Presented April 4, 1922 Not printed. 

97. Return to an Order of the House of the 24th March, 1922, for a Return showing what 
. amount of money has been spent by the Federal Government in harbour improvements 

of all kinds in each of the ports of Quebec, Montreal, Halifax, St. John, New Bruns- 
wiclc, Victoria, Vancouver and Prince Rupert, during the years 1900 to 1921, inclusive. 
Presented April 4, 1922. Mr. McBride Not printed. 

98. Return to an Order of the House of the 3rd April, 1922, for a copy of all documents, 

correspondence, letters and telegrams passed between the Minister of Immigration or 
any of his officials, and persons, companies, organizations, since January 1st, 1922, 
regarding the placing of immigrants upon land in the Provinces of Manitoba, Saslfatche- 
wan or Alberta. Presented April 6, 1922. Hon. Mr. Stevens Not printed. 

99. Return to an Address to His Excellency the Governor General of the 24th March, 1922, 

for a copy of all petitions, letters, telegrams, memoranda. Orders in Council, and all 
other documents in the possession of or under the control of the Government, relating 
to the establishment of a Department of Fisheries for the Dominion of Canada, to be 
presided over and administered by a Minister of Fisheries and officers independent 
of the Department of Marine and Fisheries. Presented April 6, 1922. Mr. Martell. 

Not printed. 

99o. Supplementary Return to an Address to His Excellency the Governor General of the 
24th March, 1922, for a copy of all petitions, letters, telegrams, memoranda. Orders in 
Council and all other documents in the possession of or under the control of the 
Government, relating to the establishment of a Department of Fisheries for the 
Dominion of Canada, to be presided over and administered by a Minister of Fisheries 
and officers independent of the Department of Marine and Fisheries. Presented 
April 10, 1922. Mr. Martell Not printed. 

11 



12-13 George V List of Sessional Papers A. 1922 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME Q— Continued. 

100. Return to an Order of the House of the 29th March, l!i22. for a Return showing amount 

of money paid to the Right Honourable C. J. Doherty since the 11th of May, 1855, (o) 
As Judge; (b) As Retired Judge; (c) For transportation and other expenses while 
serving as Judge; (d) For indemnity while a Member of the House of Commons; (e) 
Travelling and other expenses while acting as a Member of Parliament; (/) As a 
Minister of the Crown; (g) As travelling and other expenses while acting as a 
Minister of the Crown; (h) As travelling and other expenses during his official 
missions in E;urope and the United States; (i) As counsel on the Boundary arbitration 
proceedings between Canada and Newfoundland on the Labrador Coast; and (;) As 
Lawyer and Counsel in any other cases given to him by the Canadian Government. 
Presented April C, 1922. Mr. Lanctot JVof printed. 

101. Fourth Annual Report of the Board of Historical Publications, dated 30th March, 1922. 

Presented April 7, 1922 Not p-rinted. 

102. Copy of Report for the year 1921 of positions excluded under the provisions of Section 

3SB, from the operation of the Civil Service Act, 1918, as amended by Chap. 22, 11-12 
Geo. v.- — Part I in whole. Part II in part. Presented April 7, 1922 Not printed. 

103. Return to an Order of the House of the 3rd April. 1922. for a Return showing: 1. The 

number of Iiuildings or parts of buildings rented by the Government in the city of 
Ottawa for office purposes. 2. The rental paid in each case. Presented April 7, 1922. 
Mr. Lucas Xot printed. 

104. Return to an Order of the House of the 3rd April. 1922. for a copy of all letters, tele- 

grams, memoranda and other documents passed between the Minister of Labour and 
Mr. J. B. McLachlan. Presented April 10. 1922. Mr. Stewart (Leeds). 

Xot printed. 

105. 1. Copy of Memorandum on Anglo-French relations and of the draft of the proposed 

treaty with France presented by the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom to Mr. 
Briand at the meeting of the Supreme Council at Cannes. January, 1922. 2. Copy of 
Resolutions adopted by the Supreme Council at Cannes, January, 1922, as the basis 
of the Genoa Conference. Presented April 11,1922 Not prmted. 

105"- Return to an Address to His Excellency the Governor General of the 17th May, 1922, 
for a copy of all correspondence exchanged between the Government of Italy and the 
Canadian Government, in reference to the International Conference now being held 
at Genoa, Italy, including the Order in Council appointing delegates for Canada, and 
all instructions given to the said delegates by the Government of Canada. Presented 
May 22, 1922. Mr. Boys Not printed. 

106. List of Shareholders in the Chartered Banks of the Dominion of Canada as on Decem- 

ber 31, 1921. Presented April 11, 1922 Not printed. 

106f'. Lists (a) of Shareholders in Quebec Savings Banks: (Ij) of Unclaimed Balances, etc., 
in Quet>ec Savings Banks — made in accordance with Sections 58 and 59 of Chap. 42, 
Acts of 1913 (Quebec Savings Bank Act). Presented April 11, 1922 Not printed. 

\OQb. Lists of Unclaimed Balances, etc., in Canadian Chartered Banks, in accordance with 
Section 11 -1, Chap. 9, Acts of 1913 (The Bank .\(X.) Presented April 11. 1922. 

Not printed. 

107. Itcturn to an Order of the House of the 24th March. 1922. for a copy of all petitions, 

letters, memoranda and other documents in any way referring to negotiations carried 
on for the last three years between the Government of Canada or any Department 
thereof, and the Inverness Railway and Coal Company, concerning the purchase of said 
road by the Government. Presented April 19, 1922. Mr. Chisholm Not printed. 

108. Return to an Order of the House of the 3rd April, 1922, for a Return showing: 1. What 

amount of money has already been advanced the Quebec Harbour Commissioners by 
the Government of Canada, and what are the dates of such advances. 2. What are 
the present terminal or wharf facilities at the harbour of Quebec. 3. Whether the 
said terminal and wharf facilities are being fully utilized. 4. If not, to what extent. 

5. The daily capacity of the said facilities, both for incoming and outgoing freight 

6. What has been the daily average use of such capacity during the season of naviga- 
tion. 7. Whether such advances are subject to interest. 8. If so, whether such interest 
has been paid in full. 9. If not in full, what amount, if any, has been paid. 10. The 
total arrears of interest. 11. What additional facilities, if any, are now proposed to 
be installed. Presented April 19, 1922. Sir Henry Drayton Not printed. 

109. Return to an Address to His Excellency the Governor General of the 3rd A.pril, 1922, 

for a copy of the correspondence with the proprietors of the Quebec, Oriental and 
Atlantic and the Quebec and Western Railways or other persons on their behalf, 
concerning the operation or merging of these two roads with the Canadian National 
System.. Presented April 19, 1922. Hon. Mr. Marcil (Bonaventure) Not printed. 

12 



12-13 George V List of Sessional Papers A. 1922 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 9— Continued. 

110. Return to an Order of the House of the 5th April, 1922, for a Return showing: 1. What 

dry docks are located and operated at Vancouver, Victoria, Prince Rupert, Halifax, 
St. John. Quebec, and Montreal, respectively. 2. When they were built and put into 
commission. 3. What the dimensions of each dry dock are. 4. What the total ^oss 
tonnage was entering and leaving the Ports of Vancouver, Victoria, Prince Rupert 
Halifax, St. John, Quebec, and Montreal respectively, during the year 1921. Pre- 
sented April 19, 1922. Hon. Mr. Stevens Not printed. 

111. Return to an Order of the House of the 10th April, 1922, for a Return showing what 

amount of money has been spent by the Government of Canada each year from 1896 
to 1921 on the following harbours: St. John. Halifax, Quebec, Montreal, Toronto, 
Hamilton, Victoria and Vancouver. Presented April 19, 1922. Mr. Church. 

Not printed. 

112. Return to an Address to His Excellency the Governor General of the 10th April, 1922, 

for a copy of the Order in Council dated April twenty-first, 1921, which provided for 
the distribution of the sum granted as a bonus to Civil Servants. Presented April 19, 
1922. Mr. Garland (Carleton) Not printed. 

113. Return to an Order of the House of the 10th April, 1922, for a copy of all documents, 

contracts, agreements, correspondence, letters, memoranda and other documents, pass- 
ing between the Department of Railways and Canals and the Grand Trunk Railway 
Company, and between either of them with the various brokers and others who had to 
do with the placing of the loan made by the Grand Trunk Railway Compa,ny for 
Twenty-five million dollars during the year 1921. Presented April 19, 1922. Mr. 
Putnam Not pi-inted. 

114. Return to an Address to His Excellency the Governor General of the 10th of April, 1922, 

for a copy of all correspondence, letters, telegrams and other documents, including the 
Orders in Council, relative to the appointment and dismissal and reinstatement, as 
clerk, at the Montreal Post Office, of Jean Jacques Caisse. Presented April 19, 1922. 
Hon. Mr. Marcil (Bonaventure) Not printed 

115. Return to an Order of the House of the 3rd April, 1922, for a Return showing: 1. The 

total expenditure for the year 1921 of the Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establish- 
ment. 2. The total expenditure of the Department divided with respect to — (a) 
Pensions; ( 6) Treatment ; (c)Vocational Training; (d) Land Settlement; and (e) 
Relief of the unemployed. 3. The total expenditure of this Department for the year 
1921 for — (a) Administration of Pensions; (6) Administration and costs of treatment; 
(c) Pay and allowances of those on treatment: (d) Administration and costs of Voca- 
tional training (e) Pay and allowances of those on vocational training; (/) Land 
.Settlement Loans; (g) Administration costs of land settlement; (h) Unemployment 
relief and (i) Administration costs of unemployment relief. 4. The total expenditure 
for the year 1921 for the staff salaries, and maintenance costs of each hospital. 5. The 
number of persons, full and part time, who were on each hospital staff, and the average 
number of patients on the strength of each hospital. 6. The total expenditure for the 
year 1921 for travelling expenses of the Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment officials, 
patients not included. 7. The travelling expenses of each Commissioner of the Pension 
Board for the year 1921. Presented April 20, 1922. Mr. Duff Not printed. 

116. Return to an Order of the House of the 19th April, 1922. for a Return showing: 1. 

Quantity of coal imported from the United States into Canada in the years 1918-19, 
1919-20, 1920-21 by the Government of Canada for use upon (a) Railways; (b) 
Federal buildings and public works. 2. Amount of coal imported by the Government 
of Canada from the United States during the above mentioned years for the use upon 
railways (o) East of Lake Superior; (ft) West of Lake Superior. 3. Cost of coal per 
ton imported by the Government of Canada from the United States during the above- 
mentioned years (a) at point of production; (ft) at point of Canadian delivery. Pre- 
sented April 20, 1922. Mr. Logan Not printed. 

116a. Return to an Order of the Senate dated April 27, 1922, for a Return showing: 1. The 
quantity of (a) bituminous and (ft) anthracite coal imported from the United States 
into Canada in each of the years 1896 until 1921. inclusive. 2. The quantity of (a) 
bituminous and (ft) anthracite coal imported from the United States into Canada in 
each of the years 1S96 until 1921, inclusive, by the Government of Canada for use 
upon (1) railways; (2) Federal buildings and public works. 3. The amount of (a) 
bituminous and (ft) anthracite coal imported by the Government of Canada from th» 
United States during the above-mentioned years for use upon railways (1) East of 
Lake Superior; (2) West of Lake Superior. 4. The cost of such coal per ton imported 
by the Government of Canada from the United States during the above-mentioned 
years (1) at point of production; (2) at point of Canadian delivery. Presented June 
26. 1922. Hon. Mr. Tanner Not printed. 

13 



12-13 George V List of Sessional Papers A. 1922 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 9 — Contitmed. 

117. Return to an Order of the House of the 19th April. 1922. for a return showing: 1. 

Amount of compensation paid out of the vote for health of animals, for cattle slaught- 
ered affected with tuberculosis, during each of the years ending March 31, 1920. 1921, 
and 1922. 2. Proportion of this amount paid for animals slaughtered in herds supply- 
ing milk to the people in cities, towns and villages ; not necessarily pure-bred animals, 
during the years referred to. 3. Proportion of the total grant paid for animals under 
what is known as the accredited herd system of pure-bred animals, during each of 
the years referred to. 4. Amount paid ouf in connection with each of the pure breeds 
for which compensation was paid during each of the above years. 5. Average compen- 
sation per animal paid in connection with each breed referred to in question four, 
during each of the above years. 6. Total compensation paid in connection with each 
breed in each province during each of the three years referred to. 7. Number of 
veterinary inspectors employed by the health of animals branch of the Department in 
connection with the health of animals during each of the three years referred to. 8. 
Total amount paid in salaries to inspectors under the health of animals branch during 
the years above-mentioned. Presented April 24, 1922. Mr. Sutherland. 

Not printed. 

118. Return to an Order of the House of the 24th April. W22. for a Return showing: 1. 

Names, positions and salary of the employees of the Chief Architect's branch. Public 
Works Department, who worked on the three classifications which were posted in the 
branch. 2. Which of the three classifications was approved by the Deputy Minister 
and recommended to the Commission. 3. On what date, month and year reports or 
cards for classification from Chief Architect's branch were received by the Commission. 
4. Whether after such reports or cards for classification were received by the Commis- 
sion, there were any other special ones issued. 5. If so, on what date, month and year 
they were issued. 6. By whom they were requested. 7. Names, positions and salary 
of the persons to whom they were issued. 8. Whether all the employees were 
informed. If not. why. 9. Duties of those who received these cards. 10. For what 
position and salary each of them was requested to fill in these cards. 11. To what 
positions and salaries they were classified. 12. Position and salary of each when the 
first and second classifications were posted. 13. Amount of back pay each received. 
14. Their position and salary, also the year they were appointed in the service. Pre- 
sented April 24. 1922. Mr. Fournier , Not printed. 

119. Return to an Order of the Senate, dated 22nd March, 1922, for a Statement showing: — 

The number of soldiers who were established on land in the different provinces, the 
amount of money expended by the Government for that purpose, and whether any 
part of that money was reimbursed, and how many after a certain time left the farms 
upon which they had commenced to work. Presented April 26, 1922. Hon. Mr. David. 

Not printed. 

120. Return to an Order of the Senate, dated March 31, 1922, for a Return showing: 

1. How much money has been expended to date by the Lignite Utilization Board experi- 
menting in carbonizing lignite near Bienfait, Sask. 2. Names of Commissioners and 
amount paid to each, (o) for salaries; (b) for expenses. 3. When active work was 
stopped. 4. Names of Engineers now employed or who have been employed, and 
amount paid to each, (o) for salaries; (b) for expenses. 5. What did buildings cost. 

6. How many houses have been built for Ofticers and Engineers, and cost of same. 

7. How many houses have been built for workmen, and cost of same. 8. What has 
been cost of water supply, (a) for plant; (b) for houses. 9. What is the estimated 
cost of completing the experiments. 10. How many officers, engineers and workmen 
were on the pay list for February, 1922. 11. Who owns the land in which the plant 
and houses are built. 12. Who is the directing head in connection with the above 
experiments. 13. Is the National Research Council of Canada in any way connected 
with the above-mentioned experiments. 14. What payments, if any, have been made, 
or are to be made to the National Research Council or any member thereof. Pre- 
sented April 26, 1922. Hon. Mr. Turriff Not printed. 

121. Return to an Order of the House of the 26th April, 1922, for a return showing: 1. The 

names of the Trustees, under The Bankruptcy Act, for the district of Montreal. 2. 
When they were appointed, and their respective occupations before appointment. Pre- 
sented April 27, 1922. ilr. Archambault Not printed. 

122. Return to an Order of the House of the 3rd April, 1922, for a copy of the petition 

presented by Mr. A. Wick and others, asking for improved methods in the Quebec 
Fisheries, together with all correspondence and other documents relating thereto. 
Presented May 1, 1922. Hon. Mr. Marcil (Bonaventure) Not printed. 

123. Return to an Order of the House of the 27th March. 1922, for a copy of all letters, tele- 

grams, petitions and other documents in any way referring to the superannuation 
of John C. McQuarrie, section foreman at West Bay Road, Inverness County. Pre- 
sented May 1, 1922. Mr. Chisholm Not printed. 

14 



12-13 George V List of Sessional Papers A. 1922 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 9— Continued. 

124. Return to an Order of the House ot the 10th April, 1922, for a copy of all correspondence, 

letters, memoranda, telegrams and other documents, referring to the placing of the 
insurance upon the Canadian Northern Railway Company and the Grand Trunk 
Pacific Company, since the date of the placing of said insurance up to the present 
time. Presented May 1, 1922. Mr. Macdonald (Pictou) Not printed. 

125. Return to an Order of the House of the 24th April, 1922, for a return showing a list ot 

the names of persons from Poland, Roumania or Russia, who were allowed to enter 
Canada under bond to go farming, and who have been found, on investigation, to have 
violated terms of the said bond. Presented May 1, 1922. Hon. Mr. Stevens. 

Not printed. 

126. Return to an Order of the House of the 24th April, 1922, for a return showing: 1. How 

many Stallion Clubs received a premium or bonus from the vote for live stock during 
the year 1921. 2. Total amount so distributed, and the number of said clubs which 
received such grants, in each province, during the said year. 3. Number of pure-bred 
sires of each breed distributed by the Department of Agriculture during the five years 
ending March 31, 1922. 4. Number of animals placed in eacli province, and at what 
total cost per province, during the said period. 5. Amount paid out by the Depart- 
ment of Agriculture in payment of freight and expenses on car lots of cattle, during 
the year 1921. 6. Amount so paid in each province during the said year. 7. Amount 
paid out by the Department of Agriculture in grants on payment of freight on feed or 
live stock during each ot the years 1919, 1920 and 1921. 8. How much of this amount 
was paid out in each province during the above-mentioned years. 9. Whether any 
complaints have been made to the Department of Agriculture during the past year 
against live stock commission firms operating at the live stock yard markets under regu- 
lations of the department. 10. If so, the names of the agents complained of at each 
market, their respective offences and penalties imposed. Presented May 2, 1922. Mr. 
Sutherland Not printed. 

127. Return to an Address to His Excellency the Governor General of the 24th April, 1922, for 

a copy of all corresiJondence, letters, telegrams and other documents exchanged 
between the Canadian and the British Governments, respecting an Address passed by 
the Canadian Parliament on the subject of extra-territorality rights of the Dominion 
Presented May 2, 1922. Rt. Hon. Mr. Meighen Not printed. 

128. Return to an Address to His Excellency the Governor General of the 3rd April, 1922, 

for a copy of all correspondence passed during the year 1921, between the Prime 
Minister of Canada and the Prime Minister of Ontario, relating to the activities of 
Honourable Manning Doherty in England on the subject of the Cattle Embargo. 
Presented May 2, 1922. Mr. White Not printed. 

129< Return to an Order of the House of the 24th March, 1922, for a copy of all correspondence, 
telegrams and other documents exchanged between the Minister of Marine and Fish- 
eries and the Harbour Commissioners at Quebec or any of them, since the taking ot 
office of the present Government. Presented May 4, 1922. Rt. Hon. Mr. Meighen, 

Not printed. 

130. Return to an Order of the House of the 24th March, 1922, for a copy of all correspondence, 

telegrams and other documents exchanged between the Department of Immigration 
and Colonization or any of its officers or employees, and W. A. Rae, and Mr. Crandall, 
representing the Department, or between said Department and any one else relating 
to the case of Lee Holland and the question of his deportation. Presented May 4, 
1922. Rt. Hon. Mr. Meighen Not printed. 

131. Return to an Order of the House of the 24th April, 1922, for a return showing a list of 

the names of the persons who were employed as newspaper censors during the war. 
the name and location of the newspapers which were censored, the date of censorship 
and a copy of the articles censored. Also a copy of the regulations of the said censor- 
ship. Presented May 4, 1922. Mr. Archambault Not printed. 

132. Return to an Address to His Excellency the Governor General of the 3rd May, 1922, 

for a copy of all letters, telegrams and other documents relative to the Petition of the 
Eastern LaHave Transportal ion Company, Limited, and others, to the Secretary of 
State for E.xternal Affairs, and of all communications and replies from the United 
States Government relative to the said Petition and to the facts disclosed therein. 
Presented May 4, 1922. Mr. Macdonald (Pictou) Not printed. 

133. Return to an Order of the Senate, dated March 29, 1922, for a statement showing: The 

number of passengers to and from points north and west of Moncton, from points on 
the C.N.R. (a) Bast of New Glasgow; (b) from Halifax (excluding passengers from 
abroad travelling on through tickets in both cases). Presented May 4, 1922. Hon. 
Mr. McLennan Not printed. 

15 



12-13 George V List of Sessional Papers A. 1922 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 9— Continued. 

134. Return to an Order of the House o( the 19th April, 1922, for a return showing: 1. 

Offices, buildings or parts of buildings rented for Government purposes in the city of 
Calgary. 2. From what owners and through what rental agents such offices, buildings 
or parts of buildings are rented. 3. Rental paid in each case. 4. For what period 
such offices, buildings or parts of buildings are rented. 5. Which of such leases, if 
any, have been renewed by the present Government. Presented May 5, 1922. Mr. 
Shaw Not printed 

135. Return to an Order of the House of the 27th March, 1922, for a return showing the 

names of all persons dismissed from the Sorel Shipyards since the 29th of December, 
1921, together with the cause of dismissal in each case. Also showing the names of 
all persons taken on at the said shipyards during the same period, showing the cause 
for employment of each person. Presented May 5, 1922. Mr. H.a.nson. . . .Not printed. 

136. Return to an Order of the House of the 1st May, 1922, for a return showing: 1. Sums of 

money voted by the Federal Government for the Harbour of Toronto in the years 1912, 
1913, 1914, 1915, 1916, 1917, 1918, 1919, 1920 and 1921. 2. Sums spent by the Federal 
Government for the Harbour of Toronto in the same years. 3. Nature of the works 
done with the said amounts. 4. Number of steamers containing freight entered at 
the customs of the port of Toronto in the fiscal years 1920-21 and 1921-22. 5. Total 
dead weight tonnage of the said vessels in the two fiscal years mentioned. Presented 
May 8, 1922. Mr. Archambault Not printed. 

137. Return to an Order of the House of the 3rd April, 1922, for a return showing: 1. The 

total payments made in each year by the Government from 1914 to date, (o) to or 
for the Canadian Northern System, (&) to or for the the Grand Trunk System, (c) 
to or for the Grand Trunk Pacific System, (d) to or for the National Transcontinental, 
and (e) for the Intercolonial, distinguishing in each year the amounts loaned by the 
Crown, and in the case of the Intercolonial Railway, distinguishing between expendi- 
ture charged to revenue and expenditure charged to capital. 2. The several amounts 
in each year that were guaranteed for the said railways during the said periods, and 
the amount not borrowed of any amount guaranteed. 3. What portions of those 
amounts so paid or guaranteed (other than with respect to the Intercolonial) were for 
capital expenditure and what sums were to meet deficits. 4. What amount of each 
loan guaranteed was for refunding purposes. Presented May 8, 1922. Mr. Kennedy 
(Glengarry and Stormont) Not printed. 

138. Return to an Order of the House of the 24th April, 1922, for a copy of all letters, corre- 

spondence, telegrams, orders, instructions and other documents exchanged between 
the Solicitor General or any member of his Department, and Alfred J. Andrews, rela- 
tive to the strike in Winnipeg during the year 1919. Presented May 8. 1922. Mr. 
McMurray Not printed 

138a, Return to an Order of the House of the 24th April, 1922, for a copy of all letters, corre- 
spondence, telegrams, orders, instructions and other documents exchanged between the 
Minister of the Interior or any member of his Department and Alfred J. Andrews, 
relative to the strike in Winnipeg during the year 1919. Presented May 11, 1922. 
Mr. McMurray Not printed. 

1386. Return to an Order of the House of the 24th April, 1922, for a copy of all letters, corre- 
sitondence. telegrams, orders, instructions and other documents, exchanged between 
the Minister of Justice, the Minister of Labour, the Solicitor General, the Minister of 
the Interior, or any person connected with these Departments, and c.eneral Kitchen, 
relative to the strike in Winnipeg during the year 1919. Presented May 15, 1922. 
Mr. McMurray , Not printed. 

138c. Return to an Order of the House of the 24th April, 1922, for a copy of all letters, corre- 
spondence, telegrams, orders, instructions and other documents, exchanged between 
the Minister of Labour or any Member of his Department and Alfred J. Andrews, in 
connection with the strike in Winnipeg in the year 1919. Presented May 19, 1922. 
Mr. McMurray Not printed. 

139. Return to an Order of the House of the 5th April. 1922. for a return showing: 1. The 

number of persons made permanent in the Civil Service from the 1st of April, 1920, to 
the 1st of January, 1922. 2. The number of persons made permanent in the said service 
from December 7, 1921, to January 6, 1922, inclusive. Presented May 8, 1922. Mr. 
Demers Not printed. 

140. Return to an Order of the House of the 1st May, 1922, for a return showing: 1. Names 

of the persons employed in the Income Tax Office at Montreal. 2. The salary, and the 
date of appointment of each of said employees. Presented May 8, 1922. Mr. 
Archambault Not printed. 

141. Report of the Air Board for the year 1921. Presented May 9, 1922 Not printed. 

16 



12-13 George V List of Sessional Papers ' A. 1922 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 9— Continued. 

142. Return to an Order of the Senate of March 22, 1922, tor a Return including all corre- 

spondence between the Federal Government and the Ministers and Departments of the 
Federal Government and Provincial Governments and persons representing such Pro- 
vincial Governments in regard to the natural resources of the Western Provinces ; 
also all Orders in Council, reports, statements, Minutes of Conferences and other docu- 
ments and writings relating to the subject of the transfer of such natural resources 
to the western provinces. Presented May 9, 1922. Hon. Mr. Tanner Not printed. 

142a- Return to an Address to His Excellency the Governor General of the Sth May, 1922, for 
a copy of all correspondence passing between the Prime Minister of Canada and the 
Governments of Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta, since 10th July, 1920, respect- 
ing the transfer of natural resources. Presented May 15, 1922. Rt. Hon. Mr. 
Meighen Printed for sessional papers 

142I'. Supplementary return to an Address to His Excellency the Governor General of the Sth 
May, 1922, for a copy of ^1 correspondence passing between the Prime Minister of 
Canada and the Governments of Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta, since 10th July, 
1920. respecting the transfer of natural resources. Presented May 29, 1922. Rt. Hon. 
Mr. Meighen Printed for sessional papers. 

\i2c- Supplementary Return to an Order of the Senate, dated March 22, 1922, for a Return 
to include all correspondence between the Federal Government and the Ministers and 
Departments of the Federal Government and Provincial Governments and persons 
representing such Provincial Governments in regard to the natural resources of the 
Western Provinces: also all Orders in Council, reports, statements. Minutes of Confer- 
ences and other documents and W'ritings. relating to the subject of the transfer of such 
natural resources of the Western Provinces. Presented June 6, 1922. Hon. Mr. 
Tanner Not printed 

143. Report of the Superintendent of Insurance for the year ended December 31, 1920 — Loan 

and Trust Companies. Presented May 10, 1922 Not printed. 

144. Return to an Order of the House of the 1st May, 1922, for a return showing: 1. Number 

of armouries built in Canada during the years 1912, 1913, 1914, and 1915. 2. Where 
the said armouries are located, and the cost of building and equipment in each case. 
3. Annual cost of maintenance of each of said armouries, including caretakers, heating 
and other expenses. Presented May 10, 1922. Mr. Baldwin Not printed. 

145. Return to an Order of the House of the 10th April, 1922, for a copy of all letters, tele- 

grams, correspondence and other documents, relating to the changing of the mail 
contracts at Bonaventure, Quebec, from Syivestre Bernard to J. A. Bernard. Presented 
May 11, 1922. Hon. Mr. Marcil (Bonaventure) Not printed. 

146. Return to an Order of the House of the 10th April, 1922, for a copy of all letters, tele- 

grams, correspondence and other documents, relating to the transfer of the Post 
Office at Carleton, Quebec, from Bernard Leclerc to Auguste Defebvre. Presented 
May 11, 1922. Hon. Mr. Marcil (Bonaventure) Not printed. 

147. Return to an Order of the House of the 10th April, 1922, for a copy of all letters, tele- 

grams, correspondence and other documents, relating to the transfer of the Post Office 
at Bonaventure, Quebec, from Charles Forest to Firmin Poirier. Presented May 11, 
1922. Hon. Mr. Marcil (Bonaventure) Not printed. 

148. Return to an Order of the House of the 10th April, 1922, for a copy of all letters, tele- 

grams, correspondence and other documents, relating to the transfer of the Post Office 
at St. Omer, Quebec, from Isidore Laundry to Nicholas Arseneau. Presented May 11, 
1922. Hon. Mr. Marcil (Bonaventure) Not printed. 

149. Return to an Order of the House of the 10th April, 1922, for a copy of all letters, tele- 

grams, correspondence and other documents, relating to the transfer of the Post Office 
at Paspebiac, Quebec, from the late Mrs. J. B. Leveque to Charles Legallais. Pre- 
sented May 11, 1922. Hon. Mr. Marcil (Bonaventure) Not printed. 

150. Return to an Order of the House of the 10th April, 1922, for a copy of all letters, tele- 

grams, correspondence and other documents, relating to the transfer of the Shigawake, 
Quebec, Post Office, from John A. Legallais to Jas. Poirier. Presented May 11, 1922. 
Hon. Mr. Marcil (Bonaventure) Not printed. 

151. Return to an Order of the House of the 10th April, 1922, for a copy of all letters, corre- 

spondence and other documents, relating to the transfer of the Post Office at Avignon, 
Quebec, from Joseph Poirier to Mathias Blaquaire and Joseph Arsenault. Presented 
May 11, 1922. Hon. Mr. Marcil (Bonaventure) Not printed. 

152. Return to an Order of the House of the 1st May, 1922, for a return showing: 1. Names 

of the employees of the Montreal Post Office. 2. Respective dates of employment of 
said persons. 3. Salary of each of said employees. Presented May 11. 1922. Mr 
Archambault Not printed 

17 



12-13 George V - List of Sessional Papers A. 1922 



CONTENTS OF VOLXnttE 9— Continued. 

153. Return to an Order of the House of the 19th April, 1922, for a copy of Timber License 

issued to the Union Banlt of Canada or any other parties to cut timber on Indian 
Lands in the Township of Laird, District of Algoma, together with a copy of all corre- 
spondence, letters, memoranda, telegrams and other documents, passing between the 
Indian Agent at Sault St. Marie, the Licensees or any other parties, and the Depart- 
ment of Indian Affairs, in connection therewith. Also a statement of all dues paid 
the Department in respect to said License. Presented May 11, 1922. Mr. Simpson. 

Xot printed. 

154. Return to an Order of the House of the 1st May, 1922, for a return showing: 1. Whether 

it is the intention of the Government to operate the greater production farms on the 
Blackfoot Indian Reserve at Gleichen. Alberta, this year. 2. If not, how does the Gov- 
ernment intend disposing of them. 3. Whether proper precautions will be taken to 
prevent the country being seeded with weeds from these neglected farms. 4. Number 
of acres broken by the Government on these fanps. 5. The cost per acre. 6. From 
whom, at what place, and at what price the seed wheat for these farms was pur- 
chased. 7. From whom, at what point, and at what price the feed oats were purchased 
during the first and second years of operation. 8. Average yield each year of opera- 
tion. 9. Net price received per bushel for wheat grown. 10. To whom this wheat was 
sold. 11. Net profit per acre each year. Presented May 11, 1922. Mr. Garland (Bow 
River) Not printed. 

155. Return to an Order of the House of the 8th May, 1922, for a Return showing: — 

1. Whether it is a fact that appeals made by many Civil Servants who are dissatisfied 
with their classification never reach the Board of Hearing. 2. Whether it is true 
that such appeals are from the decisions of heads or chiefs of branches who declined 
to recommend the classifications claimed to be in accord with the character of the 
work done by such Civil Servants. 3. Whether it is true such appeals fail to reach 
the Board of Hearing because they are so prevented by the heads or chiefs against 
whose decisions such appeals are made. 4. If so, whether the Government intends 
taking any steps to see justice done such Civil Servants, by having their appeals 
reach the Board of Hearing notwithstanding the opposition of such heads or chiefs 
against whose decisions such appeals are made. 5. If not, why not. Presented 
May 11, 1922. Mr. Lanctot Not printed. 

156. Return to an Order of the House of the 11th May, 1922, for a return showing: — 

1. In what countries Canada is represented by trade agents. 2. Names of said 
agents, and salary each receives. Presented May 11, 1922. Mr. Frevost.. .Not printed. 

157. Return to an Address to His Excellency the Governor General of the 3rd April, 1922, 

for a copy of all correspondence, telegrams, reports and other documents exchanged 
between the Department of the Interior or any of its officers or employees, and the 
Gold Commissioner of Yukon Territory, or any other person or official, concerning 
the application to Yukon Territory of the Order in Council which provides that the 
Mining Recorders shall not receive for record, transfers of interests in mineral 
claims, when such interests are less than one quarter interest. Also a copy of the 
said Order in Council. Presented May 15, 1922. Mr. Black (Yukon) Not printed. 

158. Return to an Order of the House of the 1st May, 1922, for a return showing a list 

of the names of the permanent employees of the Montreal Harbour Commission, the 
salary of each, date of appointment and salary on appointment, age, occupation, 
and the respective previous occupations of said employees. Presented May 15, 1922. 
Mr. Archambault Not printed. 

159. Return to an Order of the House of the 26th April, 1922, for a copy of all correspond- 

ence, telegrams, letters, agreements, contracts, claims, memoranda and other docu- 
ments between the Caraquet and Gulf Shore Railway Company and the Government 
of Canada, relating to the purchase of the said railway. Presented May 15, 1922. 
Mr. Hanson Not printed. 

159a. Supplementary Return to an Order of the House of the 26th April, 1922, for a copy 
of all correspondence, telegrams, letters, agreements, contracts, claims, memoranda 
and other documents between the Caraquet and Gulf Shore Railway Clompany and 
the Government of Canada, relating to the purchase of the said railway. Presented 
May 19, 1922. Mr. Hanson Not printed. 

160. Return to an Address to His Excellency the Governor General of the 3rd April, 1922, 

for a copy of all correspondence, telegrams, reports, and other documents exchanged 
between the Department of the Interior, or any of its officers or employees, and the 
Gold Commissioner of the Yukon Territory, or any other person, during the years 
1919, 1920 and 1921, concerning the imposition of a Royalty tax or Government 
charge upon the output of minerals, other than gold, for the Yukon Territory. Also 
a copy of the Order in Council in this connection. Presented May 16, 1922. Mr. 
Black (Yukon) Not printed. 

18 



12-13 George V List of Sessional Papers A. 1922 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 9— Continued. 

161. Return to an Order of the Senate of the 16th May. 1922, for a Return showing: — 

1. The total cost of construction and repairs of each canal in Canada. 2. Between 
what points is each canal situated and the mileage of each. 3. The total expenditure 
for upkeep and operation of each canal during each of the years since 1910. 4. WTiat 
income has been received from each of the canals each year since 1910. Presented 
May 16, 1922. Hon. Mr. McDonald Not printed. 

162. Return to an order of the Senate, dated March 29, 1922, for a Return showing; — 

1. A list of all licenses issued by the Government, now in force, for timber berths and 
the right to cut timber on Crown Lands in the Provinces of Manitoba, Sasl^atchewan, 
Alberta and British Columbia. 2. The names and residence of the holders of such 
licenses and the area contained in each berth. 3. On what terms and conditions were 
such licenses granted. 4. What is the area and location of timber berths in said 
provinces still unlicensed and the estimated quantity and description of timber in 
each berth. Presented May 16, 1922. Hon. Mr. Proudfoot Not printed. 

163. Return to an Order of the House of the 10th April. 1922, for a Return showing: 1. Amount 

of bonds (o) of the Canadian Northern, (6) of the Grand Trunk Pacific guaranteed 
by any of tlie provinces, and which province in each case. 2. Whether the guaran- 
teeing provinces have been relieved of liability by the Federal Government taking 
over these railway systems. 3. Bonds or other securities in connection with railways 
in (o) New Brunswick; (b) Nova Scotia; (c) Prince Edward Island guaranteed 
or assumed by the Federal Government. 4. Terms under which the Department of 
Railways operates the Valley Railway, so called, in New Brunswick. 5. Whether 
this railway is operated as part of the Intercolonial or under what jurisdiction it 
has been placed. 6. Whether its operation entails any loss to the Federal Government. 
If so, to what amount and of what it consists. 7. Whether the Government is 
considering the taking over of the Valley Railway, so called. Presented May 17, 
1922. Hon. Mr. Baxter Not printed. 

164. Return to an Order of the House of the 17th May, 1922, for a Return showing: — 

1. The consumption of binder twine and rope, in the various provinces of Canada, 
during the year 1921. 2. How much of this was manufactured in Canada. Presented 
May 17, 1922. Mr. Gordon Not printed. 

165. Return to an Order of the Senate dated May 10, 1922, for a Copy of the different 

leases between the Government and the Montreal Dry Dock Company. Presented 
May 18, 1922. Hon. Mr. Boyer Not printed. 

165a. Supplementary Return to an Order of the Senate, dated May 10, 1922, for a Return 
for a Copy of the different leases between the Government and the Montreal Dry 
Dock Company. Presented June 16, 1922. Hon. Mr. Boyer Not printed. 

166. Return to an Order of the House of the 1st May, 1922, for a copy of all correspondence, 

letters, telegrams, contracts, tenders and other documents, relating to the employ- 
ment or use of the tug Pekin, and any other tug or tugs hired or used by the Govern- 
ment in connection with the Government dredges, in and around Prince Edward 
Island, from June, 1911, to March 31, 1922. Presented May 19, 1922. Mr. MacLean 
(Prince) Not printed. 

167. Return to an Order of the House of the 27th March, 1922, for a copy of all letters, 

telegrams, reports, memoranda, informations and warrants, minutes of evidence and 
convictions, and all other Court proceedings relating or in anywise appertaining to 
the trial and conviction of Clyde Heath and Gurney Young, of Tancook, Nova Scotia, 
for a violation of the Migratory Birds Convention Act. Also a copy of the Order 
in Council dated on or about the 19th day of November, 1921, authorizing and 
empowering the remission of all fines and forfeitures occasioned by the conviction 
of said Clyde Heath and Gurney Young. Presented May 19, 1922. Mr. Martell. 

Not printed. 

168. Return to an Order of the House of the 1st May, 1922, for a Return showing: — 

1. Names of the employees of the Department of Customs and Excise, Montreal. 2. 
Salary paid to each of said employees. 3. Respective dates of employment of said 
employees. Presented May 22, 1922. Mr. Archambault Not printed. 

169. Return to an Order of the House of the 4th May, 1922, for a Return showing: — 

1. The cost of the trips to Europe of the Ministers of the Canadian Government 
during the war period and since. 2. The cost for each Minister who attended any 
of the after war conferences held at Paris, Geneva or elsewhere in Europe. 3. How 
much, if any, each one of such Ministers has returned to the Treasury of the amounts 
allowed for such trips over and above their actual expenses. 4. The names of such 
Ministers a.nd the respective amounts allowed to each, as well as the amounts 
returned by each. Presented May 22, 1922. Mr. Lanctot Not printed. 

19 



12-13 George V List of Sessional Papers A. 1922 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 9— Continued. 

170. Return to an Order of the House of the 8th May, 1922, for a Return showing: — 

1. Number of raultigraph machines in use in the various departments of the Govern- 
ment. 2. Volume of work done on these machines, by departments, during the fiscal 
year 1921-1922. 3. Whether this work is under the control of the Editorial Com- 
mittee. Presented May 22, 1922. Mr. McDonald (Timiskaming) Not printed. 

171. Return to an Order of the House of the 26th April, 1922, for a copy of all petitions or 

memorials from residents of the County of Charlotte, New Brunswick, made to the 
Department of Marine and Fisheries, asking that a minimum price per hogshead 
be placed on all sardines sold for export during the present fishing season, and for 
a copy of all correspondence and other documents relating thereto. Presented 
May 22, 1922. Mr. Grimmer Not printed. 

172. Return to an Order of the House of the 22nd May, 1922, for a copy of all letters, 

telegrams, correspondence and other documents that have passed between the oflficials 
of the Grand Trunk Railway, the officials of the Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen, 
and the Order of Railway Conductors, and all agreements signed between the officials 
of the Grand Trunk Railway and officials of the Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen 
and the Order of Railway Conductors, regarding the strike on the Grand Trunk 
Railway System, of trainmen and yardmen, in 1910, and particularly the correspond- 
ence and agreements affecting the seniority rights of the men who worked during 
this strike. Presented May 23, 1922. Mr. King (Huron) Not printed. 

173. Return to an Order of the House of the 11th May, 1922, for a Return showing: — 

1. How many acres of School Lands have been sold in Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and 
Alberta, during the four years of 1918, 1919, 1920 and 1921. 2. Amount of money 
overdue in respect to the above sales in (a) principal, and (6) interest. Presented 
May 29, 1922. Mr. Spencer Not printed. 

174. Return to an Order of tlie House of the 15th May, 1922, for a return showing:— 

1. Number of Civil Servants in Canada receiving salaries of eight hundred dollars 
and less per annum. 2. Number receiving nine hundred and sixty dollars or less. 
Presented May 29, 1922. Mr. McQuarrie Not printed. 

175. Partial Return to an Order of the House of the 5th April, 1922, for a Return showing 

in detail the amount of money paid by the Government of Canada or any depart- 
ment thereof, to barristers and solicitors of the Supreme Court of Nova Scotia, 
between the 1st day of October, 1911, and the 30th day of January, 1922, both 
inclusive, for professional or other services. Also a copy of all bills of costs, expenses 
and charges of every kind rendered by said barristers and solicitors to the Govern- 
ment, showing the amount or amounts paid in each instance. Also showing the 
names of barristers and solicitors employed during the aforesaid period, the work 
performed and the amount paid for every item of said work to each of said barristers 
and solicitors. Presented May 29, 1922. Mr. Martell Not printed. 

175a-b-c Supplementary Returns to an Order of the House of the 5th April, 1922, tor a 
Return showing in detail the amount of money paid by the Government of Canada 
or any department thereof, to barristers and solicitors of the Supreme Court of 
Nova Scotia, between the 1st day of October, 1911, and the 30th day of January, 
1922, both inclusive, for professional or other services. Also a copy of all bills of 
costs, expenses and charges of every kind rendered by said barristers and solicitors 
to the Government, showing the amount or amounts paid in each instance. Also 
showing the names of barristers and solicitors employed during the aforesaid period, 
the work performed and the amount paid for every item of said work to each of said 
barristers and solicitors. Presented June 5, 15, 19, 1922. Mr. Martell. . . .Not pri^ited. 

176. Return to an Order of the House of the 6th April, 1922, tor a Return showing: — 

1. The total area in acres in the provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan sold to 
settlers as Pre-emptions, as provided by Dominion Lands Act, 1908. 2. "^Tiat area 
of said Pre-emptions has been patented. 3. The total revenue received from: (o) 
Pre-emptions for which patent has been issued. (6) Pre-emptions which have not 
been patented. 4. The amount remaining unpaid on all pre-empted lands in said 
area. 5. The revenue received from pre-empted lands in said area in the years 
1920 and 1921. 6. How much land in said area was sold as purchased homesteads 
since 1908, and the revenue received therefrom. 7. The amount remaining unpaid 
on said purchased homesteads. S. How much land was pre-empted south of Wey- 
burn-Lethbridge railway since 1908. 9. How much revenue was received therefrom. 
10. How much was received in the years 1920 and 1921. Presented May 29, 1922. 
Mr. McTaggart Not printed. 

177. Return to an Order of the House of the 15th May, 1922, for a Return showing: — 

1. Names of the postmasters, and the location of their offices, in the county of 
I'Assomption and Montcalm who were dismissed from the service from the twenty- 
first of September, 1911, to January first, 1922, and the names of persons replacing 
them. 2. Who recommended the dismissals and appointments. Presented June I. 
1922. Mr. Seguin Not vrinted. 

20 



13-13 George V List, of Sessional Papers A. 1922 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 9—ConHnimd. 

178. Rrtiiiii to an Order of the House of the Slh May, in22. for a Return shovvine: 

1. Niimhrr of postmasters who have been appointed in the eonsi ilnency of Richmond 
and Wolfe, from the 21st September, 191). to the 1st -of .January, 1922. 2. Names 
of .said postmasters, the location of post offlocs and the names of the persons who 
recommended the appointment in each case. I'resentcd June 1, 1922. Mr. Tobin. 
, _„ Not printed. 

179. ncturn to an Order of the House of the Sth May. 1922, for a Return showing: 

1. Number of postmasters dismissed from office, in the constituency of Kichmond 
and Wolfe, from the 21st day of September, 1911, to the 1st day of .January. 1922. 

2. Number of jiostmasters who resigned their offices in the constituency of Richmond 
and Wolfe during the same period. 3. Number of postmasters who died in the .said 
constituency during the same period, 4. What were, in each case, the names of the 
postmasters and the names of the post offices. 5. Cause of dismissal in each rase 
where the postmaster was dismissed, during the said period. Presented June 1, 1922. 
Mr. Tobin Kot printed. 

ISO, Return to an Order of the House of the 31st May, 1922, for a Return showing: — 
1. Cost for operation and maintenance of the Fisheries of British Columbia annually, 
for the years 1917-1918, 1919-1920 and 1921, in the nature of ofBce staff, buildings, 
upkeep and rentals, patrol, boats and upkeep, field work, hatcheries, and any other 
such items that may be charged against this department. 2. Amount of revenue 
collected from the Fisheries of British Columbia by the Dominion Fisheries Depart- 
ment, annually, for the years 1917-191S, 1919-1920 and 1921, in the form of license 
fees, royalties on canned salmon, prosecutions and fines, sale of confiscated boats 
and gear, and any such revenue as may be collected by the department. Presented 
June 5, 1922. Mr. Neill Not printed. 

180a. Return to an Address to His Excellency the Governor General of the 22nd May, 1922, 
for a copy of all letters, telegrams, correspondence, reports, and other documents, 
exchanged between the Government of Canada or any Minister thereof, and the 
Government of British Columbia or any minister thereof, or received from any 
person, relative to the advisability of transferring the control or administration 
of the Canadian fisheries of the Pacific coast, to the province of British Columbia. 
Presented June 20, 1922. Mr. McQuarrie Not printed. 

181. Protocols embodying Amendments to Articles 4, 6, 12, 13, 15, IG, and 26 of the Covenant 

of the League of Nations, as adopted by the Second Assembly of the League at 
Geneva on the 3rd, 4th and Sth October, 1921 ; together with letter dated the 24th 
November, 1921, from the Secretary General of the League to the Prime Minister 
of Canada, transmitting certified copies of the Protocols. Presented June 7, 1922. 
Pri7ited for Sessional Papers and distribution to Senators and Members. 

181n. Return to an Order of the Senate of the Sth June, 1922, for a Return showing: — 
1, Whether the Government has received any report from the representatives of 
Canada as to the Second Assembly of the League of Nations held in Geneva in Sep- 
tember and October, 1921, and if so. whether this report will be laid on the table for the 
information of members. 2. Whether the Government has received the printed reports 
of the Council of the League of Nations made to the first and .second Assembly, and 
If so. whether cr>]iies of these reports will be laid on the table for the inforination of 
members. 3. Whether the (Jovernment has received the printed monthly summary 
and supplementary reports of the League of Nations and whether copies of these 
reports will be brought down. Presented June 8, 1922. Rt. Hon. Sir (leo. E. Foster. 

Not printed. 

1816. Copy of Draft Conventions and Recommendations adopted by the International Labour 
Conference at its Third Session, held at Geneva, 25th October-19th November, 1921. 
Presented June 24, 1922 Not printed. 

182. Return to an Order of the House of the 15th May, 1922, for a copy of all correspond- 

ence, telegrams, letters, tenders and other documents, exchanged between the Govern- 
ment and Hector Chevrler, regarding the contract for carrying the mails between 
Rigaud and St. Redempteur, Quebec. Presented June 8, 1922. Mr. Ouimet. 

Not printed. 

183. Return to an Address to His Excellency the Governor General of the lOlh April. 1922, 

for a copy of all letters telegrams, memoranda, reports to Council. Orders in Council, 
accounts and other documents, relating to the Indian Agency at Bear River, Digby 
County, Nova Scotia, including a list of all suitplies of every description stipplied 
for the use of Indians under the control of said agency. Also a statement showing 
a list of the supplies, consisting of clothing, food, seed and other materials, to whom 
supplied and what quantity in each case, during the period from the first October, 
1911. to and including the first of January, 1922. Presented June S. 1922. Mr. 
Lovett Not printed. 

184. Return to an Order of the House of the 15th May. 1922, for a copy of all correspond- 

ence, letters, telegrams, memoranda and other documents, regarding the establish- 
ment of a Tobacco Experimental Station at I'Assomption, Quebec, and the purchasing 
of the college farm for this purpose. Presented June 9, 1922. Mr. Seguin. .Not printed. 

21 



12-13 George V List of Sessional Papers A. 1923 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 9—Con(ir,ued. 

185. Return to an Order of tlie Houfo r.f the Isl May. 1922, for a ropy of all letters, tele- 

grams, rorrespondenre and other docuinenls exchanged between the Post Office 
Department at Ottaw^i. and the ofticers of the said department at Montreal, and the 
Civil Service I'omniission. regarding the appointment of Mr. Taylor as As.sistanl 
Superintendent at Montreal Post OfHce. Presented June 12. 1922. .Mr. Parent. 

S'ot printetl. 

186. Return to an Order of the House of the 24th April. 1922. for a copy of all correspond- 

ence. letter.s. telegrams and other documents regarding the appointment of one or 
more appraisers for Paris and London, made by the Civil Service Commission. 
Presented June 12, 1922. Mr. Parent Not printed. 

187. Return to an Order of the House of the 19th April, 1922, for a Return showing: — 

I. Total amount of lionus paid to civil servants up to April 1. 1921. 2. Total amount 
paid to civil .servants on account of annual statutory increase for the fiscal years 
1918. 1919, 1920 and 1921. Presented June 12. 1922. Mr. I^anctot Nnt printed. 

188. Return to an Order of the Hou.se of the 20th April, 1922, for a Return showing: — 

1. The total CHistoms collections received by the Port of Parry Sfuind. Ontario, 
during each year, from 1911 to 1921. inclusive. 2. What towns or cities in Canada, 
having equal or less average Customs collections, have public l>uildings used for 
Customs purposes. Presented June 12, 1922. Mr. Arthurs Not printed. 

189. Return to an Order of the House of the 17th May. 1922, for a Return showing: — 

1. Cost, in each Military District, of transportation, in connection with the Army 
Service Corps. 2. Number of horses, automobiles, motor trucks "und other A'ehicles 
in the Army Service Corps. 3. Number of officers and men in this section of the 
Militia. 4. Total value of all equipment of the Army Service Corps, and amount 
spent on upkeep and repairs to equipment, including forage, sickness, etc., during 
the year ending March 31, 1922. 5. Whether this service would cost less to the 
country if the forage, supplies, and transportation were given by contract each year 
to an individual, according to lowest tender, or done by day work. Presented June 
13. 1922. Mr. Lanctot Not printed. 

190. Return to an Order of the House of the 31st May, 1922, for a Return showing: — 

1. What buildings were occupied, as offices, at Ottawa, by the Department of Militia 
and Defence, for the year ending March 31. 1911, and for the year ending March 
31, 1922, (o) for the General Headquarters, and (6) for each service of this depart- 
ment, 2, What buildings were occupied, as offices, in each Military District, (a) for 
the District Staff: (b) for the Army Pay Corps; (c) for the Veterinary Corps; (d) 
for the Medical Corps: (e) for the Engineers Corps; (/) tor the Ordnance Corps; 
and (,o) for the Army Service Corps. 3. Strength of the Permanent Force in each 
Military District for the year ending March 31. 1911, and for the year ending March 
31, 1922. 4. During the above .vears. the number of officers of the Army Pay Corps, 
the respective rank and salary of each, and the number of clerks employed in this 
service, in each district. .5. Whether the department in future intends to keep more 
than one officer of the Army Pay Corps in each district, and to continue the Auditor 
Branch which was organized in each Military District during the war. Presented 
June 13, 1922. Mr. Lanctot Not printed. 

191. Return to an Order of the Senate, dated May IS, 1922, tor; — A Copy of the different 

letters, telegrams and other documents exchanged between the Government and the 
Northern Explosive Company, concerning the erection and operation of the Rigaud 
plant belonging to this company. Presented June 13, 1922. Hon. Mr. Boyer. 

Not printed. 

192. Return to an Order of the Senate, dated June li. 1922. for: — Copies of all correspond- 

ence exchanged between the Minister of Agriculture of the Dominion of Canada, and 
the Minister of Agriculture of the province of Ontario, on the subject of extending 
to Cold Storage Warehouses, owned by co-operative companies of fruit growers, the 
system of subsidies to public Cold Storage Warehouses now provided for by the Cold 
Storage Act, 1907, chapter six. Presented June 13, 1922. Hon. Mr. Laird. 

Not printed. 

193. Return to an Order of the House of the 15th May, 1922, for a Return showing: — 

1. Number of Generals on active service in the Canadian Militia. 2. How many 
in Ottawa. 3. Respective salaries, including allowances, of each General stationed 
at Ottawa. 4. Number of Colonels^ Lieutenant-Colonels. Majors. Captains and 
Lieutenants at Headquarters, Ottawa, n. Number of non-commissioned officers and 
privates employed as clerks or messengers at Headquarters, Ottawa. 6. Total 
amount paid in salaries to the above-mentioned ofHcers and men. Presented June 
15, 1922. Mr. Lanctot Not printed. 

194. Return to an Order of the House of the 15th May. 1922, for a Return showing: — 

1. Number of Military Districts in Canada during the year ending March 31, 1922. 

2. Where they were located, and the rank of the Commanding Officer of each district. 

3. Their respective ranks on March 31. 1914. 4. Number of officers on the General 
Staff of each of the said districts during the year ending March 31, 1922. 5. The 

22 



32-13 George V List of Sessional Papers A. 1922 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 9— Continued. 

rank, and the respective duties of eacli of tiie said officers, including tile I'oni- 
manding Officer. G. Number of non-nonimissioned officers and privates employed as 
clerks in the offices of tile General Staff of eacii of tlie said districts. 7. Number of 
officers, non-commissioned officers and men employed in eacli of the said districts, 
during the year ending March 31, 1922, in connection with the Medical Cori)s, 
Engineering Corps, Pay Corps. Army Service Corps, Veterinary Corps and Military 
Stores, and rank of these officers. 9. On what date the new schedule for salaries and 
allowances came into force. 9. Who is authorized to fix the schedule for .salaries 
and allowances of the Militia. 10. Maximum salary, including allowances, for 
Colonels, Lieutenant-Colonels. Majors. Captains. Lieutenants, non-commissioned 
officers and privates, of the Permanent Militia, according to both the new and old 
schedules. 11. Salaries, including allowances, of Generals who are stationed at 
Headquarters. Ottawa, according to the new and old schedules. 12. Number of 
privates in the Permanent Militia on March 31. 1922. 13. Number of Generals. 
Colonels. Lieutenant-Colonels. Majors. Captains and Lieutenants, on active service 
in the Canadian Militia on March 31, 1922. 14. Strength of a company and regiment 
of the Militia in peace lime. Presented June 15, 1922. Mr. Lanctot Not printed. 

195. Return to an Order of llie House of the 22nd May. 1922, for a Return showing the 

origin of all goods purchased by the Purchasing Commission, distinguishing such as 
are of Canadian manufacture from those of foreign origin, from the first of April. 
1921. to date. Presented Jvme Iti. 1922. Mr. Raymond Not printed. 

196. Return to an Order of the House of the Stli May, 1922, for a Return showing: — 

1. Whether the Government is aware that there are instances of officials in the public 
service subordinate to Dejiuty Ministers who are in receipt of salaries more than 'those 
paid to such Depiity Mitiisters. 2. If so, whether it is the policy of the (government 
to continue this custom. 3. Deputy Ministers or other officials in the public service 
receiving more tlian six thousand dollars per annum from any Government source. 
Presented June 16, 1922. Mr. Chisholm Not printed. 

197. Return to an Address to His Excellency the Governor General of the 31st May. 1922, 

for a copy of all letters, telegrams, memoranda, reports to Council. Orders in Council, 
and other documents passing between the Government and any otlier parties relating 
to . the internment, deportation, return, and claims for compensati(jn of Robert 
DeBeaux. Pre.sented June 10, 1922. Mr. Neill Nut printed. 

198. Return to an Order of the Senate, dated May 17, 1922, for a Return showing: — 

(a) The aggregate number of acres of land located within the present territorial 
limits of the province of Saskatchewan granted by way of subsidy or bonus tor the 
construction of railways beyond the boundaries of tlie said province, ib) The names 
of the persons and companies receiving such grant and the amount in each case, and 
date. (c) The dates or approximate dates of selections of land by the persons and 
companies receiving the bonus or grant. (rf) The locations of the land so selected 
or finally selected by the grantees. Presented June 16, 1922. Hon. Mr. Willoughby. 

Not printed. 

199. Annual Report of the Canadian National Railways for the year ended 31st Deember, 

1921. Presented June 19, 1922 Not printed. 

200. Third Annual Report of the Board of Directors of Canadian Government Merchant 

Marine, Limited, for the year ended 31st December, 1921. Presented June 19. 1922. 

Not printed. 

201. Return to an Order of the House of April 24, 1922. for a copy of all letters, lelegranis. 

applications, petitions and other documents exchanged between the Government and 
individuals or companies, referring to conditions imposed on various railway com- 
panies intending to use the Quebec Bridge for the purpose of reaching the city of 
Quebec. Pre.sented June 19, 1922. Mr. Parent Not printed. 

202. Return to an Order of the House of April 24. 1922, for a copy of contracts, correspond- 

ence, agreements and other documents, during the period from the year 1911 to 
date, between the Government directly, or through any Commission, and the Cana- 
dian Pacific Railway or any other railway, referring to the construction and use 
of the Union Station at Palais, city of Quebec. Presented June 19, 1922. Mr. Parent. 

Not printed. 

203. Return to an Order of the House of March 24, 1922. for a copy of all correspondence, 

letters, telegrams, and other documents exchanged between the Departments of 
Justice and Marine and Fisheries and the Compagnie du Pare St. Charles, Limited. 
Presented June 19, 1922. Hon. Mr. Marcil (Bonaventure) Not printed. 

204. Return to an Order of the House of May IS, 1922, for a Return showing: — 1. The 

number of civil servants in the employ of the Government on the first of January, 
1912, and the total amount of salary paid to them. 2. The number of civil servants 
in the employ of the Government on the first of January. 1922. and the total amount 
of salary paid to them. Presented June 19, 1922. Mr. Seguin Not printed. 

23 



12-13 George V List of Sessional Papers A. 1922 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 9— Continued. 

205. Keturn to an Order of the House of May 22, 1922, for a copy of all letters, teleerams, 

correspondence and other documents exchanged between the Government of Canada 
and any other parties, relative to the claims of H. W. A. Page. Presented Jun- 
19, 1922. Mr. Neill Sot printed. 

206. Return to an Order ot the House of May 10, 1922. for a copy of all correspondence 

between the Minister of Marine and Fisheries or any official of that department, 
and the Minister of Justice or any official of his department, in reference to judgment 
given by Mr. Justice Morrison, of British Columbia, in regard to the mode of appoint- 
ment of persons to act as nautical assessors to assist the Dominion wreck com- 
missioners in an investigation of wrecks and other marine casualties. Presented 
June 19, 1922. Mr. Church Not printed. 

207. Return to an Order of the House of the 22nd May. 1922, for a copy of all letters. 

telegrams, correspondence and other documents exchanged between the Government 
of Canada and any other parties, relating to the appointment and residence in the 
County, of Junior County Court Judge, for the County of Nanaimo, British Columbia. 
Presented June 20, 1922. Mr. Neill Not printed. 

208. Return to an Address to His Excellency the Governor General of the 5th June, 1922, 

fur a copy of all correspondence, letters, telegrams, and other documents exchanged 
between the Dominion Government or any minister or officers thereof, and the 
Government of British Columbia, or the Premier of the said province or any minister 
or officer thereof, regarding the assumption by the Dominion Government of an issue 
of Canadian Northern bonds (estimated $40,000,000) guaranteed by the province 
of British Columbia and the releasing of the British Columbia Government of all 
liability in regard to the same. Presented June 21, 1922. Hon. Mr. Stevens. 

Not printed. 

209. Return to an Order of the House of the 12th June, 1922, for a copy of all letters, tele- 

grams and documents or correspondence passing between the Order of Grain Buyers 
and the Board of Grain Commissioners, or passing between the Order of Grain Buyers 
and the Government or between the Board of Grain Commissioners and the Govern- 
ment or officials thereof respecting the said Order of Grain Buyers. Presented June 
21, 1922. Hon. Mr. Stevens Not printed. 

210. Return to an Order of the Senate dated June 8, 1922, for a Return showing: — 

1. The road projects in respect to which the Federal Government has made pay- 
ments to the Government of Nova Scotia. 2. The amount paid in respect to each 
of the projects and the dates of payment. 3. The balances, it any, claimed by the 
Government of Nova Scotia in respect to each of the projects. 4, All other road 
projects which have been submitted by the Government of Nova Scotia to the Federal 
Government, the mileage of each, the proposed cost ot each ; and the projects 
respectively that have been approved by the Federal Department. Presented June 
21, 1922. Hon. Mr. Tanner Not printed. 

211. Return to an Order of the Senate dated June 8. 1922, for a return of copies of all 

agreements between the Government or any department of the Government and the 
Acadia Coal Company in respect to the railway between New Glasgow and Thorburn 
in Nova Scotia. Presented June 21, 1922. Hon. Mr. Tanner Not printed. 

212. Copy of Treaty of Peace between the Allied and Associated Powers and Hungary, and 

Protocol and Declaration, signed at Trianon, June 4, 1920. Presented June 22, 1922 

Not printed 

213. t-opy of Treaty of Pe;ice with Turkey, signed at SJvres, August 10, 1920. Presented 

June 22, 1922 Not printed. 

214. Return to an Order of the Hou.se of the 15th June, 1922, for a Return showing: — 

I. The amounts paid by the Government, and to whom, fur auditing public expenditure 
since the Civil Service Act of 1918 became effective. 2. The total amount of the 
claims of the Clarkson Commission for inquiry and audit in the Militia Department 
in respect of the sterling exchange payments to returned soldiers and others. 3. 
Whether any or all of the sterling exchange payments made by the Chief Accountant 
were audited by the Audit Staff of the Militia Department. 4. The total amount 
computed or estimated to have been fraudulently obtained in exchange transactions 
by or on behalf of returned soldiers or others. 5. Whether any of the officials or 
employees of the Accounts Branch, Militia Department, who were connected with 
or responsible for handling sterling exchange payments to returned soldiers or others, 
received any increase in pay or were classified in a higher grade by the Civil Service 
Commission after undertalcing this sterling exchange worlv. 0. If so, the names of 
such officials or employees. 7. At what rate of pay Messrs. Allen, Lowe and Hubbell 
were paid each fiscal year since their appointment, and on what dates increases of 
pay by reclassification or otherwise became eft'ective. 8. Before being permanently 
appointed, wliether these men passed any examination prescribed by the tMvll Ser\ ice 
Commission. Presented June 23, 1922. Mr. Vien .Vol printed. 

24 



12-13 George V J.ist of Sessional Papers A. 1922 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 9—Conrluded. 

215. Return to an Order of the House of the 1st May, 1922, for a Return showing: — 

1. The amount of money the Canadian Government advanced to the Imperial Govern- 
ment each year, from tlie declaration of the late war up to the present date, and on 
what dates the said amounts were advanced. 2. How much, if any, the (government 
of Canada has received as reimljursement for these advances. 3. Whether this 
reimbursement was made in cash or in kind. 4. If in kind, what articles were 
received, and of what value. Presented June 23, 1922. Mr. Vien Not printed. 

216. Return to an Order of the House of the 10th April, 1922, for a copy of all letters. 

telegrams, correspondence, rulings of the department, and all other documents 
regarding the claim for Cfmipensati*m to the owners of Crown Patents to lot two 
hundred and twenty-five. Hudson Bay Company's survey, in tlie parish of St. John, 
Manitoba. Presented June 23, 1922. Mr. Garland (Carleton) Not printed. 

217. Return to an Order of the House of June 7, 1922, for a Return showing: — 1. What 

pensions have been jiaid by the Government, in the county of Middlesex, during the 
fiscal year 1921-22. 2. To whom such pensions were paid and their home addresses. 
3. The amount paid in pensions. Presented June 27, 1922. Mr. Drummond. 

Not 2}rinted. 

218. Return to an Address to His Excellency the Governor General of the 12th June, 1922, 

for a copy of all letters, telegrams, petitions, memoranda. Orders in Council, Minutes 
of Council, and other documents in the possession, or under the control of the Govern- 
ment of Canada or of any dei>artment thereof, of date subsequent to April 30. 1920, 
relating to the proposed reclamation of the area in the province of British Columbia 
and the state of Idaho known as the Kootenay Flats. Presented June 27, 1922. Mr. 
Humphrey Not printed. 

219. Partial Return to an Order of the Senate of the 22nd March, 1922, for a statement 

showing the number of employees appointed in the different departments of the 
Government each year since 1911, up to 1922, and the increase of cost of the Civil 
Service since 1911. Presented June 27, 1922. Hon. Mr. David Not printed. 



25 

43746 — 3 



12 GEORGE V 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 33 



A. 1922 



DEPARTMENT 



OF 



Public Printing and Stationery 



ANNUAL REPORT 



FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED MARCH 31 



1921 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF PARLIAMENT 




OTTAWA 

F. A ACLAND 

PRINTER TO THE KING'S MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY 

192 1 



'No. 33—1922 



12 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 33 A. 1922 



To General His Excellency the Right Honourable Lord Byng of Vimy, G.C.B., 
G.C.M.G., M.V.O., Governor General and Commander in Chief of the 
Dominion of Canada. 

May it Please Your Excellency, — 

The undersigned has the honour to present to your Excellency the 
Annual Report of the Department of Public Printing and Stationery for the 
year ended March 31, 1921. 

I have the honour to be, 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

G. D. ROBERTSON, 
November 10, 1921. Minister of Labour. 



33 — 15 m 



12 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 33 A. 1922 



Ottawa, November 10, 1921. 



The Hon. Senator G. D. Robertson, LL.D., 
Minister of Labour. 



Sir, — I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Department 
of Public Printing and Stationery for the year ended March 31, 1921. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

F. A. ACLAND, 
King's Printer and Controller of Stationery. 



IV 



12 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 33 A. 1922 



PRINTING BRANCH 

F. A. AcLAND, Esq., 

King's Printer and Controller of Stationery. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit a report of the work executed for 
Parliament and the various departments in the Government Printing Bureau 
during the fiscal year ending March 31, 1921, contained in the following 
tabulated statements: — 

1. Annual reports. 

2. Supplementary reports. 

3. Routine parliamentary work. 

4. House of Commons and Senate Debates. 

5. Statutes. 

6. Canada Gazette. 

7. Voters' lists. 

8. Pamphlet and miscellaneous book-work. 

9. Statement of other letterpress departmental work. 

10. Halftone plates or other insertions in annual and supplementary 

reports. 

11. Statement of books bound. 

12. Pads made. 

13. Making and stamping of prepaid Post Office envelopes. 

14. Die stamping of letter and note headings and envelopes. 

15. Loose-leaf work. 

16. Comparative statement of pressvvork. 

In addition to the divisions of work covered by the foregoing statements, 
there are the map engraving and stereotyping divisions. 

The work of the map engraving division consists of the engraving of maps, 
charts, etc., of various sizes on copper, making changes and additions to 
existing plates, printing transfers for lithographers, engraving and printing 
persoral cards, and engravirg plates on steel for die stampirg. The cost of 
operating this division during the year 1920-21 amounted to .$47,151.83. 

The work of the stereotyping division consists of the making of matrices 
and stereotype plates for printing, making alterations to existing plates, and 
the manufacture of some metal equipment for use in the typesetting divisions. 
The cost of operation for the year 1920-21 amounted to $21,849.23. 

Respectfully submitted, 

P. M. DRAPER, 

Director and Superintendent of Printing. 

Ottawa, November 9, 1921. 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 



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SESSIONAL PAPER No. 33 



3,810 56 

2,204 59 

704 40 


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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR AND SUPERINTENDENT OF PRINTING 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 33 

Table No. 3. — Statement showing the Routine ParHamentary Worlc, 

Year 1920-21. 



Title of Document 


Number 

of 
Copies 


Number 

of 

Pages 


Requisitioned for 


Parlia- 
ment 


Depart- 
ment 


Stock 


Sess. 
Papers 


Votes and Proceedings 

Proces-verbaux 


1,383* 

418* 
1,065* 

253* 
1.250* 

292* 
1.507* 

.393* 
1,512* 

378* 
1,064* 

307* 
1,3.32* 

322* 

2,360 

600 
43,775 

12,789 
400 
1,982 
496 
750 
1.50 
154 
60 


964 

978 
2,294 
2,286 
718 
734 
742 
733 
568 
564 
990 
996 
754 
760 

184 

64 
1,937 

1,320 

644 

1,088 

1,176 

1,040 

1,160 

500 

484 


1,383 

418 
1,065 

253 
1,256 

292 
1,507 

393 
1.512 

378 
1,0&4 

307 
1,332 

322 

2,360 

500 
43,775 

12,789 
































Proces-verbaux des Seances du S^nat 








Public Bills .... 








Bills d'int^ret public? 

Private Bills 








Bills d'int6ret prive . . ; 








Third Reading Bills (Commons) 
















Third Reading Bills (Senate) 








Bills en troisieme lecture (Senat) 








Returns (lor distribution or Sessional Papers, 
either or both) 








Reponses (pour distribution ou pour insertion 
aux documents parlementaiies ou pour Tune 






100 


Divorce Cases (aggregate) 








Printing of various Committee sittings (aggre- 
gate) 








House of Commons Journal, 1920 






400 










1,982 


Annexe No 1, 2ieme session, 1919 








496 


Appendix No. 7, 2nd session. 1919 

Annexe No 7, 2ieme session, 1919 

Senate Journals, 1920 


110 
100 




250 
50 


390 

154 


Journaux du Senat, 1920 








60 












Totals 

Totals (March 31, 1920) . . . 


74,998 
142,122 


23,678 
28,809 


71,116 
129,122 


'"'225' 


300 
5,740 


3,582 
7,035 







•Average for the session. 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

12 GEORGE V, A. 192.2 



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C-; 










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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR AND SUPERINTENDENT OF PRINTING 7 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 33 

Table No. 5. — Statement of the work on the Statutes, Year 1920-21. 





Number 

of 
Copies 


Number 

of 

Pages 


Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 


Cost 




The Statutes 

Volumes 1 and 2, 1918 (English) 

Volumes 1 and 2, 1919, 2nd session, and for 1920 (English). 
Volumes 1 and 2, 1919, 2nd session, and for 1920 (French) . 


994 
4,. 500 
1,200 


486 
966 
986 


483,084 
4,347,000 
1,183,200 


$ cts. 

1,009 66 
7,218 78 
3,566 90 


Totals 


6,694 
9,994 


2.438 
2,498 


6,013,284 
6,844,096 


11,795 34 


Totals (March 31, 1920) 


17,757 26 







Table No. 6.- 



-Statemcnt of the work on the Canada Gazette for the Fiscal 
Year 1920-21. 





Aggregate 

Annual 

Issue 


Number of 
Pages in 
Volume 






119,960 
31,440 
46,670 


5.440 




398 


Extras 


54 






Totals . 


198,070 
181,060 


5,892 


Totals (March 31, 1920) 


4,898 







Table No. 7.— Voters' Lists. (Nore rnnted in 1920-21.) 



8 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

Table No. 8. — Return of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, Year 1920-21 

(copies and pages aggregate). 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Advisor!/ Research Council — 



English 



Some Problems of the Fox Raising Industry 

Report of the Administrative Chairman of the Honorary Advisory 
Council for Scientific and Industrial Research of Canada, 
1919-20 



French 

Quelques problemes relatifs a I'industrie de I'elevage des renards. , 

AgricultMre — ■ 

Engush 

The European Corn Borer (No. ]S) 

Fruit and Vegetable Crop Report (.5 issues) 

Boring Caterpillars affecting Corn. &c. (Circular No. 14) 

Maple Sugar Industry in Canada (Pamphlet No. 8) 

Summary of a Typical Address by Dr. Jas. W. Robertson 

List of Publications available for Distribution 

The Cooling of Milk for Cheesemaking (Bulletin No. 22) 

Butter Scoring Contest (Bulletin No. 56) 

Fruit and Fruit Packages 

Instructions and Interpretations regarding the Regulations Govern- 
ing the Inspection of Meats 

Publications Index Book (Pamphlet No. 7) 

Report of the Dominion Entomologist and Consulting Zoologist, 
1917 and 1918 

An Act to amend the Inspection and Sale Act, 1920 

An Act to regulate the Sale and Inspection of Commercial Feeding 
Stuffs. Bran, Shorts, &c 

An Act to amend The Civil Service Act, 1918, and The Civil Service 
Amendment Act, 1919 

An Act to provide for the Retirement of Certain Members of the 
Public Service 

The Feeding Stuffs Act with the Regulations made by the Minister 
of Agriculture 

An Act to regulate the Sale and Inspection of Commercial Feeding 
Stuffs, Bran, Shorts, etc 

Agricultural Gazette of Canada, 1920-21 (10 issues) 

The Dairy Industry Act. 1914, and Regulations (Circular No. 28) 

Information for Farmers, Ranchers and Stock Owners regarding 
Cattle Mange, &c., 1920 

.\n Act respecting Commercial Feeding Stuffs 

The Finch Dairy Station — Report of Progress (Bulletin No. 55). . . 

The Progress of Cow Testing (Bulletin No. 58) 

The Meat and Canned Foods Act and the Regulations made there- 
under — Governing the Inspection of Meats 

Report on an Investigation into Some of the Possibilities of the 
Recovery and Utilization of the Fibre from the Straw of Flax. 

Supplement to the Canada Gazette 

.Simple Methods for the Storage of Ice (Bulletin No. 57) 

Federal .\ssistance to Horse Breeding 

The Meat and Canned Foods Act and the Regulations made there- 
under — ^Governing the Inspection of Meats 

The Canadian Record of Performance for Pure-Bred Dairy Cattle 
— Regulations. Standards and Records of Cows Qualified for 
Registration (No. 12) 

Studies in North American Cleorini — Geometridae (Bulletin 
No. 18) 

Information for Farmers and Ranchers regarding Tick Paralysis 
in British Columbia (Bulletin No. 28) 

Keeping Dairy Herd Records (Circular No. 25) 

Dourine in Canada, 1904-1920 

The "Egg Case Plan" and Its Use (Pamphlet No. 8) 

Weeds and Weed Seeds (Bulletin No. S-8) 

Carried forward 



1,000 
3,000 

1,000 



25, 000 

50,000 

2,000 

7,500 

10,000 

25,000 

5,000 

3,000 

12,000 

1,000 
5,000 

4,500 
500 

400 

100 

50 

23,100 

1.000 
5G..S80 

2,ocn 

5,150 

2,000 

3,000 

112,200 

5, 000 

500 

3,000 

25,500 

6,000 

2,000 



10,505 

1,200 

2,000 

10,000 

2,000 

5,100 

10,060 



12 
100 

16 



4 
82 
16 
48 
20 



52 

48 



24 
4 



4 

4 

16 

16 

854 

10 

16 
16 
12 
16 

36 

16 

16 

8 

32 

36 

104 

64 

6 
12 

58 
16 



443,745 



1,910 



12,000 
300,000 

16,000 



100,000 

821,600 

32,0C0 

360,000 

200, 000 

200, 000 

40.000 

48.000 

96,000 

52,000 
240,000 

108, 000 
2,000 

3,200 

400 

200 

369,600 

16,000 

4.822,260 

20, 000 

82,400 

32,000 

36,000 

1,795,200 

180,000 

8,000 

48,000 

204,000 

192,000 

72,000 



1,092,520 
76,800 

12,000 
120,000 
116,000 

81,600 
684,080 



12,691,860 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR AND SUPERINTENDENT OF PRINTING 9 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 33 

Table No. 8. — Return of Pamphlet and Mi^cellaneou.s Book-work, Year 1920-21 
(copies and pages aggregate) — Continued. 



Description 



Number 
of 

Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Brought forward. 
Agricutture — Concluded. 



French 



Le progres du controle des vaches laitieres (bulletin n° 58) 

Registre du troupeau 

Tuberculosp aviaire (bulletin n° 18) 

Loi ayant pour objet de reglementer la vente et I'inspection des 

produits de commerce pour I'alimentation des animaux, du 

gros son, du petit son, des reooupes et de la nourriture hachee 

La conservation de la glace — Simples methodes 

Fruits et emballages pour leg fruits. 

Guide du collcctionneur d'insectes (circulaire n° 12) 

L'industrie du sucre d'erable au Canada (feuillet n** 8) 

La Gazette agricole du Canada, 1920-21 (9 issues) 

Loi ayant pour objet de reglementer la vente et Tinsipeetion des 

produits de commerce pour ralimentation des animaux, etc.. . . 
Le refroidissement du lait pour la fabrication du fromage (bulletin 

n°22) 

Publications offertes au public 

Rapport sur le concours national instructif d'appr^ciation du beurre, 

1919 (bulletin n° 56) 

La station laitiere de Finch — Rapport des travaux accomplis 

(bulletin n° 55) •. 

Supplement a \s. Gazette du Canada 

La loi des produits alimentaires pour les animaux et reglements 

etablis par le ministre de I'Agriculture, septembre 1920 
Aide fed^rale a I'elevage du cheval 



Air Board of Canada- 



English 



Report of the Air Board, 1919-1920 

Regulations for the Canadian Air Force and the Air Board Act, 

1920 

Depreciation and Insurance of War Type Aeroplanes and Seaplanes 

(Bulletin No. 1) " 



Board of Commerce of Canada — 

Englmh 

Report of the Board of Commerce of Canada, July 7, 1919, to March 
31, 1920 (2 issues) 

Civil Service Comrnission — 

English 

Extract from Annual Report, 1918-19 

Statement showing Number of Employees in Certain Departments 
of the Public Service for the Fiscal Year ending March 31, 1921, 
Designated in Accordance with the New Classification 
Schedules 

An Act to provide for the Retirement of certain Members of the 
Public Service (2 issues) 

An Act to amend The Civil Service Act, 1918, and The Civil Ser- 
vice Act, 1919 

Civil Service Appointments — Guide to Procedure (2 issues) 

Civil Service Reform in England, the United States and Canada. . 

Statement showing Number of Employees in Certain Departs 
ments of the Public Service for the Fiscal Year ending March 
31, 1921, Designated in Accordance with the New Classification 
Schedules 



443,745 



48, 100 
3.000 
5,000 



100 
15,000 
2,000 
500 
7,500 
9,420 

1,000 

5,000 
10,000 

2,500 

2,500 
3,000 

6,500 
500 



1,000 



200 



1,600 

1,000 

1,000 

100 

50 

1,000 

500 

1,010 



Carried forward 574,913 



1,910 



16 

20 



8 

16 

52 

796 

16 

12 

8 

16 

12 
16 

16 
36 



204 



100 



200 



4 
32 



32 



3,610 



12,691,860 



769,600 
60,000 
40,000 



800 

120,000 

16,000 

8,000 

.390, 000 

833,920 

16,000 

60, 000 
80,000 

40,000 

30, 000 
48, 000 

104,000 
18,000 



8,000 

425,952 

1,600 



160,000 

200, OCO 

36,000 

400 

200 

32, 000 

4,000 

32,320 



16,226,652 



10 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

12 GEORGE V, A. 192 



Table No. 8. — Return of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, Year 1920-21 
(copies and pages aggregate) — Continued. 



Description 


Number 

of 
Copies 


Number 

of 

Pages 


Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 


Brought forward .... 


514,913 


3,610 


16,226,652 


Civil Service Commission— Concluded. 








French 








Loi statuant sur la mise ^ la retraite de certains membres du seri'ice 
public _ . . 


50 

300 
500 


4 

S 
32 


200 


La rfeforme du Serrice civil en Angleterre, aux Etats-Unis et au 


2,400 


Guide administratif pour nominations au Service civil 


16, 000 


Chief Electoral Officer— 

English 




Dominion Elections Act with the Instructions of the Chief Electoral 
OflScer and the Tariff of Fees 


3,000 
500 

25,320 
500 


180 
8 

196 

8 


540,000 


An Act to revive and amend The Naturalization Act, 1914 

Instructions of the Chief Electoral Officer for Votes to be taken on 

a Question submitted under the Canada Temperance Act, Ac. 

Supplement to the Canada Gazette 


4,000 

4,962,720 
4,000 


French 




Loi des elections f^dferales avec les instructions du directeur g^n^ral 


500 


186 


93,000 


Commission of Consemalion— 




English 








Conservation— Monthlv Bulletin (11 issues) 


117,125 

36,100 

8,062 

5,030 


52 
96 
16 
90 


507,700 


Town Planning and Conservation of Life (4 issues) 


866, 400 


Municipal and Real Estate Finance in Canada 


128,992 


Conservation of Soil Fertility and Soil Fibre— Report of Conference 


452.700 


French 










11,320 
3,500 


32 
96 


45,280 


Amfenagement des Villes et Conservation de la Vie (4 issues) 


84,400 


Cuetoms— 








English 








Memorandum re An Act to amend the Special War Revenue Act, 
1915 


8,000 
8,000 
2, 000 
10,000 
3,500 

5,000 

150 
6,000 


28 
8 

50 
8 
S 

8 

72 
12 


224, 000 


Tariff Changes. 1920 


64,000 


List of Ports with Outports and Preventive Stations 


100,000 


Memorandum — Resolution affecting Special War Revenue Act, 1915 
The Oleomargarine Act and Regulations thereunder 


80,000 
28, 000 


Inspection of Fruits, Vegetables and Milk when Imported or 

Exported (Memorandum) 


40,000 


Extract from the Annual Report of the Department of Customs and 
Inland Revenue, 1919-20— Part II, Inland Revenue 


10.800 


List of Ports of Customs and Excise 


72, 000 


Editorial Committee— 




English 








Reports of the Editorial Committee (Nos. 17 to 28) 


1,000 

1,000 
500 


20 

24 
8 


20,000 


Editorial Committee on Government Publications — Inventory 
No. 1 


24,000 




4,000 






Carried forward 


831,870 


4,860 


24,601,244 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR AND SUPERINTENDENT OF PRINTING 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 33 



11 



Table No. 8. — Return of Pamphlot .and Miscellaneous Book-work, Year 1920-2] 
(copies and pages aggregate) — Continued. 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Brought forn'ard. 
Experimental Farms — 



English 



Wild Rice (Bulletin No. 421) 

Principal Poisonous Plant of Canada (Bulletin No. 39) 

Seasonable Hints (5 is.sues) 

Alkali Soils, their Nature and Reclamation (Bulletin No. 4) 

Grande Prairie's Capabilities (Pamphlet No. 29) ■ 

The French-Canadian Horse fBiilletin No. 95) 

Farm Business in Quebec, 1919-20 (Bulletin No. 96) 

Wintering Bees in Canada (Bulletin No. 43) 

Tobacco Growing in Canada (Bulletin No. 25) 

Tobacco Seed Beds (Bulletin No. 21) 

Bush Fruits and their Cultivation in Canada (Bulletin No. 94) 

Flue-Cured Tobacco in Canada (Bulletin No. 38) 

Alfalfa Growing in the Vancouver Island Districts (Circular No 

18) 

Beekeeping in Canada (Circular No. 18) 

Facts about Honey (Circular No. 51) 



French 

Les ressources de Grande-Praiiie (feuillet n° 29) . . . . 

Conseils pour la saison (4 issues) 

Le riz sauvage (bulletin n° 42) 

L'hivernage des abeilles au Canada (bulletin n° 43). 

Les fermes de Quebec, 1919-20 (bulletin n° 96) 

Le cheval canadien (bulletin n° 95) 



External Affairs- 



English 



Confidential documents (aggregate) 

Finance — 

Stipply BiU No. 3 

Civil Service Insurance Act — Regulations — Table of Premium 

Rates 

Budget Speech, 1920 

An Act to amend The Income War Tax Act, 1917 

Supply Bill No. 4 

An Act to levy a tax on Business Profits 

An Act to amend The Income War Tax Act. 1917 

Regulations respecting Bonds of the Dominion of Canada 

French 

Loi modifiant la Loi de lTmp6t sur le Revenu, 1917 

Bill des subsides 

Health— 

English 

Official List of Laboratory Bulletins 

Memorandum — Opium and Narcotic Drug Act and Regulations, 

1920... 

General Circular of Information concerning Venereal Diseases to 

the Medical Profession of Canada (No. 1), (2 issues) 

Information for Men — Syphilis and Gonorrhoea (Pamphlet No. 1), 

(2 issues) 

Information for Young Women about Sex Hygiene (Pamphlet No. 2) 

(2 issues) 

Carried forward 



831,870 



15,000 

19,900 

599,810 

2,000 

7,500 

3,000 

13,150 

12,000 

5,000 

5.000 

60,000 

5,050 

13,200 
25, 000 
25,000 



1,000 

247,200 

5,000 

5.200 

• .S8,400 

10,000 



665 



500 

10,000 

15. 175 

100,000 

500 

4,000 

25,000 

15,000 



15,000 
100 



500 
10,010 
14,000 
20,000 
20,000 



4,8 



20 
132 
80 
16 
4 
24 
16 
12 
32 
52 
56 
44 



4 
64 
24 
16 
16 
24 



900 



12 
40 

8 

100 

16 

4 



106 



24,601,244 



300,000 

2,626,800 

9,596,960 

32,000 

30. 000 

72,000 

210,400 

144,000 

160,000 

260,000 

3,300,000 

222,200 

105,600 
100,000 
100,000 



4,000 

3,955,200 

120,000 

83,200 

614,400 

240,000 



41,373 



2,000 

120,000 
607,000 
800, 000 
50, 000 
64,000 
100,000 
120,000 



120,000 
10,600 



12,000 
120,120 
112,000 
160,000 
160,000 



2,199,730 



6,778 



49,537,097 



12 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 



Table No. 8. — Return of Pamphlet and IMiscellaneous Book-work, Year 1920-21 
(copies and pages aggregate — Continued. 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Brought forward 

Health — Conclud ed . 

E.vGLisH — Concluded. 

Information for Parents — Teaching of Sexual Hygiene to Children 

(Pamphlet No. .'5) 

Information for Parents — Teaching of Sexual Hygiene to Children 

(Pamphlet No. 3) ' 

Venereal Diseases — VVasserman Test XNo. 2) 

Venereal Diseases — Wasserman Test (No. 2) 

Venereal Diseases — Microscopic Examination (No. 3), (2 issues). 
Bulletins: — 

Alcoholic Patent and Proprietary Medicines (No. 410) 

White Paints (No. 424) 

Registered Stock Feed (No. 4.38) 

Baking Powder ( No. 439) 

Pepper— Black and White (No. 440) 



French 

Memorandum concernant la loi de I'opium et des drogues narco- 

tiques et reglements 

Maladies vencrionnes — Circulaire g^nerale de renseignements sur 

ces maladies — Pamphlet destinfe a la profession m^dicale du 

Canada (n° I ) 

Maladies vcneriennes — Renseignements pour les hommes — 

Syphilis et blennorragie (Pamphlet n° I), (2 issues) 

Maladies vcneriennes — Renseignements pour les jeunes filles sur 

I'hygiene se.xuelle (Pamphlet n° II) 

Maladies veneriennes — Renseignements pour les parents — L'ensei- 

gnement de I'hygiene sexuelle aux enfants (Pamphlet n° III), 

(3 issues) 

Maladies vcneriennes — Examen microscopique (n" III) 

Traitement de la narcomanie 

Bulletins: — 

Aliments du betail enregistrfis (n° 438) 

Poudre h pate (n° 439) 

Poivre — Noir et blanr (n° 440) 



House of Com7noiis — 



English 



An Act to consolidate and amend The Railway Act. (Bill "A" 

of the Senate. 1919) 

Speech of Right Hon. Sir George Foster, Minister of Trade and 

Commerce, on Address in Reply to Governor General's Speech, 

Feb. 16, 1921 

Directory of Telephone and Room Numbers, 1920— House of 

Commons (2 issues) 

Joint Committee on Printing— Orders of the Day, No. 1, Session 

1920 

Commons Debates, .\pril 8. 1920 

An Act respecting the Election of Members of the House o( Commons 

and the Electoral Franchise 

Postal Guide, 1920 

Address by Dr. James Robertson 

Alphabetical Index to the Sessional Papers of the Parliament of 

Canada, 1920 

Rules of the House of Commons, 1918 

List of Reports and Returns, 1921 .. 

Unrevised Debates (extra copies) 

Directory of Telephone and Room Numbers, 1921— House of 

Commons 



2,199,730 



10,000 

7,000 

7,175 

10,000 

14,000 

1,000 
1,000 
4,000 
.5,000 
5,000 



5,000 

3,000 

10,000 

5,000 



13,000 
3.000 
1,000 

300 
2,000 
2,000 



500 

1,000 

1,000 

25 
200 

1,000 

400 

2,500 

2,900 

300 

400 

20 

1,000 



6,778 



16 



8 
20 



16 

12 

24 

8 
48 

232 
626 

24 

24 

98 

8 

88 

24 



49,537,097 



80, 000 



12 
12 

8 
8 


84,000 

86, 100 

80,000 

112,000 


8 
20 

8 
16 

4 


8,000 
20, 000 
32,000 
80, 000 
20,000 



80, 000 

24,000 
40,000 
40,000 



104,000 

24,000 

4,000 

2,400 
40,000 
16,000 



8,000 

12,000 

24,000 

200 
9,600 

232,000 

250,400 

60, 000 

69, 600 

29,400 

3,200 

1,760 

24,000 



Carried forward 2,319,450 



8,210 



51,237,757 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR AND SUPERINTENDENT OF PRINTING 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 33 



13 



Table No. 8.— Return of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, Year 1920-21 
(copies and pages aggregate) — Continued. 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Brought forward 

House of Commons — Concluded. 

Bilingual 

List of Members of the House of Commons — Liste des membres 
de la Chambre des Communes, 1921 

French 

Index alphab^tique et numferique des documents parlementaires 

du Canada, 1920 

Index alphabetique et liste des documents parlementaires, 1919. . 
Loi concernant 1 'Election des dfeput^s k la Chambre des Communes 

et le ccns electoral 

Guide postal. 1920 

Commission royale chargee He s'enquerir au sujet des courses de 

chevaux — Rapport de .J. G. Rutherford. C.M.G., commissaire. 
Rapport du ministcre du R^tablissement des Soldats dans la vie 

civile, decembre 1919 

Loi modifiant la loi speciale des revenus de guerre, 1915 

Ivimigralion and CoJonization — 

English 

Immigration Facts and Figures 

Chinese Immigration Act and Regulations 

Canada Descriptive Atlas 

What British Editors Say about Canada 

Indian Affairs — 

English 

Indian Land Mining Regulations 

The Indian Act, 1906 

Inland Revenue — 

English 

Excise Taxes — Alphabetical List of Articles Pubicct to Excise 

Taxes and List of Exemptions from Sales Tax (2 issues) 

An Act to amend the Inland Revenue Act 

An Act to amend The Special War Revenue Act, 1915 (3 issues) . . 

An Act to amend The Special War Revenue Act, 1915 

Tariff Changes, 1920 

Official List of Licensed Manufacturers 

French 

Loi modifiant la Loi des Revenus de guerre, 1915 

Insurance — 

English 

List of Securities held by Insurance Companies in Canada, De- 
cember 31, 1920 

Annual Statement required from Fraternal Benefit Societies 

Safeguard Canadian Industr>' 

Tables of Bond Values 

Annual Statements required from British and Foreign Companies 

Annual Statement required from Canadian Companies 

Canada Gazette extra 

List of Insurance Companies Licensed to do Business in Canada 
under The Insurance Act. 1917 (4 issues) 

Carried forward 

33^2 



2,319,450 



800 



,075 
105 



275 
100 



350 



360 
390 



1,500 

1.000 

104,300 

100, 000 



100 
500 



201,125 

2,000 

122,000 

500 

10,000 

860 



25,000 



600 

80 

25,150 

1,500 

500 

400 

80, 100 

2,375 



8,210 



20 



32 
16 



244 
388 



178 
32 



24 



64 



16 



144 
22 
12 

136 

28 

40 

3 

16 



51.237.757 



16,000 



34.400 
1,680 

67, 100 
38,800 

34,300 

64,080 
12,480 



36,000 

20,000 

8,344,000 

2,000,000 



2,800 
40,800 



4,827,000 
16,000 

1,952,000 
16,000 
80,000 
55, 040 



400.000 



86,400 

1,760 

301 800 

204,000 

14,000 

16,000 

240,300 

42,935 



3,002,495 



10,039 



70,203.432 



14 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

Table No. 8. — Return of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, Year 1920-21 
(copies e'zd pages aggregate) — Continued. 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 
of 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Brought forward. 



InlerioT- 



English 



Hydrometrie 3ur\-ey of Manitoba for the Climatic Years 1916-17 
and 1917-18 

Hydrometrie Survey of Manitoba for the Climatic Year 1918-19, . 

Hydrometrie Surv-ev of British Columbia for the Climatic Years 
191-6-17, and 1917-18— Water Resources Paper No. 23 

Hydrometrie Survey of British Columbia for the Climatic Year 
1918-19 — Water Resources Paper No. 2.5 

Rules and Regulations of the Board of Examiners for the Dominion 
Land Surveyors 

Micmac Place-Names in the Maritime Provinces and Gaspfe 
Peninsula 

Regulations governing Placer Mining in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, 
Alberta and the N.\t.T. of Canada 

Dominion Lands Hand-Book, 1920 

Adjustment of Geodetic Triangulation in tiie Provinces of Ontario 
and Quebec 

Publications of the Dominion Observatory (aggregate) 

The Birds of a Manitoba Garden 

Report of the Superintendent of the Geodetic Survey, 1919 

Publications of the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory (aggre- 
gate) 

The Forests of Canada 

New Oil Fields of Northern Canada 

Index to Volume 39 of Orders in Council for Year 1917 

Index to Volume 40 of Orders in Council for Year 1918 

Lists of Unoccupied Farms for Sale — Province of Alberta (aggre- 
gate) 

Lists of Unoccupied Farms for Sale — Province of Manitoba (aggre- 
gate) 

Lists of Unoccupied Farms for Sale — Province of Saskatchewan 
(aggregate) 

List of Farms for Sale — Province of Nova ,Scotia 

List of Farms for Sale — Province of Prince Edward Island 

Lists of School Lands to be offered for Sale, &c. (aggregate) 

Geographic Board Decisions (3 issues) 

The Care of the Woodlot (Bulletin No. 69) 

Ministers of Agriculture give Views on Bird Protection 

Forest Fires in Canada, 1918 (Bulletin No. 70) 

Regulations Governing the Use of Motor Vehicles in the Dominion 
Parks 

Act respecting a certain Convention between His Majesty and the 
United States of America for the Protection of Migratory Birds 
in C"anada and the United States 

Regulation for the Disposal of Petroleum and Natural Gas Rights 
&c 

Report of the Commissioner of Dominion Parks (Years ending 
March 31, 1918 and 1919) 

Regulations for the Leasing and Administration of Lands con- 
taining Limestone, Granite, Slate, Marble, &c 

A Summary of Regulations and Departmental Rulings relating to 
Dominion Lands for the Guidance of Agents, Sub-Agents and 
Other Officials (No. 15) 

Migratory Birds Convention Act (with amendments) 

An Act respecting Irrigation 

A New Field for Exploitation — Central British Columbia, Canada 

Bird Houses and their < >ccupants 

Precise Levelling — Certain Lines in Manitoba and Saskatchewan 
(No. 6) 

Natural Resources of Nova Scotia, 1920 

Methods of Communication Adapted to Forest Protection 

Carried forward 



3,002,495 



1.500 
1,515 

1,500 

1,506 

1,000 

100 

2.000 
50,000 

1,000 

1,400 

10.000 

1,000 

6,090 

500 

10,100 

35 

35 

25,130 

20,000 

40,000 
2,000 
1,000 

33,500 
1,125 
5,000 

15,000 
2,000 

5,000 



2,500 
3,000 
2,000 
3,100 



1,2.50 

40, 150 

500 

9.943 
15,000 

800 

10,000 

1,500 



10,039 



184 
96 

328 

234 

28 

120 

20 

48 

192 

72 

8 

80 

98 
36 
8 
96 
68 

168 

204 

390 

28 

8 

112 
28 
52 
16 
20 

20 



10 
12 
80 
12 



100 
16 
28 

120 
12 

32 

72 
248 



70,203,432 



276,000 
145,440 

492,000 

352,404 

28,000 

12,000 

40, 000 
2,400,000 

192,000 
50,400 
80.000 
80,000 

49,500 

18,000 

80,800 

3,360 

2,380 

868,040 

1,020,000 

1,950.000 

56, 000 

S.OOO 

294,000 

11,500 

260.000 

240. 000 

40,000 

100,000 



25,000 
.36.000 
160.000 
37,200 



125,000 

642,400 

14,000 

, 193, 160 

ISO. 000 

25.600 
720. 000 
372,000 



3,331,274 



13,543 



82,883,616 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR AND SUPERINTENDENT OF PRINTING 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 33 



15 



Table No. 8. — Return of Pami^hlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, Year 1920-21 
(Copies and pages aggregate) — Continued. 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Brought forward. 



Interior — Concluded. 

English — Concluded. 

The Peace River District, Canada, Its Resources and Opportuni- 
ties 

Dominion Forestry Branch Message Code 

Supplement to the Canada Gazette 

Tree-Planting on the Prairies of Manitoba, Saskatchewan and 
Alberta (Bulletin No. 1) ... 

The Testing of Thermometers at the Laboratory of the Dominion 
Lands Surv-eys (Bulletin No. 45) 

Report of the Directcr of Water Power, 1917-18 and 1918-19 

The Empire Timber Exhibition (Circular No. 12) 

Fbench 

Les oiseaux d'un jardin Manitobain 

Les Ministres de ['Agriculture donnent des id6es sur la protection 

des oiseaux 

Renseignements pour le public — Division des terres ffedferales, 

edition du 3 avril 1920 

Maisons d'oiseaux et leurs occupants 

Justice — 

English 

Reports of the Exchequer Court of Canada. Vol. 20, No. 1 

Reports of the Supreme Court of Canada, Vol. 60, No. 1, 2, 3 and 4 
Internment Operations, 1914-1920— Report by Major-General Sir 
William Otter, K.C.B., C.V.O., Director Internment Opera- 
tions 

Labour — 

English 

Labour Organization in Canada — Ninth Annual Report, 1919 

The Industrial Disputes Investigation Act, 1907 

Rates of Wages and Hours of Labour — Street Railway Conductors 

and Motormen, 1914-1919 

Index to Labour Gazette, Vol. XX, 1920 

French 

Loi des enqu^tes en maticre de difTerends industriels, 1907 

Marine — 

English 

Regulations respecting Masters and Mates 

Tide Tables and Information connected with the Ship Channel 

froni Father Point to Montreal, 1920 

Regulation relating to the Inspection of Hulls and Equipment of 

Steamboats 

Rules of the Road for the Great Lakes 

International Rules of the Road 

By-laws of the Pilotage District of St. John, N.B., 1920 

By-laws of the Pilotage District of Halifax, N.S., 1920 

Canada Shipping Act 

The Temperature and Precipitation of Alberta, Saskatchewan and 

Manitoba 

Index to Notice to Mariners (Nos. 1 to 96 inclusive) 1920 

Carried forward 

33—2^ 



3,331,274 



30,025 
3,962 
1,000 

5,000 

500 
1,512 
3.000 



3,000 

3,000 

2,500 
5,000 



1,000 
5,500 



1,000 



5,725 
1,000 

100 
10,100 



1,000 



500 

1,000 

200 
1,000 
500 
100 
200 
200 

1,200 
300 



13,543 



64 



52 
16 



122 
672 



16 



304 
20 



28 
24 



24 



64 

96 

12 
20 
24 
20 
20 
40 

172 
16 



82,883,616 



1,561,300 

332,808 

8,000 

320, 000 

8, 000 
96,768 
24.000 



24,000 

48, 000 

130,000 
80,000 



122,000 
3,696,000 



16,000 



1,740,400 
20,000 

2,800 
242,400 



24, 000 



32,000 

96,000 

2,400 
20,000 
12,000 
2,000 
4,000 
8,000 

206,400 
4,800 



3,420,398 



15,625 



91,767,692 



16 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRIATINO AND STATIONERY 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 



Table No. 8. — Return of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, Year 1920-21 
(copies and pages aggregate) — Continued. 



Oescription 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 
of 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Brought forward. 



Marine — Concluded. 



Bilingual 



Supplement to List of Vessels, 191*— Supplement k la liste des 
navires, 1919 (aggregate) 

Supplement to List of Vessels, 1920 — Supplement k la liste des 
navires, 1920 

Supplement to List of Vessels, 1921 — Supplement i, la liste des 
navires. 1921 , 



3.420.398 



2,250 
250 
250 



Militia and Defence — 



English 



The Return of the Troops— A Plain Account of the Demobilization 
of the Canadian Expeditionary Force 

Advantages of the Permanent Active Militia — Conditions on 
which Young Men are Invited to Join the Permanent Active 
Militia of Canada 

Instructions tor Practice — Field, Heavy and Siege Artillerj', 1921 

Report on the Physiotherapeutic Work in the Various Military 
Hospitals in Canada 

Pay and Allowance Regulations. 1920 

Instruction for Practice, Horse, Field and Heavy Artillery 

Memorandum for Camps of Instructions, 1920 

Regulations for the Equipment of the Canadian Militia, 1920 — 
Part II, Section 2 (b) 

Second Supplement to Librarj- Catalogue, 1918 

Annual Report of the Commandant, Royal Military College of 
Canada, 1920 

The Vickcrs Machine Gun 

List of Regulations and Training Manuals issuable to (a) Permanent 
Force (b) Active Militia (No. 71) 

Sale of Equipment at the Dominion Rifle Factory. Cove Fields, 
Quebec, P.Q. (List No. 27) 

Regulations for the Equipment of the Canadian Militia, 1920 — 
Part II, Section 2 (e) 

Standing Orders of the Royal Canadian Dragoons, 1920 

Standing Rules for Sergeant's Mess, Royal Canadian Dragoons 
Toronto 

Scales of Issue of Barrack Equipment — (Part I and II) 

Studies in the Regeneration of Denervated Mammalian Muscle- 
Effects of Massage and Electrical Treatment 

Standing Orders of Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry. . . 

Index to Canadian Expeditionary Force Routine Orders — January 2 
to December 31, 1919— (Part II) 

Index — Appointments, Promotions and Retirements (January 1 to 
December 31, 1919) 

Canadian Battlefields Memorials Commission — Conditions of 
Competition in Design for Eight Memorial Monuments to be 
erected in France and Belgium, December 1, 1920 

Militia General Orders, 1920-21 (aggregate) 

Appointments, Promotions and Retirements, 1920-21 (aggregate).. 



French 

Ordres gSnferaux de la Milice, 1920-21 (aggregate) 

Nominations, promotions et retraites. 1920-21 (aggregate) 
Corps de cadets des ecoles 

Carried forward 



1,000 



2,500 
500 

500 
5,000 
1,000 
5,000 

800 
150 

100 
1,000 

2,000 

10,000 

200 
1,000 

1.000 
600 

800 
200 

1,000 

1,200 



2,000 
51,800 
57,335 



4.700 
5,156 
1,000 



3,580,689 



15,625 



180 



16 

28 

56 
176 

52 
112 

80 



32 
32 



20 
10 



72 

48 



20 
64 



20 
44 



104 
192 



106 
464 
934 



538 

1,008 

16 



20,145 



91,767,« 



64 


17,000 


12 


3,000 


12 


3,000 



180,000 

40, 000 
14,000 

28,000 
880,000 

52,000 
560,000 

64,000 
1,200 

3,200 
32,000 

40,000 

100,000 

14,400 
48,000 

20,000 
38,400 

16,000 
8,800 

104,000 

•230,400 



212,000 

572,200 

1,191,100 



54,000 

101,816 

16,000 



96,412,208 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR AND SUPERINTENDENT OF PRINTING 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 33 



17 



Table No. 8.— Return of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, Year 1920-21 
(copies and pages aggregate) — Continued. 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Brought forward. 



3,580,689 



Mines — 



English 



Report of the Explosives Division of the Department of Mines, 1919 
Annotated Catalogue of and Guide to the Publications of the 

Geological Survey, Canada, 1845-1917 

The Reed-Wekusko Map — Area Northern Manitoba (Memoir 119) 

The Production of Coal and Coke in Canada, 1918-19 

The Malagash Salt Deposit, Cumberland County, N.S. (Memoir 

No. 121) 

Report on Some Sources of Helium in the British Empire (Bulletin 

No. 31) 

Graphite by Hugh S. Spence, M.E 

List of Metal Mines in Canada, 1920 

The Mineral Resources and Mining Industry of Canada 

Geology and Ore Deposits of Ainsworth Mining Camp, British 

Columbia (Memoir 117) 

Non-Metal Mines in Canada, 1920 

Petroleum and Natural Gas Wells, including a List of Petroleum 

Refineries 

List of Stone Quarry Operators in Canada, 1920 

Publications of the Geological Survey, 1920 

List of Coal Mines Operators in Canada, 1920 

The Production of Iron and Steel in Canada, 1919 

The Hadrosaur Edmontosaurus from the Upper Cretaceous of 

Alberta (Memoir 120) 

Report on Road Materials along the St. Lawrence River, from the 

Quebec Boundary Line to Cardinal, Ontario (Bulletin No. 32) 
A Contribution to the Description of the Fauna of the Trenton 

Group (Bulletin No. 31) 

Preliminary Report on the Mineral Production of Canada, 1920 

Summary Report, 1919 (Part B) 

Summary Report, 1919 (Part C) 

Summary Report, 1919 (Part D) 

Summary Report, 1919 (Part E) 

Summary Report, 1919 (Part 1) 

Summary Report. 1919 (Part G) 

Report of the Canadian Arctic Expedition, 1913-18 (Vol. IV 

Botany, Part E) 

Report of the Canadian Arctic Expedition, 1913-18 (Vol. Ill 

Insects, Part J) 

Report of the Canadian Arctic Expedition, 1913-18 (Vol. Ill 

Insects) 



French 

Production min^rale du Canada, 1918 

Rapport annuel de la Division dea Explosifs, 1919 

G6o!ogie et gisements min^raux d'une Partie du Canton d'Am- 

herst, Quebec (Mfimoire 113) 

Les oiseaux de I'Est du Canada (M^moire 104) 

Le bassin des Rivi&res Harricanaw et Turgeon dans le Nord du 

Quebec (M6moire 109) 



Naval Service — 



English 



Confidential Naval Orders (aggregate) 

Tide Tables for the Eastern Coast of Canada, 1921 

Instructions to Fishery Officers 

Tide Tables for Quebec and Father Point, &c., 1921 (abridged 

edition) 

The Tides and Tidal Streams 

Carried forward 



1,500 

5,000 
3,000 
3,000 

2,500 

3,000 
4,000 
1,700 
1,500 

2,500 
1,200 

1,.500 
1,500 
1,000 
1,500 
3,040 

3,510 

3,000 

2,0C0 
6,000 
3,000 
3,000 
3,000 
3,000 
3,000 
3,000 

4,500 

3,000 

4.000 



1,000 
1,000 

1,000 
1,500 

1,000 



2,502 

12,000 

500 

3,. 500 
3,900 



3,690,041 



20,145 



52 

548 
48 
44 

28 

80 

212 

16 

10 

80 
10 



84 



&4 
24 
56 

32 
24 
48 
28 
24 

16 

4 

12 



52 



56 

264 



100 



691 
68 
80 

32 
44 



23,324 



96,412,208 



78,000 

,740,000 
144,000 
132,000 

70,000 

240, 000 

848,000 

27,200 

15,000 

200,000 
12,000 

12,000 
12,000 
12,000 
18,000 
158,080 

294,840 

228,000 

128,000 

144,000 

168,000 

96,000 

72,000 

144,000 

84,000 

72,00Oi 

72,000' 

12,00fe 

48,000 



80, 000 
52, 000 



56,000 
396,000 



100,000 



66,036 

816,000 

40,000 

112.000 
171,600 



104,582,964 



18 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 



Table No. 8. — Return of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, Year 1920-21 
(copies and pages aggregate) — Continued. 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 

Number 

of Printed 

Pages 



Brought forward. 



Natal Sermce— Concluded. 

E NGLisH— Co ne lud ed . 

Tide Tables for the Pacific Coast of Canada, 1921 

Tide Tables for Vancouver and Sand Heads, B.C. (abridged 

edition) 

Tide Tables for St. John. N.B.. 1921 (abridged edition) 

The Radiotelegraph Act and Regulations issued thereunder 

Pay and Allowances for Officers and Men of the Royal Canadian 

Navy, 1920 

Bulletins of Sea Fishery Statistics (aggregate) 

Statute and By-laws of the Biological Board of Canada 

Histories of New Food Fishes— The Lumpfish (Bulletin No. 2)... 

Histories of New Food Fishes — The Angler (Bulletin No. 3) 

Histories of New Food Fishes— The Muttonfish (Bulletin No. 4) 
Established List of Printed Forms for issue to His Majesty's 

Canadian Ships and Vessels 

Canadian Naval List (aggregate) 

Annual Report on Fish Culture, i919 

The Fish Inspection Act (as amended 1920) and Regulations made 

thereunder 

Naval Orders, 1919, with index (reprint) 

Tide Tables for Nelson, Hudson Bay, and Tidal data for Hudson 

Strait and James Bay, 1921 

Genera! Orders, 1920 ". 

Judgment of the Lords of the Judicial Committee of the Privy 

Council 

Contributions to Canadian Biologv, 1918-1920 

Report of the Canadian Arctic Expedition, 1913-18 (Vol. VII : 

Crustacea, Part C) 

Report of the Canadian Arctic Expedition, 1913-18 (Vol. VII : 

Ci-ustacea. Part D) 

Report of the Canadian Arctic Expedition, 1913-18 (Vol. VII : 

Crustacea, Part E) 

Report of the Canadian Arctic Expedition, 1913-18 (Vol. VII : 

Crustacea, Part F) 

Report of the Canadian Arctic Expedition, 1913-18 (Vol. VII : 

Crustacea, Part H) 

Report of the Canadian Arctic Expedition, 1913-18 (Vol. VII : 

Crustacea, Part J) 

Report of the Canadian Arctic Expedition, 1913-18 (Vol. VII ; 

Crustacea, Part K) 

Report of the Canadian Arctic Expedition, 1913-18 (Vol. VII : 

Crustacea, Part L) 

Report of the Canadian Arctic Expedition, 1913-18 (Vol. VIII : 

MoUusks, Echinoderms, Coelenterates. (fee. Part C) 

Report of the Canadian Arctic Expedition, 1913-18 (Vol. VIII : 

MoUusks, Echinoderms, Coelenterates, &c.. Part H) 

Report of the Canadian Arctic Expedition, 1913-18 (Vol. IX : 

Annelids, Parasitic Worms, Protozoans, &o.. Part B) 

Report of the Canadian Arctic Expedition, 1913-18 (Vol. IX : 

Annelids, Parasitic Worms, Protozoans, &c.. Part C) 

Report of the Canadian Arctic Expedition, 1913-18 (Vol. IX : 

Annelids, &c.. Part D) 

Report of the Canadian Arctic Expedition, 1913-18 (Vol. IX : 

Annelids, Parasitic Worms, Protozoans, &c.. Part E) 

Report of the Canadian Arctic Expedition, 1913-18 (Vol. IX : 

Annelids, Parasitic Worms, Protozoans, &c.. Part G-H) 

Report of the Canadian Arctic Expedition, 1913-18 (Vol. X : 

Plankton, Hydrography, Tides, &c., Part C) 

French 
R^glements r^gissant la navigation afirienne. 



Loi d'inspection du poisson (telle que modififee en 1920) et rfegle- 
ments itablis sous son empire 



Carried forward 3,835,391 



3,690,041 



22,050 

10,050 

20,000 

1,500 

500 
3,600 

250 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 

250 
225 
300 

5,000 
225 

500 
262 

200 
504 

5,000 

500 

5,000 

5.000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

4,934 

5,000 

1,000 
500 



23,324 



68 

48 
24 
80 

28 
60 
4 
28 
18 
12 

24 
76 
16 

16 
60 



28 

16 

188 

4 
40 
32 

8 

8 
16 
48 
16 
16 
24 
42 

4 
24 
12 
28 
16 

144 
16 



104,582,964 



.499,400 

504,000 
480,000 
120,000 

14,000 
54,000 
1,000 
28.000 
18, 000 
12,000 

6,000 
8,700 
4,800 

80,000 
13,500 

4,000 
7,366 

3,200 
94,752 

20,000 

200,000 

160,000 

40, 000 

40,000 

80,000 

240,000 

80,000 

80,000 

120,000 

210,000 

20, 000 

120,000 

60, 000 

138, 152 

80, 000 

144,000 
8,000 



24,624 



109,375,834 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR AND SUPERINTENDENT OF PRINTING 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 33 



19 



Table No. 8. — Return of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, Year 1920-21 
(copies and pages aggregate) — Continued. 



Description 



of 
Copies 



Number Number 



of 
Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Brought forward 

Pension Commissioners — 

English 

Table of Rates for Canadian Pensions payable to Pensioners resid- 
ing in Canada, 1920 (2 issues) ^ 

Table of Rates for Canadian Pensions — Pensioners residing outside 
Canada, 1920 (2 issues) 

The Pension Act — Providing Pensions to and in respect of Members 
of the Canadian Naval, Military, and Air Forces 

Explanation of the Principal Features of the Returned Soldiers' 
Insurance Act, &c. (aggregate). 

An Act to amend the Pension Act (2 issues) 

French 

Loi modifiant la Loi des pensions 

Loi portant creation de I'assurance des soldats de retour par le 
Dominion du Canada 

Post Office— 

English 

Official Postal Guide, 1920 

Monthly Supplement to Official Postal Guide (14 issues) 

Monthly Money Order Circular, 1920-21 (10 issues) 

Instructions to Letter Carriers 

Instructions to Railway Mail Service, 1920 

Instructions for Postmasters in Charge of Accounting Post Offices, 

1911 (reprint) 

Canadian Government Annuities — A Handbook of Information. . . . 
Regulations, Table of Rates, &c. (Part I, Official Postal Guide, 

1920) 

Ontario Distribution List, 1920 

Quebec Distribution List, 1920 

Manitoba Distribution List, 1920 

Saskatchewan Distribution List, 1920 

Monthly Distribution List, 1920-21 (aggregate) 

Schedule of Mail Trains and Water Services — West of Port Arthur, 

May, 1920 

Schedule of Mail Trains and Water Services — East of Port Arthur, 

May, 1920 

Schedule of Mail Trains and Water Services — West of Port Arthur, 

October, 1920 

Schedule of Mail Trains and Water Services — East of Port Arthur, 

October, 1920 ., 

French 

Rfeglements, tarif postal, etc. (Partie I — Guide postal, 1920) 

Instructions aux facteurs, 1920 

Instructions aux commis ambulants, 1920 

Guide officiel du service postal, 1920 (2 issues) ._. . . . 

Rentes viageres du gouvernement canadien — Manuel de renseigne. 

ments 

Supplement mensuel du guide officiel postal (14 issues) 

Circulaire mensuelle des mandats-poste, 192(}-21 (11 issues) 

Public Printing and Stationery — 

English 

The Criminal Code and other selected Statutes, 1919 

Civil Service Commission — Examination Papers, 1918-19 

Official Postal Guide, 1920 , 

Carried forward , 



3,835,391 



4.50 

450 

500 

120, 550 
5,000 

1,000 
5,000 



14, 044 

221,400 

50,750 

600 

2,300 

611 
300,000 

2,980 
2,500 
1,793 
1,715 
1,782 
25,000 

1,325 

1,790 

1,356 

1,850 



830 

250 

565 

3,012 

60,000 
55,350 
14,500 



2,990 
1,800 
1,500 



4,740,934 



24,624 



10 



626 
97 

124 
20 
56 

96 

24 

242 
260 
218 

96 
144 

75 



212 
100 
212 



242 

20 

56 

1,022 

24 
134 
136 



660 
200 
382 



30. 358 



109,375 834 



6,200 

10,800 

10,000 

3,133,200 
50,000 

10,000 
40,000 



8,791,544 
1,788,200 

630,600 
12,000 

128,800 

58,656 
7,200,000 

721,160 
650, 000 
390,874 
164,640 
256, 608 
302,400 

127,200 

379,480 

135,600 

392,200 



200, 860 

5,000 

31,640 

1,830,396 

1,440,000 
466,500 
181,986 



1,973,400 
360,000 
573,000 



141,829,77 



20 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

Table No. 8. — Return of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, Year 1920-21 
(copies and pages aggregate) — Continued. 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Brought forward 

Public Printing and Stationery — Concluded. 

English — Concluded . 

Customs Tariff, 1907, and Amendments. &c ... 

Viscount Jellicoe's Report on Naval Mission to the Dominion of 
Canada (2 issues) 

The Companies Act — Office Consolidation only 

Regulations of the Civil Service Commission 

Printing Bureau Rates to be paid to Printing, Bookbinding, En- 
graving, Lithographing, and other Establishments for work 
performed for the Bureau, 1920 

The Bankruptcy Act with Amendments, 1920, together with 
Rules and Forms thereunder (2 issues) 

Dominion Land Act with Amendments _. 

An Act to amend and consolidate the Law relating to Copyright. . 

The Board of Railway Commissioners for Canada — Judgments, 
Orders, Regulations, and Rulings, Vol. X, No. 13 

House of Commons Debates (reprint) 

Price List of Government Publications 

Index to the Canada Gazette for the Year 1919-20 

Various Acts reprinted for Stock (aggregate) 



French 

Rapport du comite special nomm6 par ordre en conseil du 20 
novembre 1918, tel que recommandfe par ordre en conseil du 15 
mars 191S 

Guide ofifioiel du service postal, 1920 

Rapport du Vicointe Jellico sur la Mission Navale au Canada. . . . 

La loi de faillite, 1920, et les regies et formules s'y rattachant. . . 

Commission du Service Civil, Partie II — Papiers d'examen, 1918- 
19 

Loi modifiant et codifiant la Ifegislation concernant le droit d'auteur 

Code criminel et autres lois au Canada, 1919 



Public Works — 

English 

Report of the Ottawa River Storage, 1915 to 1920 

Purchasing Commission — 

English 

Fourth Report of the War Purchasing Commission, April 1, 1919, 

to July 1 , 1920 : 

Surplus Stores — List No. 21 



French 

Memorandum concernant le projet d'une commission d'achats pour 
le Canada 



Railways and Canals- 



English 



The Canada Highways Act (Circular No. 1), (2 issues) 

Welland >Ship Canal (under construction) also Brief Historic 
Reference to Past and Present Wellands, 1920 



French 
La loi des grandes routes du Canada (circulaire n° 1), (2 issues) . 
Carried forward 



4,740,934 



1,000 

20,150 
1,000 
1,000 



300 

3,500 
300 
200 

300 

200 

5,000 

2,080 

127,215 



100 

200 

9,9.35 

1,510 

200 
100 
996 



300 



1,225 
500 



500 

1,000 
4,000 

400 



30,358 



280 



52 
88 
48 



362 

88 
70 

18 
66 
16 
80 
4,704 



36 
3S8 

60 
214 



676 
100 

12 
8 

16 

12 
24 

12 



141,829,778 



280,000 

1,047,800 
88, 000 
48.000 



2,400 

614,100 
26,400 
14,000 

5,400 

13,200 

80,000 

166,400 

4,607.870 



3,600 
77,600 
596,100- 
323,140 

17,600 

7,200 

673,296 



30,000 



14,700 
4,000 



8.000 

12,000 
96,000 

4,800 



4,924,145 



37,956 



150,090,384 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR AND SUPERINTENDENT OF PRINTING 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 33 



21 



Table No. 8. — Return of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, Year 1920-21 
(copies and pages aggregate) — Continued. 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Brought forward 

Railway Commission — 

English 

Regulations regarding Plans and Specifications required to be 
filed with the Board 

In the Supreme Court of Canada — Case stated by the Board of 
Railway Commissioners for Canada 

Judgments, Orders, etc. (30 issues) 

Secretary of State — 

English 

The Treaty of Peace (Germany) Order, 1920 (P.C. 755, 1920) 

Address; "Some Phases of Company Law" by Thomas Mulvey, 
K.C. — Canadian Bar Association, Ottawa, 1-3 September, 1920 

General Rules and Forms under The Bankruptcy Act (2 issues) . 

An Act respecting Bankruptcy 

An Act to amend The Bankruptcy Act 

Memorandum respecting the Method of Conducting Correspondence 
between the Dominion Government and the Provincial Govern- 
ments 

The Bankruptcy Act, with Amendments, 1920, together with 
Rules and Forms thereunder 

Canada Gazette (reprint) 

The Treaty of Peace (Germany) Order, 1920 (P.C. 755, 1920) . . , 

French 

D^cret concernant le traite de pais avec I'AUemagne, 1920 

Senate — 

English 

Report on the Translation Services in Belgium and Switzerland 
by Achille Frechette, I.S.O., K.C 

Standing Rules and Orders of the Senate of Canada relating to 
Divorce 

List of Senators. 1920 

Railway Transportation to Senators of Canada, 1921 

Directory of Rooms and Telephone Numbers 

Senators of Canada, according to Seniority, 1921 (March) 

Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment — 

Engush 

Retraining Canada's Disabled Soldiers 

Handbook for the Information of Former Members of the Canadian 
and British Foices resident in the United States of America, 
December, 1920 

Medical Quarterly, October, 1919— Vol. I, No. 4 

Summary of Report — Board of Tuberculosis Consultants, Decern 
ber, 1920 

Soldier Settlement Board — 

English 

An Act to amend The Soldier Settlement Act, 1919 

An Act to amend The Soldier Settlement Act, 1919 

Trade and Commerce — 

English 

List of Licensed Elevators and Warehouses, 1919-1920 

List of Licensed Flour Mills in Canada, 1920 

Carried forward 



4,924,145 



2,000 



37,956 



50 
,900 



200 

400 
700 
500 
500 



200 

500 
5,000 
5,000 



500 



500 

500 
400 
100 
500 
600 



3,000 



20,000 
1,505 

1,000 



200 
1,500 



1,500 
300 



4 
664 



22 



20 
168 



16 



14 

168 
152 

28 



28 



194 



16 

108 



24 



152 
20 



150,690,384 



16,000 

200 
397,400 



4,400 

8,000 

117,600 

36,000 

8,000 



2,800 

84,000 
760,000 
140,000 



14,000 



4,000 

12,000 
4,800 
3,200 
4,000 

12,000 



582, 000 



320,000 
162,540 

24,000 



1,600 
6,000 



228, 000 
6,000 



4,989,200 



39,950 



153,648,924 



22 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

Table No. 8. — Return of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, Year 1920-21 
(copies and pages aggregate) — Concluded. 



Description 



Brought forward 

Trade and Commerce — Concluded. 

English — Concluded. 

Annual Index — Vol. XLVTI, Canadian Patent Office Record 

Report of the Board of Grain Commissioners for Canada, for the 

Croj)-ypai ended .\ugust 31, 1919 

Canada Grain .\ct, 1912, with .Amendments 

Report of the Dominion Grain Research Laboratory, Winnipeg, 

Manitoba 

The Dairj- Industry of Canada (Commercial Series No. 1) 

Canada-West Indies Trade Agreement (2 issues) 

"The Patent Act"— Revised Statutes of Canada, 1906 

Canada-West Indies Conference, 1920 (Appendix C) 

Trade between Canada and the British West India Colonies 

Index to Weekly Bulletin— Six months ending December 29, 1919. . 

Index to Weekly Bulletin— Six months ending June 28, 1920 

Index to Weekly Bulletin, July to December, 1920 

Report on the Grain Trade of Canada, 1919 

Australian Invoice Requirements and other Trade Regulations 

Applicable to Imports into the Commonwealth 

Inspection and Sale .\ct with Amendments to date 

Rules and Forms of the Patent and Copyright Office under the 

Trade Mark and Design Act, &c 

Fruit Statistics of Canada, 1919 

Circular of the Patent and Copyright Office, &c., with Index 

New Tariff of Trinidad and Tobago 

Canada Year Book, 1919 

Report of Proceedings of the Canada-West Indies Conference, 1920, 
.\n Art to amend and consolidate the Law relating to Copyright. . 
Directions for the Pro'secution of Trade Mark Applications under 

Rule X 

New Tariff of Canada 

Agricultural Gazette of Canada, 1920-21 (12 issues) 

Monthly Bulletin of -Agricultural Statistics, 1920-21 (12 issues) 

History of the Great War, 1914-18 

The Flour-.Milling Industry of Canada (No. 2) 

An Act to amend and consolidate the Law relating to Copyright. . 

Report of Conference on Education Statistics 

Supplement to Weekly Bulletin (aggregate) 

Weekly Bulletin. 1920'-21 (.50 issues) 

The Canadian Patent Office Record (54 weekly issues) 

Monthly Trade Report (12 issues) 



Number 

of 
Copies 



BlLINGD.\L 

Census of Industry, 1918 (Part II) DairylFactories — Recensement 
industriel, 1918 (He PartieV Industrie laitiere 

Census of Industry, 1918, Fisheries Statistics — Recensement 
industriel, 1918, Statistique des pecheries 

Sixth Census of Canada, 1921, Instructions to Commissioners and 
Enumerators — Sixieme recensement du Canada, 1921, Instruc- 
tions aux commissaires et cnumeratcurs 

International Convention for the Protection of Industrial Property 
— Convention Internationale pour la protection de la propri6t6. 

French 

Annuaire Statistique, 1918 

Reglements et forniules du Bureau des Brevets du Canada 

"Acte des brevets" — Statuts refondus du Canada 

Circulaire du bureau des brevets et des droits d'auteurs, etc., avec 

index 

Loi modifiant et codifiant la legislature concernant le droit d'auteur 

La Gazette agricole du Canada, 1920-21 (13 issues) 

Bulletin mensuel de la statistique agricole, 1920-21 (13 issues). . . 



Totals 

Totals (March 31, 1920). 



4,989,200 



1,000 

1,000 
2,000 

5,000 
1,000 
1,500 
5,000 
50 
830 
8,500 
S,275 
8.650 
1,100 

400 
500 

3,000 
1,250 
2,025 
500 
6,700 
1,019 
50 

500 

500 

,39.070 

75,200 

50 

1,500 

150 

2,300 

6.600 

416,992 

53,012 

13,007 



3,000 
1,500 

13,000 
50 



2,025 
1,000 
1,000 

500 

75 

10,000 

17,898 



Number 

of 

Pages 



5,707,478 
6,304,517 



39,950 

106 
64 



74 

12 

8 

24 

8 

152 
16 
18 
18 

120 

16 

44 



16 

20 

8 

714 

186 

48 



438 

74 

8 

68 

32 

474 

2,992 

3,776 

5,692 



130 

188 

112 
24 



716 
36 
24 

28 

72 

1,108 

424 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



,59, 128 
65,109 



153,648,924 



106,000 

64,000 
176,000 

370, 000 

12,000 

12,000 

120,000 

400 

126,160 

136,000 

148,950 

155,700 

132,000 

6,400 
22,000 

24, 000 

20,000 

40,500 

4,000 

4,783,800 

189,534 

2,400 

4,000 

4,000 

3,175,400 

2,708,300 

3,700 

12, 000 

10,200 

73,600 

316,200 

24,817,984 

3,776.864 

6,157,060 



390, 000 
282,000 

1,456,000 
1,200 



1,449,900 
36. 000 
24,000 

14,000 

5,400 

858.400 

626,860 



206,503,836 
236,526,132 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR AND SUPERINTENDENT OF PRINTING 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 33 



23 



Table No. 9. — Statement of other Letterpress Departmental Work fur the 

Fiscal Year 1920-21. 



Department 


Envelopes 


Copies 
other 
work 




5,600 

598, 000 

108,500 

24,000 

130,000 


33 278 


Agriculture 


4,199,564 

1,697,296 

,391,307 


Air Board 




239,450 


Canadian National Railways .... 


5 006 




. 


30, 000 


Chief Electoral Officer 


48.5,593 

86,000 

10,000 

1,500 

108,000 

8,500 

337,000 

63,200 

501,350 

11,000 

42,500 

154,925 

107,750 

127,500 

131,750 


8, 878, 634 


Civil Sen,'ice Commission. 


2,129,484 
283,925 


Council Sub-Committee on Economy and Efficiency 


14,470 




19,957,964 




42,500 


Experimental Farms 


1 082 130 


External Affairs 


292,644 




16,577,218 


Governor General's Secretary . . 


166 607 


Health 


632,104 




238,847 


Immigration and Coloniz^ion 


3 405 925 




486,565 


Inland Revenue 


7 354 518 




326,995 




499,983 

74,100 

112,000 


6,004,736 




478 839 




1,142,910 




52,542 


Marine 


247,725 


1 966 716 




6,806,219 


Mines 


129,000 
129,000 


302 072 




2 686, 175 




5,000 


Overseas Militarv Forces of Canada 


6,000 

2,000 
722,050 

3,000 

233,465 

310,970 

44,000 

141,750 

7,000 


4 030 


Pension Commissioners 


523,865 


Post Office 


67,822,663 


Privy Council 


13 160 




3,900,337 


Public Works 


4,094,481 




117,372 


Railways and Cana.ls ... 


663 650 


Railway Commission 


135,700 


Royal Mint 


3,700 




67,000 

391,400 

15,100 

23,000 


1,106,045 


Secretary of State 


696,509 




38,422 




4,938.800 




1,233,330 


Trade and Commerce 


409,387 


6,914,000 






Totals 


6, 610, .598 
22,758,839 


180,117,704 


Totals (March 31, 1920) 


192,802,467 







Table No. 10. — Statement showing the Number of Halftone Plates or other 
Insertions in Annual and Supplementary Reports. (None inserted in 
1920-21.) 



24 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRIX TING AND STATIONERY 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 
Table No. U. — Statement of Books Bound during the Fiscal Year 1920-21. 



Department 


Full 
Leather 


Halt 
Leather 


Quarter 
Leather 


Cloth 










85 


Agriculture 




395 

206 

51 


316 

41 
18 


2 979 






14,748 


Auditor General 




1 


Canadian National Railways 




500 


Chief Electoral Officer 








4 


Civil Service Commission 






19 

1.39 

1,274 

54 

76 

20,385 

1,007 

71 

125 

177 

276 

1,422 

27 

992 

209 

28 

1,017 

126 

332 

312 

337 

2 

17 

1,532 

6 

794 

213 

16 

94 

8 

151 


6 

S65 

50 

27 

3 

382 

17 


39 






3,004 


Customs 




7 128 




16 


231 




20. 160 


Finance 


1 
1 


87 




3 


Health 


61 




4 


9,939 




3,428 


Indian Affairs ; 


2 


302 
108 


898 




11,229 


Insurance 


1,500 

507 

36 


40 




680 
11 


6,923 




151 


Labour 


4,157 








51 


Marine 




16 

17 

11 

101 


2,543 




58 

68 

3 


3,184 


Mines 


1.396 


Naval Service 


4,767 




9 


Pension Commissioners 






504 


Post Office 




2,319 


43,116 


Privy Council 


4 






2,780 
2 


22,520 


Public Works 


500 


2,079 


Purchasing Conimission 


41 




1 


10 

5 

44 

12 

8 


500 


Railway Commission 


50 






294 


Royal Mint . . . . . . . 






Secretary of State 


12 

4 


112 

27 

6 

20 

210 


125 


Senate . 


772 




2 

167 

26 


8.242 






5,630 


Trade and Commerce 


42 


10,887 






Totals 


2,759 
565 


32,265 
15,069 


8,346 
13,395 


192,505 


Totals (March 31, 1920) 


248,520 







REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR AND SUPERINTENDENT OF PRINTING 25 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 33 
Table No. 12. — Number of Pads made during the Fiscal Year 1920-21. 



Department 



Quantity 



Advisory Research Council 

Agriculture 

Air Board 

Auditor General 

Canadian Northern Railways 

Canadian Patriotic Fund 

Civil Ser\nce Commission 

Chief Electoral Officer 

Council Sub-Committee on Economy and Efficiency. 

Customs 

Experimental Farms 

External Affairs 

Finance 

Health 

House of Commons 

Immigration and Colonization 

Indian Affairs 

Inland Revenue 

Insurance : . 

Interior 

Justice 

Labour 

Library of Parliament 

Marine , 

Militia and Defence 

Mines 



Naval Ser\nce 

Overseas Military Forces of Canada. 

Post Office 

Privy Council 

Public Printing and Stationery 

Public Works 

Purchasing Commission 

Railways and Canals 

Railway Comm.ission 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police 

Secretary of State 

Senate 

Soldiers' Civil Re- establishment 

Soldier Settlement Board 

Trade and Commerce 



100 

3,223 

879 

266 

110 

151 

5.172 

149 

45 

2,202 

440 

430 

4,544 

987 

6,403 

23,301 

1,596 

5,044 

308 

13,851 

507 

3,139 

501 

3,562 

22, 199 

435 

8,806 

5 

151,476 

26 

192,166 

26,823 

70 

3,681 

100 

2,027 

1,056 

223 

27,903 

171 

26,351 



Total 

Total (March 31, 1920). 



540,428 
644,581 



Table No. 13. — Statement of Prepaid Post Office Envelopes made and stamped 
during the Fiscal Year 1920-21. 



Quantity 
made and 
stamped 



One-cent envelopes 

Two-cent envelopes 

Three-cent envelopes 

Total 

Total (March 31, 1920) 



1,600,000 

2.650,000 

200, 000 



4,450,000 
3,425,000 



26 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTIXG AXD STATIONERY 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 



Table No. 14. — Statement of the Die Stamping of Letter and Note Headings 
and Envelopes during the Fiscal Year 1920-21. 



Department 


Foolscap, 

Half Cap, 

Letter 

and 

Half Letter 


Note 

and 

HaU Note 


Envelopes 


Number 

of 

Impressions 




27.000 
2,500 


1,200 
7,500 
3,000 
3,000 


15,000 
5,500 
2,000 

21,000 


43 200 


Air Board 


15,500 
5,000 

30, 000 
4 000 


Chief Electoral OfiBcer 


Civil Ser\'ice Commission 


6,000 
4,000 


Commission of Conservation 




8,500 


11,590 
20,700 
12.640 
42,925 


20. 090 


External Affairs . . 


35,000 
15,000 
26,500 

6,000 
21,100 
25,000 

5,000 


55,700 
27,640 
98,575 








29,150 


Health 


6 000 




21,900 


502,125 


545, 125 




25,000 


Indian Affairs 






5 000 




50,000 




50, 000 


Inteiior 


64,500 
11,500 

6,000 
25.000 
12,000 
35,000 

1,500 


20. 000 

6,750 

10,000 

25, 000 


84 500 






18,250 


Marine 




16 000 


Militia and Defence 


167,000 


217,000 




12,000 


Naval Scr\'ice 




6,000 


41,000 


Overseas Military' Forces of Canada 




1,500 






10,000 
18,000 
11,000 
2,000 
13,000 


10,000 


Post Office 


3,000 
8,750 


700 
2,200 


21,700 




21,950 


Public Printing and Stationery 


2,000 


Public Works 


23,500 
4,000 

37,000 
2,000 
6,000 

45,505 

38,000 
4,000 

44,500 


. 1,000 


57,500 




4,000 




12,000 

100 

15,000 

3,000 

10,525 


14,000 
7,000 

15,000 
6,300 

25, 500 
6,000 
1,000 


63,000 




9,100 




36, 000 




54,805 


Senate 


74,025 


Soldieis* Civil Re-establishment 


10,000 






45,500 


, 








544,855 
836,565 


335,775 
214,845 


830,030 
907, 100 


1,730,660 


Totals (March 31, 1920) 


1,958,510 







REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR AND SUPERINTENDENT OF PRINTING 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 33 



27 



Table No. 15. — Statement of tlio Loose-Leaf Work performed during the Fiscal 

Year 1920-2L 



Department 


Binders 


Loose 
Leaves 


Index 
Leaves 


Index 
Cards 




2 

101 

240 

7 

1 

673 

38 

9 

2 

196 

1 

65 

7 

547 

2 

5 


• 








189,886 

119,551 

61,600 

2,300 

53,118 

61,600 

17,068 

8,700 

132,090 

2,000 

7,700 

30, 653 

300,136 


2,578 

2,670 

116 

100 

4,107 

141 




Air Board 


7,220 








50, 000 


Canadian National Railways 






60, 000 


Commission of Conservation 




Council Sub-Committee on Economy and Efficiency.. 






1,167 
43 




Editorial Committee ... 










1,424 

35,556 

72 

170 




Finance 








Health 


3,860 

5,000 

13,700 

9,805 

34,983 

500 

201,358 

13,400 

718,250 

500 

156,150 

184,477 

25,010 

102,302 

1,000 

67,270 

275,300 

1,000 

421,282 

58,325 

33,500 

165,434 

8,000 

157,500 

20,250 

263,703 

572,906 

262, 170 




House of Coniinons 




Immigration and Colonization 


12 

21 

215 


55 

542 

3,326 






Indian Affairs 

Inland Revenue 


500 


Insurance 






505 
9 
1 


7,499 

1,230 

15 


40,500 


Justice 


4,000 




107,350 


Library of Parliament 






124 

330 

11 

103 

5 

50 

511 

2 

108 

65 

2 

128 

9 

95 

16 

903 

453 

177 


1,531 

6,062 

258 

317 

29 

201 

8,559 

29 

1,792 

1,982 


1,000 






Mines 


5,000 






North West Territories 




Pension Commissioners 




Post Office 


1,000 


Privy Council . . . 




Public Printing and Stationeiy 


1,211,860 


Public Works 


2,000 


Purchasing Commi.ssion 


10,000 


Railways and Canals 


679 

58 

119 

173 

10,709 

6,179 

170,465 


1,000 






Royal Canadian Mounted Police 


8,000 


Secretary of State 




Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment 


10,000 


Soldier Settlement Board.. . 




Trade and Commerce 


159.920 






Totals 


5,744 
8,224 


4,763,337 
5,751,148 


269,953 
157,905 


1,679,350 


Totals (March 31, 1920) 


5,957,400 







Table No. 16. — Comparative Statement of the Numljer of Letterpress 
Impressions for the last Eight Fiscal Years. 



Years 


Impressions 


1913-14 


87,473,093 


1914-15 


93.925,493 


1915-16 


102.934,861 


1916-17 


103,367,779 


1917-18 . . 


112,502,835 


1918-19 


100,522,456 


1919-20 . 


111,937,537 


1920-21 


94,563,860 




. 





12 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 33 A. 1922 



OUTSIDE PRINTING BRANCH. 

The following is a report of the work executed for Parliament and the 
various departments in outside printing establishments during the fiscal year 
ending March 31, 1921. Numbers 8 to 15 below correspond to the serial num- 
bers o' the tables in the report of the Director and Superintendent of Printing. 
Numbers 17 and 18 apply to work or processes not carried on in the Bureau. 

» 8. Pamphlet and miscellaneous book-work. 

9. Other letterpress departmental work. 

11. Books bound. 

12. Pads made. 

14. Die stamping. 

15. Loose-leaf work. 

17. Lithographed maps, plans, cheques and forms. 

18. Halftones, line cuts, electros and dies made. 



29 
33—3 



30 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRLXTING AND STATIONERY 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

Table No. 8. — Return of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, Year 1920-21 

(copies and pages aggregate). 



Description 



Agriculture — 



English 



The Entomological Record for 1920 

Charles Gordon Hewitt, by Arthur Gibson and J. M. Swaine, and 
The Writings of the Late C. Gordon Hewitt, by C. B. Hutchings 

Experimental Farms — 

English 

The "Alkali" Content of Soils as related to Crop Growth 

Immigration and Colonization — 

English 



Canada Descriptive Atlas, 1919. 

Canada West ". 

Eastern Canada 



hahour— 



English 



Joint Council in Industry 

Canadian Railway Board of Adjustment No. 1 — Report of Pro- 
ceedings of Board from August 7, 1918, to August 31, 1920 

The Mining Laws of the Various Provinces 

The Employment Service of Canada (No. .32). , 

Action of Various Countries upon Conventions and Recommenda- 
tions of the First International Labour Conference 

Information respecting the Russian Soviet System and its Propa- 
ganda in North America 

Canada and the International Labour Office — Report to the Min- 
ister of Labour for Canada 

Report of Board of Conciliation and Investigation under Industrial 
Disputes Investigation Act, 1907, &c. (2 issues) 

Report of the Dominion-Provincial Commission — Uniformity of 
Labour Laws, April 26 to 'May 1 , 1920 

Workmen's Compensation Legislation in Canada (2 issues) 

Labour Legislation in Canada, 1919 

Report of Royal Commission appointed by Dominion Government 
1920 — Coal Mining Operations in Nova Scotia and New Bruns- 
wick (2 issues) 

Information respecting the Russian Soviet System and its Propa- 
ganda in North America, 1920 

The Labour Gazette. Nos. 3 to 12, Vol. XX, and Nos. 1 and 2 
Vol. XXI 



French 

Les conseils conjoints dans I'industrie 

Rapport de la Commission Federale-Provinciale — Uniformity des 

lois ouvrieres, 26 avril au ler mai, 1920 

Renseignement sur le systeme Soviet Russe et sa propagande dans 

I'Amerique du Nord 

Canadian Railway Board of Adjustment No. 1 — Rapport des pro- 

c6dures du Board du 7 aout 1918 au 31 aoflt 1920 

La Gazette du Travail, n°" 3 4 12, Vol. XX, et n-' 1 et 2, Vol 

XXI 



Marine and Fisheries — 

Phenologioal Observations . 
Carried forward . . . 



English 



Number 

of 
Copies 



750 
750 

50 



355.990 

100,000 

55,800 



10,000 

300 
300 
800 

250 

50,000 

1,000 

300 

2,550 

600 

2,000 

200 
50,000 
178,650 

1,500 

250 

10,000 

50 

31,615 



200 



853,905 



Number 

of 

Pages 



20 
12 



10 



80 
32 
32 



24 

28 
12 

28 

8 

18 

24 

52 

12 

10 

184 

20 

20 

1,930 



28 
12 
20 
32 
1,932 

20 



4,600 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



15,000 
9,000 

500 



28,479,200, 
3,200,000 
1,785.600 



240, 000 

8,400 

3,600 

22,400 

2,000 

900,000 

24,000 

15,600 

30, 600 

6,000 

368,000 

4,000 

1,000,000 

26,289,900 

42, 000 

3,000 

200,000 

1,600 

5,070,730 



4,000 



67,725,130 



REPOHr OF THE OUTSIDE I'RJXTJXa SERVICE BRANCH 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 33 



31 



Table No. 8. — Return of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, Year 1920-21 
(copies and pages aggregate) — Concluded. 



Description 


Number 

of 
Copies 


Number 

of 

Pages 


Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 




853,905 

800 

2,998 
2,998 


4,600 

32 

264 
116 


67,725,130 


Militia and Defence — 

English 

Report on the Examination for Admission to the Royal Military 


25,600 


Railways and Canals — 

English 

Final Report of Board of Engineers, Quebec Bridge, Vol. I 

Final Report of Board of Engineers, Quebec Bridge, Vol. II 


791,472 
347,768 


Totals 


860,701 
755,900 


5,012 
4,986 


68,889.970 


Totals (March 31, 1920) 


37,764,800 







Table No. 9. — Statement of other Letterpress Departmental Work for the 

Fiscal Year 1920-21. 



Department 


Envelopes 


Copies 

other 
work 


Agriculture 


2,500 


2.780,468 


Air Board 


3,100 






50,000 


Chief Electoral Officer 




50,000 






25,140 






10,000 


Customs 




76, 650 




2.666 


15,040 


External Affairs 


500 


Finance . . . . 




4,241,100 






60 


House of Commons . 




4,000 




10,000 


128,300 




11,075 






34,000 






61,000 


Interior . . 


25,500 


44,000 


Justice 


3,500 






181,900 


Marine .... 


3,600 


69,539 




69,740 






300 


Naval Service 


10,000 






179,164 


Post Office 




13,572,589 


Privy Council 




750 






11,500 


Public Works 




10,200 


Purchasing Commission 


2,000 


5,000 




86,500 


Roj'al Canadian Mounted Police . 




65,500 






189,400 


Soldier Settlement Board 




69,400 




8,000 


701,750 






Totals 


63,600 
73,200 


22,751,165 


Totals (March 31, 1920) 


64,813,275 







32 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRIXTIXG AND STATIONERY 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 
Table No. 11. — Statement of Books Bound during the Fiscal Year 1920-21. 



Department 


Full 
Leather 


Half 
Leather 


Quarter 
Leather 


Cloth 


Auditor General 








150 






19 
38 
23 


1 

7 




Health 












Marine 


3 






Post Office 




250 


4.014 








5,996 










640 












Total 


3 
2 


SO 
152 


258 
183 


10,800 


Total (March 31, 1920) 


71,989 







Table No. 12. — Number of Pads made during the Fi.scal Year 1920-21. 



Department 



Quantity 



Agriculture 

Finance 

Justice 

Militia and Defence 

Overseas Militarj' Forces of Canada 

Post Office 

Railways and Canals 

Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment 

Soldier Settlement Board 

Trade and Commerce 

Total 

Total (March 31, 1920). 



31,000 

500 

75 

45 

5 

102,266 

25 

20 

32 

6 



133,974 
230,451 



Table No. 14. — Statement of the Die Stamping of Letter and Note Headings 
and Envelopes during the Fiscal Year 1920-21. 



Department 


Foolscap, 

Half Cap, 

Letter 

and 

Half Letter 


Note 

and 

Half Note 


Envelopes 


Number 

of 

Impressions 


External Affairs 




320 

3,800 

100 




320 


Governor General*s Secretary.. . . . . 






3,800 








100 










Total 




4,220 
2,575 




4,220 


Total (March 31, 1920) 


2,000 


150 


4,725 







REPORT OF THE OUTSIDE PRINTING SERVICE BRANCH 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 33 



33 



Table No. 15. — Statemont of the Loose-Leaf Work pprforniprl (hiring the Fiscal 

Year 1920-21. 



Department 


Binders 


Loose 
Leaves 


Index 
Leaves 


Index 
Cards 




24 


5,250 










1,050,500 


Pension Com niissi oners 








51,680 


Public Works . . . 








5,100 




62 


591 




12,000 








Total 


86 

51 


5,841 

67,055 




1,119,280 


Total (March 31, 1920) 


890 


942,350 



Table No. 17. — Statement giving the Number of Maps, Plans, Cheques, and 
Forms Lithographed during the Fiscal Year 1920-21. 



Department 


Maps 

and 

Plans 


Cheques 
and 

Forms 


Agriculture 




3,705,000 






35, 000 


Auditor General . .... 




60,000 


Civil Service Commission 




2,000 




10,500 


25,200 


Customs . . 


216,725 






61,931 






1,369,475 


Health . 




3,245,800 




6,755 


528,500 


Immigration and Colonization ... 


15,084 






30,500 






7,000 


Interior '. 


203,793 


39,000 




20,600 






1,000 


Marine 


269,850 


99,300 




1,098,245 




126,512 
17,340 


18,800 


Naval Service 


58,048 




3,000 


Pension Commissioners 




276,000 


Post Office 


167,935 


245,975 


Privv Council 


500 


Public Printing and Stationery 




49,500 


Public Works 




115,000 


Purchasing Commission 




500 






86,500 


Royal Canadian Mounted Police. . . ... . 




275,000 


Secretary of State 




25,326 






3,225 






1,310,500 


Soldier ."Settlement Board 




79,000 


Trade and Commerce. . . . 


20,969 


486.910 






Totals 


823,6.54 
454,433 


13,594,144 


Totals (March 31, 1920) 


25,750,477 







34 DEPARTME.XT OF PUBLIC PRIXTIXG AXD STATIONERY 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

Table Xo. 18,— Statement of the Number of Halftones, Line Cuts, Electros 
and Dies made during the Fiscal Year 1920-21. 



Department 


Halftones 


Line Cuts 


Electros 


Dies 


Agriculture 


107 
1 


71 

1 


119 

27 

8 

124 

12 

4 

77 




Air Board 




Board of Commerce 




Chief Electoral Officer 








Civil Ser\'ice Commission 




9 

7 




Commission of Conservation 


10 




Customs 




Director of Public Information 




3 




Editorial Committee 




2 
169 

7 
242 

7 




Experimental Farms. '. 


56 


846 




External Affairs 


1 


Finance 




1 

5 

39 

6 




Health 






House of C ommons 






Immigration and Colonization 


23 


384 

5 

36 

9 

168 
6 
2 
2 

30 
54 
12 
26 
7 
502 
74 
15 




Indian Affairs ' 




Inland Revenue 




5 

7 

181 




Insurance 


20 
142 








Justice ■ 






3 


3 








Marine 




2 

28 
129 
280 






29 

84 
23 




Mines 








Pension Commissioners. ..... 




Post Office 




18 

178 
1 
2 

286 


2 


Public Printing and Stationery 


16 




Public Works 










Railways and Canals 


131 

2 


23 
8 
4 
16 
20 
74 






1 




1 

13 

1 

9.898 




Soldiers' Civil Re- establishment 


38 




Soldier Settlement Board 




Trade and Commerce 


96 








Totals 


781 
913 


12,021 
8,995 


2,275 
2,233 


4 


Totals (March 31, 1910) 


8 







12 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 33 A. 1922 



ACCOUNTANT'S BRANCH. 

Ottawa, June, 1921. 

Frederick A. Acland, Esq., 

King's Printer and Controller of Stationery. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the following report of the transaction 
of this branch of the department for the fiscal year ending March .31, 1921 
Complete details of the financial operations of the department will be found 
under the following heads: — 

1. General Financial Statement. 

2. Letter of Credit Account. 

3. King's Printer's Advance Account. 

4. Printing Branch Account and comparative statements. 

5. Stationery Branch Account and comparative statements. 

6. Appropriations, detail of expenditure. 

7. Canada Gazette, comparative statement of Revenue and Expenditure. 

8. Casual Revenue Account. 

9. Canadian National Railways Printing Accounts. 
10. Government Newspaper Advertising Accounts. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. A. FRIGON, 

Chief Accountant . 



36 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRIXTIXG AXD STATIONERY 



12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 






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38 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 



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39 



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40 DEPARTMEXT OF PUBLIC PRIXTIXG AND STATIOXERY 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 
2. LETTER OF CREDIT ACCOUNT. 

Total amount received by letters of credit for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1921 $ 4, 216, 788 90 

Total amount received by bills of exchange 59, 874 64 

Total amount received by cheques on New York 186, 161 48 



$ 4,462,825 02 



Detail, by accounts of net expenditure d^a^^^l on above amounts — 

Printing Branch account $ 2,5.31,217 23 

Stationery Branch account 1,443,657 78 

Printing, binding and distributing the annual statutes 16, 000 00 

Plant— Renewals 32,980 65 

Canada Gazette , 43, 521 06 

Miscellaneous printing 76,709 02 

Distribution of parliamentary documents 46,440 53 

Gratuities '. 2,011 44 

Provisional bonus allowance 94,907 47 

Vote No. 31, Public Printing and Stationery — Reorganization 162,475 26 

Unforeseen expenses — Royal Commission of Enquiry 1,425 30 

% 4,451,375 74 
Refunds, deposited to respective accounts — 

Printing Branch account $ 7,810 83 

Stationer}' Branch account 856 13 

■ Plant — Renewals 5 15 

Provisional Bonus allowance 1,618 85 

Vote No. 31 — Public Printing and Stationen- — Reorganization 1,158 32 

11,449 28 



$ 4,462,825 02 



3. KING'S PRINTER'S ADVANCE ACCOUNT. 

Balance brought forward — Excess of expenditure over revenue on Printing Branch account 

from fiscal year 1919-20 $ 6, 654 92 

Advances to King's Printer during fiscal year 1920-21 — 

For Printing Branch account $ 2,539,028 06 

For Stationery Branch account 1 , 444, 513 91 

3,983,541 97 

$ 3,990,196 89 

Deposits to credit of Receiver General made by the King's Printer to cover 
advances during the fiscal year 1920-21 — 

Amount received from departments and Parliament for printing, etc S 2,297,697 04 

Amount from sale of dross 1 , 590 75 

Amount from sale of empty spools 34 40 

Amount from sale of leather scrappings 30 50 

Amount from sale of electros 5 50 

Amount from sale of mats and plates 401 80 

$ 2,299,7.59 99 

Amount of refunds — Printing Branch 7,810 83 

$ 2,307,570 82 
Excess of expenditure over revenue on Printing Branch account carried to fiscal jear 1921-22 238, 112 16 

$ 2,545,682 98 

Amount received from departments and Parliament for stationerj-, etc t 1.362,018 01 

Amount from sale of paper stock inventory to Printing Branch 217, 137 98 

-Amount from sale of waste twine 11 90 

Amount from sale of waste blotting paper, etc 313 10 

1,579,480 99 
Amount of refunds — Stationery Branch 856 13 

$ 1,580,337 12 
Excess of expenditure over revenue on Stationery Branch account carried to 

fiscal vear 1921-22 64.465 41 

$ 1,644,802 53 

$ 4,190,485 51 
Amount by which the stock of Stationery Branch was decreased during the fiscal year, 

1920-21 200,288 62 

$ 3,990,196 89 



REPORT OF THE ACCOUNTANT 41 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 33 

4. PRINTING BRANCH ACCOUNT. 

Balance brought forward — Excess of expenditure over revenue, from fiscal year 1919-20. . . $ 6, 654 92 

Inventory on April 1, 1920 .313,28.5 07 

Expenditure tor the fiscal year 1920-21 — 

Inside work. Wages $ 957,299 39 

" Printing material, etc 1 , 277, 557 70 

Outside work 296, 360 14 

2,531,217 23 

Net credit balance for the fiscal year 1920-21 297,406 07 

t 3,148,563 29 

Revenue for the fiscal year 1920-21 — 

Sale of inside work, printing, etc. to departments and Parliament $ 1,986,612 51 

Sale of outside work to departments and Parliament. 311, 084 53 

— $ 2,297,797 04 

Sale of dross $ 1,590 75 

Sale of empty spools 34 40 

Sale of electros 5 50 

Sale of leather scrappings 30 50 

Sale of mats and plates 401 80 

. $ 2,062 95 

$ 2,299,759 99 

Excess of expenditure over revenue carried to fiscal vear 1921-22 238,112 16 

Inventory on March 31, 1921 610, 691 14 

S 3,148,563 29 



Detail of Inventory of Printinq Branch on March 31, 1921 

Work in process — Labour and burden — 

Hand composition $ 46, 330 60 

Linotype composition 25, 776 50 

Monotype composition 24, 560 87 

$ 106,667 97 

Stereotyping 1 , 442 08 

Press work 15, 159 92 

Binding 26,898 18 

Die stamping 223 00 

Map engraving .52,841 80 

$ 203,232 95 

Work in process — Material — 

Pressroom division. — Ink $ 3 65 

Bindery " 821 38 

Map engraving " 31 82 

Paper 99, 025 45 

99,882 30 

Materials, etc., on hand in different divisions — 

Paper stores division $ 215,354 10 

Printing stores " 74, 780 75 

Mechanical " 628 82 

Linotype " 6 08 

Monotype " 25 65 

Stereotype " 157 93 

Press " 3,019 05 

Bindery " 2,136 80 

Ruling " 141 13 

Die stamping " 225 57 

Map engraving " 1, 235 65 

. ■ — 297,711 53 

Amount for lithographing, printing, binding, etc., paid to outside firms and not charged to 

departments and Parliament on March 31 , 1921 9, 864 36 

$ 610,691 14 



42 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 



Statement, by Departments, of accounts paid for Printing, Binding, Litho- 
graphing, etc., done outside the Department, during the fiscal year ending 
March 31, 1921. 



Department 



Freight, 
etc. 



Printing, 
Binding, 
Lithograph- 
ing 



Total 



Agriculture. , 

Air Board 

Archives 

Auditor General 

Board of Commerce 

Canadian National Railways. . 

Chief Electoral Officer 

Civil Service Commission 

Commission of Conservation . . . 

Customs 

Editorial Committee 

Experimental Farms 

External Affairs 

Finance 

Governor General's Secretary. , 

Health 

House of Commons 

Immigration and Colonization. 

Indian .\ftairs 

Inland Revenue 

Insurance 

Interior 

Justie 



Labour 

Librarj- of Parliament 

Marine 

Militia and Defence 

Mines 

Ministry of Overseas Military Forces. 

Naval Service 

Patent and Copyright Office 

Pension Commission 

Post Office 

Privy Council 

Public Printing and Stationery 

Public Works 

Railways and Canals 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police 

Secretary of State 

Senate of Canada 

Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment 

Soldier Settlement Board 

Trade and Commerce 

War Purchasing Commission 



cts. 



214 56 



06 



20 63 
40 



2 67 
9^336 53 



20 41 
3,351 04 



1 15 

281 04 

3 24 

22 06 



25 82 
152 87 
65 74 



89 11 
14 30 



84 12 



9 98 

1 00 

230 88 



1 90 
55 



343 35 



S cts. 

9,165 91 

859 17 

1,061 05 

98 70 

5 35 



748 55 

336 75 

1.170 66 

863 21 

3 01 

1,734 02 

1,133 65 

22,113 54 

457 49 

1.267 22 

1,400 63 

16,171 23 

370 14 

361 50 

294 82 

22,436 80 

154 97 

34,778 80 

54 56 

21,373 77 

8,479 86 

10,140 73 

27 00 

12,161 51 

8,961 75 

3.342 50 

59,280 69 

39 25 

1,159 00 

572 71 

14,621 30 

465 67 

3,995 75 

32 50 

3,964 50 

1,292 12 

15,086 14 

48 25 



$ cts. 

9,380 47 

859 17 

1,061 05 

98 76 

5 35 

20 63 

748 95 

336 75 

1,170 66 

863 21 

3 01 

1,736 69 

1,133 65 

31,450 07 

457 49 

1 , 267 22 

1,421 04 

19,522 27 

370 14 

361 50 

295 97 

22,717 84 

158 21 

34,800 86 

54 56 

21,399 59 

8,632 73 

10,206 47 

27 00. 

12,250 62 

8,976 05 

3,342 50 

59,364 81 

39 25 

1,168 98 

573 71 

14,852 18 

465 67 

3,995 75 

34 40 

3,965 05 

1.292 12 

15,429 49 

48 25 



14,273 41 



282,086 73 



296,360 14 



REPORT OF THE ACCOUNTANT 



43 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 33 

Statement of Printinfi;, Lithographiiifj;, etc., and Paper .supi)li('(l to Depart- 
ments and Parliament for the Fiscal Year ending March 31, 1921. 



Department 



Outside 
Work 



Outside 

Printing, 

Binding, 

etc. 



Paper 



Total 



Advisory Research Council 

Agriculture 

Air lioard , 

Archives . 

Auditor General 

Board of Commerce 

Canadian National Railways 

Canadian Patriotic Fund 

Civil Service Commission 

Chief Electoral Officer 

Commission of Conservation 

Customs 

Council on Economy and Efficiency. . . 

Departments Generally 

Editorial Committee 

Exchequer Court 

External Affairs 

Finance 

Governor General's Secretary 

Health 

House of Commons 

Immigration and Colonization 

Indian Affairs 

Inland Revenue 

Insurance 

Interior 

Justice 

Labour 

Library of Parliament 

Marine 

Militia and Defence 

Mines 

Ministry of Overseas Military Forces. 

Miscellaneous Printing 

National Gallery of Canada 

Naval Service 

North West Territories 

Patent and Copyright Office 

Penitentiaries 

Pension Commission 

Post Office.. ^ 

Priv>' Council 

Public information 

Public Printing and Stationery 

Public Works 

Raihvays and Canals 

Railway Commission 

Royal Mint 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police 

Secretary of State 

Senate of Canada 

Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment 

Soldier Set tlement Board 

Supreme Court 

Trade and Commerce 

War Purchasing Commission 



8 cts. 



619 94 
878 22 
061 05 

98 76 
5 .35 

21 23 



336 75 

7-48 95 

,618 61 

900 04 



94 30 
3 01 



333 65 
971 15 
457 49 
122 15 
189 36 
485 27 
324 14 
344 S3 
292 67 
787 47 

65 17 
483 99 

54 56 
820 31 
687 04 
046 35 

84 00 
450 96 



12,898 92 
11, 



62 



20 



278 04 

91 29 

650 SO 

3.35 71 

39 25 

18 60 

958 94 

669 94 

423 52 

104,87 



810 80 
,905 75 



14 



980 62 
338 20 

31 00 
113 26 

48 25 



$ cts. 

1.090 16 

48,200 95 

13,949 99 

1,7C2 42 

l,.5fiO 41 

1,517 34 

4,547 33 

104 83 

9.165 86 

20.986 93 

5,751 49 

31,9.33 03 

138 73 

247 23 

463 91 

1,0.54 97 

11,357 69 

32,366 17 

1,944 64 

4,439 93 

168. 180 53 

13,134 02 

4.021 87 

18,879 36 

17,723 84 

65,510 49 

2.168 .35 

13., 520 93 

9,492 .53 

19,790 64 

44,787 39 

34.238 75 

46 62 

58,475 74 

82 55 

43,283 32 

843 55 

23,980 13 

1,519 53 

4,732 76 

101,743 92 

332 14 

60 00 

74,602 60 

14,532 14 

7,203 ,35 

2,896 22 

71 05 

5,779 59 

6,029 43 

13,537 17 

15,619 51 

12,633 37 

5,686 40 

80,366 25 

1,264 32 



311,084 53 



1,079,294 37 



cts. 



.332 47 
43,170 20 



8,914 


71 


447 


94 


2,757 57 


2,260 44 


1,537 


14 


112 66 


8,0.55 49 


43,915 88 


3,240 06 


65,651 


27 


236 


01 


115 


70 


249 00 


124 


10 


4,063 60 


119,019 


29 


1.310 03 


3,1.55 


14 


28,925 


75 


29, 457 


66 


2,482 


47 


26,507 


04 


5,952 33 


39,5.52 86 


713 82 


29.986 


77 


990 


18 


12.SC7 


15 


28,587 


46 


8,606 


70 


40 98 


13,796 43 


32 


73 


13,392 


01 


323 


55 


5,607 


26 


894 


20 


11,8.55 


70 


121,619 82 


134 


10 


75,889 65 


10,295 
11.017 


16 



1,276 01 

23 42 

7,598 32 

6,885 29 

685,06 

17,032 42 

12,637 58 

2,770 79 

70,325 73 

644 76 



907,318 14 



i cts. 

1,422 63 

104,991 09 

23,742 92 

3. 211 41 

4,416 74 

3,783 13 

6,105 70 

217 49 

17,5.58 10 

65,651 76 

10,610 16 

98,484 34 

374 74 

457 23 

715 92 

1,179 07 

16,754 94 

188,356 61 

3.712 16 

8,717 22 

198,295 64 

62,076 95 

6,828 48 

45,731 23 

23,968 84 

125,850 82 

2,947 34 

75,991 69 

9,839 27 

53,418 10 

82,061 89 

53,891 80 

171 60 

72,723 13 

115 28 

69,574 25 

1,166 10 

40,865 43 

2,505 02 

19,239 26 

285,699 45 

505 49 

78 60 

151,451 19 

25,497 24 

38,644 15 

4,277 10 

94 47 

14,188 71 

16,820 47 

14,222 23 

36,632 55 

26,609 15 

8,488 19 

164,805 24 

1,957 33 



2,297,697 04 



44 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



12 GEORGE V, A. 192 2 

Comparative Statement of Printing, Binding, Lithographing, etc., and Paper 
supplied to Departments and Parliament for the last five fiscal years, 
1916-17, 1917-18, 1918-19, 1919-20, and 1920-21. 



Department. 


1916-17 


1917-18 


1918-19 


1919-20 


1920-21 




S cts. 


$ cts. 

286 30 

223,096 06 


$ cts. 

1,335 10 

136,016 92 


S cts. 

1,924 86 

127,542 83 

3,214 11 

12,612 55 

3,612 80 


S cts. 
1,422 63 




293,306 23 


104,991 09 




23,742 92 




13,566 87 
1,914 59 


8,832 84 
4,451 78 


6,570 91 

1.333 32 

47 94 


3,211 41 




4,416 74 












2,878 85 


3.783 13 






39,571 59 

69 83 

14,211 42 


27.060 57 

56,237 53 

14,942 25 

22 99 














9,600 87 
10 20 


4,713 31 


6,105 70 


Canadian Munitions Resources Commission 






1,662 03 
45 89 


217 49 












Phipf Flpctnnl Officer 








65.651 76 




2,728 05 

9,7!1 30 

86 99 

112 15 


2,800 46 

34,0S1 19 

76 54 


12,156 45 

493 91 

1,843 12 


22,124 22 
3,026 63 
25,598 41 


17,658 10 








10,610 16 


Commission of Inquiry, Railways and Trans- 












374 74 




55,703 27 

231 47 

2,080 71 


60,910 91 

194 61 

2,807 52 

94 71 


45.433 33 

227 53 

4,172 36 

104 03 


01,893 26 

46 28 

2,798 36 


98,484 34 




457 23 








715 92 




87 04 

1,187 20 

8,766 30 

42,206 82 






340 68 

1,930 54 

86.328 58 

2.654 26 

3 12 

1,717 79 


220 44 

6,271 55 

201,439 44 

4,076 66 


428 29 
22.083 98 
160,760 95 


1,179 07 




16,754 94 




188,356 61 








3 99 
1,621 26 








1,773 60 


2,220 99 

7,082 40 

296,616 56 

240 31 

66,635 55 


3,712 16 


Health 


8,717 22 




251,016 61 


338,991 69 


158,543 53 


198,295 64 








21,019 30 


23,273 55 


26,238 36 
52 23 

5,898 50 
26,141 97 
26,916 47 
91,856 91 
114 34 
193 66 
74.723 97 
46.380 28 

6,360 46 
26,837 95 


62,076 95 








5,153 71 

34,307 08 

15,509 48 

124,897 45 

1.197 67 

417 15 

2,844 36 

26,517 01 

6,627 74 

41,409 35 

5,323 35 

606,830 13 

112,978 27 


5.688 20 

33.172 S3 

25.312 02- 

122.633 63 

27 95 

342 02 

85.814 09 

34,383 79 

7,777 09 

40,956 93 

13,011 22 

405,809 36 

121,428 99 


8,612 79 

19,530 24 

25,106 46 

146,161 11 

2,437 27 
239 62 

6,901 34 
74,924 00 

6,941 00 
42,643 83 


6,828 48 




45.731 23 




33,968 84 




125.850 82 










Justice 


3,947 34 
75.991 69 




9.839 37 


Marine _ 


53.418 10 




303,418 92 
36,427 31 


147,662 19 
54,671 00 

301 97 
98,991 54 

100 03 


82.061 89 




53,891 80 




171 60 


Miscellaneous Printing 

National Gallery of Canada — 


i52,427 i2 

15 60 

17,047 05 


131,006 65 

7 79 

28,091 SO 


97,840 60 
37 95 


72,723 13 
115 28 






6,053 78 

66.513 86 
73 87 

25,579 07 

2,732 96 

19,341 43 

243.009 57 

1,673 39 

39.271 33 

143,323 50 

28,584 43 

11.514 11 
4,340 42 
1,920 03 






89,051 18 


143,466 98 


111,387 15 
148 48 


69,574 25 




1.166 10 








40.865 43 




1,632 27 

6,090 21 

175,823 76 

2,589 46 


1,546 40 

21,812 01 

245,528 13 

4,759 89 


1,117 23 
15,082 70 
206.559 36 
4,177 95 
2S.321 09 
94,197 05 
28,321 96 
5,126 60 
4.343 53 
1,994 88 


2,. 505 02 




19,239 26 




285,699 45 




505 49 




78 60 


Public Works 


72,153 28 

22,407 78 

7,309 37 

3,504 97 


82,303 06 
26,494 91 
7,603 64 
4,176 01 


151,451 19 
25,497 24 




38,644 15 




4,277 10 








5.91S 97 
1.287 69 
233 90 
5.543 81 
37.065 51 
5,624 98 


















328 98 

3.196 87 

31,344 15 

14,078 18 


224 87 
2,623 78 
6.932 20 
11,184 13 
76,290 57 
9,041 96 
760 45 
91,435 44 
143 91 
2,253 72 


1,022 91 

12,977 53 

15,325 .50 

15,130 86 

183,660 65 

67,573 31 

697 94 

143,469 88 


94 47 




14.188 71 




16.820 47 




14.222 23 




36.632 65 








26.609 15 




523 26 
82,942 93 

226 90 
13,521 86 


408 85 

77,610 88 

125 .54 

584 92 


8,488 19 




164,805 24 








4,252 88 


1,9.57 33 






Total 


2,401,914 83 


2.569,559 73 


2,151,432 87 


2,532,031 02 


2,297,697 04 







REPORT OF THE ACCOUNTANT 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 33 



5. STATIONERY BRANCH ACCOUNT 



Inventory. April 1, 1920 

.Amount of uooils purchased during fiscal year 1920-21- 

( 'anadian 

Ainprican 

IJritish and Foreign 



45 



S 437,543 98 



1,180.023 02 
57,049 37 
54,195 09 



Amount of other expenditures during fiscal year 1920-21- 

Watres 

( ustoms duties and brokerage 

Froiclit, etc 



1,291,268 08 



110,160 10 

9,093 41 

33, 1.36 13 



152,389 70 
{ 1,881,201 76 



Amount of goods issued to departments and P.arliament during fiscal year 

, 1920-21 $1,362.018 01 

Amount from sale of paper stock inventory to printing branch 217, 137 98 

Amount from sale of waste twine ' n 90 

Amount from sale of waste blotting paper, etc 313 10 



Excess of expenditure over revenue carried to fiscal year 1921-22. 
Inventory on March 31, 1921 ? 



— I,.57'9.480 99 

64,465 41 
237,255 36 



$ 1,881,201 76 



The stock of goods on hand has been decreased $200,288 62 during the fiscal j'ear. 



Statement of Goods^ purchased and Goods i.ssued to Departments and 
Parliament in each month, for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1921. 





Goods Purchased 


Total 


Goods 
Issued 


Month 


British and 
Foreign 


American 


Canadian 


1920 
April 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 


1 cts. 

5,001 46 

88,686 54 

77,457 65 

104,279 09 

99,710 08 

67,777 57 

76,634 37 

162,622 69 

108,101 83 

81,471 53 
121,289 33 
187,003 13 


$ cts. 

5,001 46 

88,686 54 

91.779 85 

119,. 331 28 

101,568 45 

74,935 .30 

78,383 52 

182,200 21 

113,493 77 

81,471 53 
127,066 95 
227,482 66 


$ cts. 
.55,935 85 

108,244 15 
118.469 65 
86,231 21 


May 






June. . 




14,322 20 
6,867 88 
1,858 .37 
1,220 49 

1.749 15 
5,575 45 

1.750 48 


July 


8,184 31 


August 


September 

October 


5,937 24 


91,769 81 
126,444 30 
137,369 87 
150,025 94 

121,222 43 
106,169 03 
186,148 39 


November 


14,002 07 
3,641 46 


1921 
January 


February 


5,777 62 
16,770 68 




March 


23,708 85 




Refunds on goods purchased... 


54,313 38 
117 69 


57,052 87 
' 3 50 


1,180,035 27 
12 25 


1,291,401 52 
133 44 

1,291,268 08 




Totals of goods purchased and 
goods issued 


54, 195 69 


57,049 37 


1,180,023 02 


1,362,018 01 


■ 





33—4 



46 



DEPARTMEXT OF PUBLIC PIi/.\n\G AXD STATIOXERY 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 



Comparative Statement of amount of Goods i.ssued to Departments and 
Parliament for the last five fiscal vears, 1916-17, 1917-18, 1918-19, 
1919-20 and 1920-21. 



Department 


1916-17 


1917-lS 


1918-19 


1919-20 


1920-21 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 

1.403 46 
45.597 06 


1 

S cts. 

1.111 58 
45.815 01 


S cts. 

1,094 55 
49,384 55 
3,309 08 
2,214 22 
6.143 73 


S cts. 
1.059 65 


Agriculture ■ 


35,646 37 


61 170 51 


Air Board . 


28,040 32 
I 282 92 


Archives ... 


1.325 66 
4,966 07 


1.969 43 
6.660 03 


1,.307 24 

4.870 77 

22 00 




9,169 35 


Biological Boaxd . 


2 12 








7.691 20 


4.822 30 


Canada Food Board 




10,227 79 


9.754 90 

3.862 69 

23,909 25 

114 49 










Canadian National Railways 

Canadian ^funitions Resources Commission. . . . 


39.973 90 
223 31 


49.867 01 
187 95 


25,787 35 


27,406 71 




17 38 












9 00 




. 




- 




12 733 52 


Civil Service Commission 


412 SI 
66 05 


2,365 29 

10.554 96 
5 00 


8,823 87 

263 80 

1,409 66 


10.693 62 


22,624 48 








3,262 96 


2,900 38 


Commission of Inquiry, Railways and Trans- 


122 22 












1 896 01 




35.800 97 

1.260 34 

1.121 94 

184 78 


39.435 40 

1.904 67 
1.070 87 


37.811 03 

335 98 

3.847 80 


48,010 30 


62,998 12 








1,947 62 


300 


Economic and Development Commission 




47 29 

184 58 

2,943 51 

43,096 14 

1,067 27 

61 59 

1,566 91 


4 60 

381 72 

4,212 32 

113,472 67 

980 01 




473 39 


Exchequer Court 

External Affairs. 


444 55 

2,416 67 

22,536 97 


382 95 

6,243 00 

96.738 48 

28 80 


276 10 
4,892 37 




94,852 60 


General Consulting Engineer 

Governor General's Secretary. . . 
Health 


65 97 
1,932 10 




1,976 51 


2.276 14 

7,193 65 

14,691 44 

202 31 

13,249 88 

16,460 70 

4,767 88 

2.664 89 

73.800 51 

22 20 

511 82 

4.291 97 

18.305 45 

599 41 

21,858 77 


1,838 30 
16,872 92 


House of Commons . , 


29,359 21 


37,821 si 


8,040 46 

" io!20r04' 

12,531 16 

7,600 95 

1.092 44 

62,396 28 


22,167 06 
7 46 


Immigration and Colonization 

Inland Revenue 

Insurance 

Interior 


«,538 10 

16,982 36 

10.083 29 

3.583 40 

74.388 35 

33 00 

2.222 81 

5.140 96 

1.451 28 

869 33 

17,348 24 

S.433 93 

375,478 41 

9.039 52 


10,395 65 
16.198 35 
8.764 91 
1.438 39 
60,572 39 


23.110 10 

19,850 33 

21,178 14 

2,536 77 

105,471 88 




119 66 


Internment Operations Office 

Justice 

Labour 

Library of Parliament. . 

Marine 

Military Hospitals Commission. . 
Militia and Defence 


1.414 .36 

27.481 54 

3.191 29 

852 23 

17,922 .55 

2S.S13 02 

326,858 S3 

7,817 37 


1.158 19 

37.215 04 

11,954 70 

452 31 

18,611 03 


32 62 

5,742 79 

14,864 03 

597 73 

22,043 80 


460,114 37 
9.485 94 


179.715 89 

12.968 01 

2.135 48 

lis 82 


67,775 88 


Mines 


18,005 06 
1,247 45 




65 63 
17,204 54 


57 14 
1,053 59 


192 77 


596 28 










2,549 92 
54,654 02 




Naval Service 


39,622 01 


105,364 ,58 
59 15 


91,609 14 


60,054 98 










1.818 33 












4.592 12 




1,903 82 

27.145 06 

10S.795 21 

2.538 11 


1,933 08 

71,428 61 

138,001 19 

4.666 13 


2,749 19 

66,553 35 

160.168 13 

8.265 96 

3,986 54 

879,855 02 

34,181 88 

7,636 18 

5,324 39 


3,154 94 

57,358 03 

185,731 96 

1.799 00 

. 2.067 79 

892.745 11 

35,495 17 

21.931 80 

4.742 08 

145 88 

869 79 

543 03 

23.118 68 

11.128 92 

9.493 68 

331.186 38 

179. .329 22 

1,095 32 

25.8.56 06 


5,638 51 


Pension Commissioners. . . 

Post Office 

Privy Council.. 


43,754 84 

205,301 61 

1,360 02 


Public Works 


936,272 31 
29.892 75 
12,647 18 
4,877 81 


925.570 98 
24,903 31 
8,939 60 
3,324 89 


66,200 54 
39,691 45 
23,336 17 


Railway Commission 


5,474 58 
















Royal Mint 


372 30 
12,220 55 
6,579 53 
12.339 14 


553 20 
6,627 S7 
8.664 18 
11,669 96 


501 14 

8,405 30 

6.995 48 

6.999 16 

113,539 89 

12.611 09 

857 10 

22.241 34 

177 67 

2.026 55 


390 65 


Royal Canadian Mounted Police 


29,579 38 
11, .504 00 


Senate of Canada 


8.465 15 
57,320 68 








59,837 68 


Supreme Court 


1.222 34 

19.431 74 

239 04 

558 15 


1.023 17 

18,539 17 

273 12 

346 14 


1,001 54 
55,078 81 


Transcontinental Railway Commission. 




1.268 99 


945 86 






Total . . 


1,943.379 79 


2,102.757 96 


2,339.919 08 


2,485.050 78 


1.362,018 01 







HKFUHT OF TIIE ACCOUNTANT 47 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 33 

G. DKTAIL OF EXPENDITURE OF APPROPHIATIOXS. 

Appropriation — Gratuities $2, 041 44 

Detail of c'xpontlituro. death yratuitios paid to widows or legal representatives of — 

John 'i'hornton H\rnc, f^)i\'iiian rif coniposition, died Deceinber 7, 1919 S 355 84 

Octave Cloutier. 'tnicknian, died May 17, 1920 142 33 

Emile Chenevert, linotype operator, died May 26, 1920 276 67 

W illiain I.arose. clerk-typist, died August 13, 1920 170 00 

John O'Reilly, bookbinder, died August IS, 1920 302 60 

Robert John White, truckman, died October 16. 1920 170 00 

Alexander Baker. Jr.. hand compositor, died January 1, 1921 312 (K) 

Walter J. Kane, proofreader, died January 7, 1921 312 00 



-$ 2,041 44 



Appropriation — Ciiil Gorernmcnt Salaries $ 71,825 00 

Detail of expenditure — 

Salaries paid during the year S 65,209 01 

Unexpended balance 6, 615 99 

S 71,825 00 



Appropriation — Ciril Government Contingencies $ 13,450 00 

Detail of expenditure — 

Charwomen and cleaning .5 714 60 

Office printing 4.003 09 

Office stationery L'.So7 87 

Travelling expenses 4, 349 90 

Cab hire and street car fare 127 50 

Postage , 32 00 

Advertising 521 34 

Newspapers and periodicals 84 73 

Legal expenses 150 00 

Sundries 42 00 



12,883 03 
Unexpended balance 566 97 



13,450 00 



Appropriation — Plant, Rmewals .S .33,000 00 

Detail of expenditure — 

Hand composing division $ 1,535 13 

Monotype division 6, 977 62 

Linotype division 2, 191 84 

Stereotype division . , 127 23 

Press division 14.087 94 

Bindery division 1 , 276 .57 

Die stamping division 41 30 

Map engraving division 80 47 

Divisions generally 2,973 51 

Mechanical division 2,503 52 

Offices 43 79 

Printing Stores division 409 89 

Customs duties .• 513 08 

Brokerage Ill 79 

Freight 106 97 



Total $ 32,980 65 

Unexpended balance 19 35 



33,000 00 



48 DEPARTMEXT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

12 GEORGE V. A. 1922 

AppToprittlion — Miscellaneous Printing $ 100,000 00 

Detail of expenditure — 

Agriculture $ 3, 967 73 

Archives 455 31 

Auditor General ; 2, 185 12 

Civil Service Commission 2, 402 05 

Clerk of the Crown in Chancery 655 77 

Customs 1,836 40 

Editorial t'ommittee 63 65 

External Aftairs 66 42 

Finance 828 33 

Indian Affairs 159 49 

Insurance 4,S1U 28 

Interior 742 50 

Labour. 590 03 

Marine '. 1 , 146 10 

Militia and Defence 216 60 

Mines 875 70 

Naval Service 359 99 

Patent and Copyright Office 106 09 

Penitentiaries 91 24 

Post Office 756 21 

Public Printing and Stationery '. ■ 21 , 742 71 

Public Works '. 1,389 75 

Railways and Canals 470 U 

Railway Commission .131 43 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police 115 34 

Seeretarj' ol State 452 90 

Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment 175 53 

Trade and Commerce •. 29,716 24 



76,709 02 
Unexpended balance 23, 290 98 



$100,000 00 



Appropriation — Canada Gazette $ 51,000 00 

Detail of expenditure — 

Printing of Canada Gazette $ 28,895 91 

Paper used for above 11,716 53 

Editing and translating 2, 508 62 



Postage 

Unexpended balance. 



s 


43,121 06 
400 00 


51 




$ 


43,521 06 

7,478 94 

-$ 


,000 00 



Appropriation — Distribution of Parliamentary Documents t 60, 000 00 

Detail of expenditure — 

Office printing $ 2,708 32 

Office stationer}' 4.584 07 

Postage 1 , 760 00 

Express and freight 104 51 

Telephone and telegraph 14 63 

Sundries 63 59 

Salaries ,....- 37, 205 41 



$ 46,440 53 
Unexpended balance 13 , 559 47 



t 60,000 00 



Appropriation — Printing, binding and distributing the Annual Statutes t 16,000 00 

Detail of expenditure — 

Printing and binding the Annual Statutes t 16,000 00 



Appropriation — Contingent expenses in connection vjilh the Voters' Lists S 5, 000 00 

Unexpended balance S 5,000 00 



ItF.I'OIxT OF TIIF ACCOUNTANT 49 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 33 

At>iirtiitnntiiiH — J*roi'isioiiiit Jiniiits AUimuuirf. . . . . $ 94,907 47 

Detail of cxpondituio — 

Clerical staff $ 94,907 47 

$ 84,907 47 



Aiipropriation — Vvtc Ao. 31, Ciril Service Commission, Public Printing and Stationery, 

Reorganization $ 107,000 00 

Detail of expenditure — 

Retirements $ 11,413 80 

Customs and brokerage 142 63 

Express and freight 521 85 

Printing and stationery , , 451 SO 

Equipment and material 148,540 40 

Overtime l,25(i 78 

Medical services . 148 00 



$ 102,475 26 

Unexpended balance 4, 524 74 

■■ S 167,000 00 



Appropriation — Unforeseen Expenses $ 2,000 00 

Royal Commission of Enquiry re material and equipment purchased and sold. 

Detail of expenditure — 

Travelling and subsistence S 065 85 

Reporting evidence 697 92 

Typing evidence . 61 53 



$ 1,425 30 
Unexpended balance 674 70 



-$ 2,000 00 



33—5 



50 DEPAHTMEST UF PVHLIV f'lilXTIXa AND STATIONERY 

12 GEORGE V. A. 1922 

7. " CANADA GAZETTE." 

Comparative Statement of Receipts and Expenditure on account of Canada 
Gazelle from the year 1874 to the fiscal year ending March 31, 1921. 



Expenditure 



Revenue 



1874... 

1875... 

1876.. 

1877 . 

1878... 

1879... 

1880. . 

1881... 

1882... 

1883... 

1884... 

1885... 

1886... 

1887... 

1888... 

1889... 

1890. . . 

1891... 

1892... 

1893... 

1894.. 

1895... 

1896... 

1897... 

1898... 

1899... 

1900... 

1901 . . . 

1902... 

1903... 

1904... 

1905... 

1906... 

1907... 

1908... 

1909... 

1910... 

1911... 

1912... 

1913... 

1914... 

1915. . 

1916... 

1917... 

1918... 

1919... 

1920... 

1921... 



Copies 
Gratis 



1.04.5 
1,077 
1,049 
1,084 
1,108 
1,115 
1.170 
1,251 
1,238 
1.250 
1,290 
1,321 
1,318 
1,366 
1,369 
1,367 
1,429 
1,436 
1,439 
1,426 
1,418 
1,425 
1,428 
1.492 
1,438 
1,486 
1,529 
1,528 
1,553 
1,545 
1,559 
1,573 
1,559 
1.616 
1,625 
1,665 
1,692 
1,725 
1,742 
1,754 
1,791 
1.907 
1,901 
991 
1.000 
1,303 
1,278 
1,259 



Sub- 
scrib- 
ers 



85 
88 
81 
79 
85 
70 
68 
92 
109 
85 
69 
77 
84 
81 
S3 
71 
84 
86 
84 
82 
75 
72 
83 
87 
89 
96 
97 
97 
105 
116 
177 
191 
184 
200 
185 
208 
250 
258 
271 
284 
293 
424 
484 
600 
797 
722 
1.321 



Paper 



Printing 

and 

Distribution 



$ cts. 
1,142 17 

1,177 17 
1,195 98 
1,292 25 
1,016 65 
1,195 21 
1.208 48 
1,197 38 
1,360 61 
1,414 24 
1,428 16 
1,404 76 

1.683 88 
1,979 21 
2.164 85 
1,883 83 
1.758 .50 
1,492 62 
1.480 19 
1.485 71 
1,181 66 
1,153 87 
1 , 129 52 
1,129 07 
1,450 21 

940 43 
1,092 72 
1,349 79 
1,430 89 
1,315 56 
1,427 48 

1.684 85 
1.629 58 
1,322 63 
1,805 72 
2,053 45 
2,158 56 
2,548 44 
2.943 28 
4,385 03 
2,720 73 
4,502 28 
3,018 22 
4,088 93 
6,966 17 
5,249 59 
4.693 32 

11.716 53 



$ cts. 
2.416 40 
2,144 00 
2,301 51 
2,323 45 
2,139 48 
2,293 81 
2,307 72 
2.132 20 
2,261 85 
2,181 48 
2,219 00 
2.243 43 
2,241 65 
2.537 79 
2.933 57 
2.859 19 
3,128 36 
2,060 45 
2,069 36 
2,826 07 
2.485 08 
2.704 36 
3.007 00 
3,003 51 
3,803 11 
3,273 01 
3,640 17 
4,267 81 
3,858 22 
3,999 78 
4.368 81 
6.125 57 
6.909 57 
4,248 17 
7.484 48 
7,319 99 
6,983 10 
9,532 19 
9.600 27 
19,349 44 
15,477 24 
22.597 68 
14.978 79 
14.248 76 
28,214 72 
28,743 33 
42,850 34 
28,895 91 



Transla- 
tion 



Subscrip- 
tions 



Advertising 



S cts. 
119 45 
135 55 
184 80 
141 SO 
125 80 
123 90 
106 30 
137 40 
197 60 
215 30 
148 24 
169 44 
72 20 
389 10 
349 80 
103 60 
204 00 
211 85 
188 98 
240 54 
265 10 
232 50 
259 75 
245 40 
337 10 

255 30 
289 50 

256 60 
284 00 
253 60 
309 80 
364 80 
460 85 
329 20 
709 80 
587 60 
815 80 
91^ 55 
438 60 

3,261 07 
3.842 06 
4.202 56 
2,905 34 
'2,658 00 
'3,764 71 
'3,007 00 
'3,268 00 
■2,508 62 



$ cts. 
242 20 

242 80 
241 80 
224 75 
268 40 
246 50 

243 90 
253 65 
378 44 
367 25 
414 67 
169 45 
299 70 
321 40 

307 35 

308 60 
487 95 
324 18 
313 47 
306 50 
298 73 
281 65 
276 65 
298 55 
312 70 
329 95 
350 00 
329 65 
361 80 
371 85 
430 40 
604 12 
750 00 
524 27 
762 15 
721 20 
775 25 
949 85 
979 15 

1,034 20 
1.090 05 
1.121 45 
1,505 58 
1,677 20 
2,335 35 
3,071 10 
2,746 00 
5,251 00 



$ cts. 
931 43 

943 74 

578 41 

681 62 

683 47 

739 82 

862 38 

1,028 04 

2,706 28 

2,181 53 

6,658 12 

2S9 35 

2,020 82 

2,831 04 

2,909 72 

4, 637 49 

2,777 03 

3,309 65 

3,436 32 

4,612 37 

3,545 87 

4,015 64 

4.678 69 
4,992 94 
5.574 45 
3.948 65 

4.679 98 
4,370 82 
4,451 39 
5,667 65 
4,523 25 
6.997 50 
7.644 35 
6.821 20 
8,472 51 
8,684 40 

14,219 41 
15,844 95 
21,077 11 
30,804 59 
23,062 88 
18,322 04 
28.357 80 
.35.885 58 
29,671 57 
26,342 60 
47,579 26 
55,230 57 



Loss 



t cts. 
2,494 59 
2,635 13 
2,836 11 
2.743 13 
2,318 53 
2,613 60 
2,538 09 
2.085 29 

735 34 
1.262 24 
1,727 48 
2,363 14 
1.576 21 
1,571 66 
2.231 15 



1,825 88 
331 70 



89 24 



190 14 

147373 
759 92 



1 , 152 44 
573 60 
605 65 



765 34 
555 44 



Gain 



11,441 02 



6,938 68 

7,586 22 

486 40 



i cts. 



47 



11 26 
366 55 



206 56 
559 07 
913 51 
296 73 



7 59 



470 56 



1,445 47 



4,037 20 
3,795 62 
9,074 11 
4,843 25 
2,112 80 



8,961 03 
16.567 09 



17.960 51 



' Translating and editing. 



REPORT OF TIIK ACCOVNTANT 



51 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 33 

8. CASUAL liEVENUE ACCOUNT. 

Detail of proceeds of Casual Revenue sales made during the fiscal year ending 

March 31, 1921. 

Sales of pariianionlai-y publirations to departments and Parliament % 12, 109 02 

Sales of parliamentary publications to the public 27. 120 74 

Sales of Cannda Gazette and of advertising 

Sales of subscriptions 



$ 

56.230 57 
5.251 00 



Sales of waste paper and empty cases. . 

Sales of voters' lists 

Sales of discarded printing equipment 



39,229 76 


61,481 57 

11,7.34 15 

9 06 

38.800 40 



Total % 151,314 94 



9. RAILWAY PRINTING AUDIT. 

The amount of accounts auditeil at this depart nu-nt during the fiscal year 
ending March 31, 1921, for printing, binding, lithographing, etc., for the 
Canadian National Railways, was .S287,052.37. These accounts lieing paid by 
the railways for which the printing is done, the amount is not inclutled in the 
statement of receipts and expenditure of this department. 

Below is a statement of the total amount of accounts audited by this 
department, from 1890-91 to 1920-21. 



Fiscal Year 


Amount 


Increase 


Decrease 


1890-91 


$ cts. 

49,021 53 

59, 268 59 

95,976 .55 

104,026 24 

110, .528 56 

1 48.. 575 51 

141,631 99 

140,1.56 30 

1,S8.774 31 

208.669 43 

225.469 95 

193.708 16 

287.052 37 


$ cts. 


% cts. 


1900-01 


10,247 06 

36,707 96 

8,049 69 

6.. 502 32 

38,046 95 




1910-11 




19II-I2 




1912-13 




191.3-14 




1914-15 


6.943 52 


1915-16 

1916-17... . 


■isieis oi 

19.895 12 
16,800 52 

93,34421 


1.475 69 


1917-18 




1918-19 




1919-20 


31,761 79 


1920-21 









52 DEPARTMEST OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIOXERY 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 
10. GOVERNMENT NEWSPAPER ADVERTISING. 

The total amount certified by this department for government advertising 
during the fiscal year ending IMarch 31, 1921, was §183,656.65, the details of 
which are set forth in a statement on page 19. These accounts being paid by 
the several departments for which the advertising is done, the amount is not 
included in the statement of receipts and expenditure of this department. 

The number of advertising accounts audited was 9,769; contracts to the 
number of 8,069 were issued, of which 4,087 were for transient advertising and 
3 ,982 for space contract advertising. 

There was, moreover, a considerable amount of correspondeace in con- 
nection therewith. 

Below is a statement of the total amount of advertising accounts audited 
by this department from the year 1876 to the fiscal year ending March 31, 1921, 
inclusive. 



1876 


Calend.4R Years. 


.,$ 12, .529 27 
.. 12,751 56 
.. 20,583 77 
. . 39, 676 60 
.. 63,092 50 
.. 30,015 44 
.50,604 71 


1S98-1899 


Fiscal Years. 


. $ 27,699 72 


1877 

1878 

1879 

1880 

1881..-. 

1882 


1899-1900 

1900-1901 

1901-1902 

1902-1903 

1903-1904 

1904-1905 

1905-1906 

1906-1907 

1907-1908 

1908-1909 . 


(MarciiSi)' 


... 46,317 74 
... 50,790 40 
53,850 75 
... 41,078 02 
... 57,898 72 
. 102. S48 11 


1883 

1884 




. 30,149 31 
39 401 48 


.. 107,812.56 
89,329 77 


1885 

1886 

1887 




.. 33,782 53 
.. 25.102 83 
.. 4S.596 03 
.. 44,520 30 
.. 35,939 47 


... 141,200 45 
.. . 156,673 50 


1888 

1889 


1909-1910 

1910-1911 

1911-1912 

1912-1913 

1913-1914 

1914-1915 

1915-1916 

1916-1917 

1917-1918 .... 




... 102,841 15 
... 144,081 66 


1890 




26,102 48 


. . 166,224 26 


1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1896 


to JiineSO, i898)!!!"!l 


.. 27,519 59 
.. 24,819 54 
. . 26, 704 27 
.. 26,423 72 
.. 27,424 68 
.. 30.760 76 
.. 35.138 54 
.. 16.312 58 


... 204.762 87 
... 247,477 61 
... 200,441 19 
... 210,818 48 
... 295,694 98 
... 496,045 77 


1897 

1898 (6 mos. 


♦1918-1919 

1919-1920 

1920-1921 




... 622,197 21 
... 235,603 93 
... 183,656 65 









• Includes aHvertising of Victory Loan, 1918, amount $184,06-4.59, contracted for with Canadian Press 
Association. 



HElOliT OF Tin-: ACCdlWTAXT 



53 



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12 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 33 A. 1922 



STATIONERY BRANCH. 

Ottawa, Octuhor 31, 1921. 

F. A. AcLAND, Esq., 

King's Printer and Controller of Stationery, 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit, for your information, a general state- 
ment of accounts of this branch, from Ajjrij I, 1920, to March 31, 1921, as 
follows: — 

Value of goods brought forward, April 1, 1920 $ 437,543 98 

Value of goods received, April 1, 1920, to ISIarch 31, 

1921 1,291,268 08 

Wages charges against stock 1 10,160 16 

Customs dutj' and brokerage 9,093 41 

Office Printing and Stationery, freight, etc 33,136 13 

$ 1,881,201 76 

By goods issued to departments $ 1,362,018 01 

Sale of Printing paper Stock as per Inventory April 

7, 1920 217,137 98 

Sale of damaged twine 11 90 

Sale of ilamaged blotting paper, etc 313 10 

Stock on hand, verified March 31, 1921 237,255 36 

$ 1,816,636 35 
Balance to debit of account 1921-22 64,465 41 

$ 1,881,201 76 

The decrease in value of goods issued to departments, compared with the 
year 1919-20, amounted to .11,123,032.77, owing to the flat paper, etc., usually 
supplied for Printing Branch (work book accounts) being taken over by the 
said Branch. 

The decrease in salaries, etc., charged against stock amounts to $10,133.03. 

The decrease of stock on hand amounted to .1200,288.62, owing to the 
flat printing papers, etc., being transferred to the Printing Branch. 

The debit balance, carried to year 1921-22, amounts to $64,465.41. 

Respectfully yours, 

EDMUND RYDER, 

Superintendent of Stationery. 



55 



12 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 A. 1922 



REPORT 



OF THE 



SECRETARY OF STATE 



FOR 



EXTERNAL AFFAIRS 



FOR THE 
YEAR ENDING MARCH 31 

1921 

FRlSrSD BY ORDER OF PARLIAMENT 




OTTAWA 

F. A. ACLAND 

PRINTER TO THE KINGS MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY 

1921 

[No. 34—1922 
23971—1 



12 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 A. 1922 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Consuls in Canada, Alphabetical list of forei^ 9 

Countries having Consular representation in Canada, Alphabetical list of . . . . 1-4 
TJnder-Secretary of State. Eeport of 5 



12 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 A 1922 



To General, His Excellency,, The Right Honourable Lord Byng of Viml-y, G.C.B., 
G.O.M.G., M.V.O., etc., etc., etc.. Governor General and Commander in Chief 
of the Dominion of Canada. 

My Lord : 

I have the liouour to lay before Tour Excellency the annual report of the Depart- 
ment of External Affairs for the year 1920-21. 

I have the honour to be, My Lord, 

Your Lordship's obedient servant, 

ARTHUE MEIGHEN, 

Secretary of State for External Affdirs. 
Ottawa, October .31, 1921. 



23971— 1 J 



12 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 A. 192i! 



REPORT OF THE UNDER SECRETARY OF STATE FOR 

EXTERNAL AFFAIRS 



The Eight Honourable Arthur Meighen, 

Secretary of State for External Affairs, 
Ottawa. 

Sir, — I submit the customary annual review of the principal matters which have 
engaged the attention of the department during the past year. 

PEACE TREATIES 

Progress has continued to be made with the task of completing the peace settle- 
ment. 

The peace treaty with Austria was duly ratified on the 16th July, that with 
Bulgaria on the 9th August, 1920; treaties also being concluded with Hungary on the 
4th June and with Turkey on the 10th August, 1920. 

On the 5th July at Paris a treaty was signed between the British Empire, France, 
Italy, Japan, and Denmark, transferring to the last-named power, under the provi- 
sions of the peace treaty with Germany, a portion of Slesvig. This treaty was ratified 
by His Majesty on the 15th December, 1920. 

At the same time as the treaty with Turkey were signed : 

1. A treaty between the Principal Allied and Associated Powers and Poland, 
Rumania, and the Serb-Croat-Slovene State regarding central European frontiers. 

2. A treaty between the British Empire, France, Italy, Japan and Greece r^arding 
minorities. 

3. A treaty between the same Powers transferring- Thrace to Greece. 

4. A treaty between the British Empire, France, Italy, Japan, and Armenia 
regarding minorities. 

A treaty between the British Empire, France, Italy, Japan, and Rumania 
recognizing Rumania's sovereignty over Bessarabia was signed at Paris on the 
18th November, 1920, His Majesty's Ambassador at Paris signing on behalf of 
Canada. 

The Canadian plenipotentiary in the case of these treaties, excepting (the 
Bessarabian treaty with Rumania, was Sir George Perley, the High Commissioner 
at London. 

His Majesty's ratification has also been given to the following treaties : — 

1 . Treaty between the Principal Allied and Associated Powers and the Serb-Croat- 
Slovene State regarding minorities, ratified 17th August, 1920. 

2. The similar treaty with Rumania, ratified 12th January, 1921. 

3. The convention between the British Empire, United States of America, 
Belgium, France, Italy, Japan, and Portugal, relative to the liquor traffic in Africa, 
signed at St. Germain, 10th September, 1919, ratified 31st July, 1920. 

4. A treaty between the Principal Allied and Associated Powers and Czecho- 
slovakia regarding minorities, ratified 17th August, 1920. 

5. The convention revising the General Act of Berlin, 1885, and the General 
Act and Declaration of Brussels, 1890, ratified 31st July, 1920. 



6 DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

As provided in the peace treaty with Germany, notice was given the German 
Government on the 25th June, 1920, reviving the following bilateral treaties with 
that Power in which Canada is interested : — 

1. Treaty for the mutual svirrender of fugitive criminals, 1-lth May, 1872. 

2. Parcel Post Agreement signed, London, 3rd November, Berlin, l-lth November, 
1894, as subsequently modified 24th January and 6th February, 1920. 

3. Money Orders Agreement signed, London, 9th January, 1907, Berlin, Sth 
February, 1908, with modifications subsequently effected or made necessary by the 
termination of the Treaty of Versailles. 

In like manner, in accordance with Article 241 of the Treaty with Austria, 
notice was given to the Austrian Government on the 22nd September, 1920, reviving 
as from that date the extradition treaty between Great Britain and Austria of the 
3rd December, 1873, with the amending Declaration of the 2'6th June, 1901. 

OTHER TREATIES 

With Canada's concurrence a Convention was signed at London on the 1st June. 
1920, renewing the Arbitration Convention between His Majesty and the Queen of 
The Netherlands of the iJth February, 1905, for a further period of five years dating 
from the 12th July, 1920. 

The treaty between His Majesty and Brazil of the 4th April, 1919, providing for 
the establishment of a Peace Commission was ratified the 11th March, 1921. 

TRADE AGREF.^rE^'T WITH FRAXCE 

Advantage was taken of the presence in Europe as one of the delegates to the League 
of Nations Assembly, of Sir George Foster for the negotiation of a trade agreement to 
serve as a modus vivendi pending the conclusion of a new commercial treaty with 
France. It was signed at Paris on the 29th January, 1921, and having been approved 
by the Canadan Parliament was brought into force as from the 3rd May, 1921. In 
return for most-favoured nation treatment accorded by Canada to French products in 
respect of tariff, esrportation, transit, and internal taxes, France agreed to give the 
benefits of her minimum tariff or a percentage rebate from the general tariff to a list of 
enumerated Canadian products. 

LEAGUE OF NATIONS ASSEMBLY 

The first meeting of the Assembly of the League of Nations to be held at Geneva 
on the 15th November, 1920, was summoned by the President of the United States 
in fulfilment of the duty entrusted to him by the Covenant of the League. Canada 
was represented at this meeting by the Right Honourable Sir George Foster, the Eight 
Honourable C. J. Doherty, and the Honourable N. W. Powell. The following six 
additional States were admitted to the League: Albania, Austria, Bulgaria, Costa 
Pica, Finland, and Luxemburg. Amongst subjects discussed were the measures to 
combat the menace of tJTphus in Europe, and for the prevention of trafiic in opium, 
and the traffic in women and children. The question of help for children who had 
suffered by the war was also considered. 

A statute was adopted establishing a Permanent Court of Justice for the decision 
of disputes by the members of the League, and a protocol accepting this statute 
was signed by the representatives of the participating states. 



DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS 7 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCES 

The Geiie,ral Lahour Conference of the League of Nations held its second meeting 
at Geneva on the 15th June, 1920, its session lasting until the 10th July. The 
Canadian Government was represented by Mr. Philippe Roy, the Commissioner 
General at Paris, and Mr. G. J. Desbarats, the Deputy Minister of the N'aval Service; 
Canadian employers by Mr. Thomas Rowe; and Canadian workmen by Mr. J. C. 
Gauthier. 

Draft Conventions (three) were adopted, fixing a minimum age for the employ- 
ment of children at sea; concerning indemnity for iinemployment in case of loss or 
foundering of a ship; and for establishing facilities for finding employment for sea- 
men. 

Further, recommendations were adopted concerning the limitation of hours at 
work in the fishing industiy and in inland navigation, the establishment of national 
seamen's codes and unemployment insurance for seamen. 

An International Financial Conference of representatives of members of the 
League of Nations was convened by the Council and held at Brussels in September- 
October, 1920, to study the world-wide financial crisis and to consider methods for 
remedying it and mitigating its consequences. Canada's representatives were the 
Honouralile Hugh Guthrie, Mr. G. C. Cassels, and Mr> J. H. Gundy. A report was 
presented to the Council of the League recommending measures considered necessary 
for meeting the situation, such as a general restriction of Government expenditures, 
reduction of armaments, the checking of inflation of currency, and meeting of current 
expenditures out of revenue. 

The Seventh Congress of the Universal Postal Union was held at Madrid in 
October-November, 1920, the Honourable P. E. Blondin, Postmaster General, and 
Dr. E. M. Coulter, the Deputy Postmaster General, attending as Canada's repre- 
sentatives. As they found it necessary to return before the termination of the pro- 
ceedings, Brig.-Gen. F. H. Williamson, C.B.E., Chief of the British Delegation, 
being duly empowered, signed on behalf of Canada on the SOth' November, igSO, the 
revised Universal Postal Convention to come into force the 1st January, 1922. 

The Fifteenth International Congress against Alcoholism was held at Washington 
in September, 1920, Chief Justice Sir Francis Lemieux, and the Rev. Andrew S. Grant 
attending as representatives of the Canadian Government. 

A preliminary Conference of Representatives of the Principal Allied and Asso- 
ciated Powers on Electrical Communications was summoned to meet at Washington 
to consider international aspects of communication by telegraph, telephone, wireless 
telegraph, and wireless telephone in preparation for a genecal Conference to be later 
assembled. Mr. L. C. Christie, Legal Adviser of the Department, Mr. C. P. Edwards 
of the Department of the Naval Service, and Mr. George D. Perry, General Manager 
of the Canadian National Telegraphs were present on behalf of the Canadian Gov- 
ernment. The disposal of German cables seized during the war, the amalgamation 
and revision of the International Telegraph and Radio Telegraph Conventions, 
International cable, and radio law and cable landing rights were some of the ques- 
tions discussed. 

RELATIONS W"ITH THE UNITED STATES 

Of questions in which our immediate relations with the United States are con- 
cerned there might be noted : — 

1. The final settlement of the membership of the Peace Commission under the 
Peace Commission Treaty of the 15th September, 1914, which has been fixed as 
follows : — 



8 DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

Umpire — Professor Nansen; 

British National delegate — Viscount Bryce ; 

or in the alternative in cases concerning Canada — Sir Charles 
Fitzpatrick ; 

Australia — the High Commissioner; 

Newfoundland — Sir Robert Stout; 

South Africa — Mr. W. P, Schreiner; 
British non-National delegate — Monsieur Millerand ; 
United States National delegate — Judge Grey; 
United States non-National delegate — Senhor DaGama. 

2. Pollution of boundary waters. In this matter, carrying out a duty com- 
mitted to it by the Canadian and United States Governments, the International 
Joint Commission prepared and submitted the draft of a Convention intended to 
confer upon that body authority to remedy the existing conditions of pollution in the 
boundary waters so that the policy laid down in Article 4, Boundary Waters Treaty, 
might be effectually enforced. This draft is now under consideration. 

TRADE AGREEMENT WITH THE WEST INDIES 

With the object of improving trade relations and communications between the 
Dominion and the British West Indian Colonies, at the suggestion of the Canadian 
Government a Conference was assembled at Ottawa in May-June, 1920. Repre- 
sentatives of Canada, the Bahamas, Barbados, Bermuda, British Guiana, British 
Honduras, Jamaica, Leeward Islands, Trinidad, and Windward Islands took part in 
the deliberations, as a result of wliicK an agreement was signed at Otawa on the 
18th June providing for preferential tariff treatment for Canadian goods entering 
any of these Colonies. Arrangements were also agreed upon in regard to the estab- 
lishment of the steamship service between Canada and the eastern group and between 
Canada and the western group of the West Indian Colonies concerned. The agree- 
ment was subject to the approval of the Parliament of Canada, of the Legislature of 
each of the West Indian Colonies, and of the Secretary of State for the Colonies. 
Such approval having been given by the Canadian Parliament, the Legislatures of 
certain of the West Indian Colonies, and the Colonial Secretary, the agreement was 
brought into operation as regards the approving Colonies on the 10th May, 1921. 

PASSPORTS 

The work of the Passport Office shows no diminution and judging from the 
widespread adoption and enforcement of a passport system by Governments every- 
where, it may be aceept_ed that the increased business has reached a stage of per- 
manency. The number of passports issued during the past year was 30,641, the 
revenue received in this connection being $62,954.'T9. 

I record with pleasure my appreciation of the zealous and efficient way in which 
the duties of the various members of the staff have been discharged. 

I have the honour to be, sir. 

Your obedient servant, 

JOSEPH POPE, 

Under-Secretary of State for External Affairs. 
Ottawa. May 31, 1921. 



DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS 9 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 

APPENDIX A. 

Alphabetical List of Foreign Consuls, Vice-Consuls, Consular Agents and 
Commercial Agents in the Dominion, according to the latest information 
supplied to the Department of External Affairs. 



Name. 



Adams, Ed. L 

Allison, M. A 

Amoroso, G 

Anderson, P. B 

Angwin, J. G 

AnidcC. E 

Arregui del Campo, 
J. B 

Aubert, L. C. M 

Barattieri, di San Pie- 
tro. Count G 

Barnaby, A. C 

Barranco, C. A 

Barranco y Fernandez 
C 

Barry, J. R 

Beebe, H. S 

Bourgouin, J. H 

Bell, C. N 

Berdiales, M. F 

Biorke. C..J 

Black, W. A 

Black, W. A 

lUaokford, W 

Blair, F. N 

BoUini, A. T 

Bouillon, E. A. A 

Brand, N. F 

Bravo Y. Puig, Leonar- 
do 

Briggs, L.P 

Brittain, J. J 

Brown, R. U 

Bukowierki, Olszewski 

Burdon, H. E 

Call, B. N 

Campbell, G. D 

Carter, E. H 

Carosella, L 

Chapman, R. E 

Chao Tsong Tian 

Chevalier, E 

Clinton, G. W 

CoUart, T 

Cochran, H. M 

CoUis, E.J 

Como, Cant, di V. C . 

Coppley, G.C 

Cox, H 

Creaghan, J. A. ..... . 

Creaghan, J. A 

Cresse, L. G. A., K.C 

Crosby, O. .J 

Crosson, F. J 

Culver, H. S 

Cumberford. S 

Cummings, E. A 

Curren, A. E 

Curren, A. E 



Consul 

Consul 

Consular Agent. 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 



Consul 

Consul General., 



Consular Agent. 
Consular Agent . 
Actg. Con. Gen. 



Designation. 



Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent 

Actg. Con. Agt 

Consul 

Uhancellor 

Vice. Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

\'ice-Con8ul 

Acting Vice-Consul. 

Consul General 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 



Consul 

Consul 

Consul General 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

C^onsular Agent 

Consular Agent 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Acting Consular Agent. 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Acting Consular Agent. 

Consular Agent 

Consular Agent 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Commercial Attache.. . 

Commercial Consul 

Consular Agent 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Honorary Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

"^onsul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Commercial Agent 



Country. 



United States.. 

Portugal 

Italy 

Sweden 

Sweden 

Cuba 



Spain.. . . 
Norway. 



Italy 

United States., 
Cuba 



Cuba 

United States 

United States 

l>ance 

Guatemala 

Cuba 

Norway 

Panama 

Netherlands 

United States 

Portugal 

Argentine Republic... 

Brazil 

United States 



Cuba 

United States. 
United States.. 
United States.. 

Poland 

United States. 
United States.. 

Cuba 

United States.. 

Italy 

United States.. 

China 

France 

United States.. 

Belgium 

United States.. 
United States.. 

'taly 

Roumania 

United States.. 

Sweden 

Sweden 

Guatemala 

United States. 
United States.. 
United States.. 

Chile 

United States.. 

Belgium 

Brazil 



Sherbrooke 

St. John, N.B... 
Hamilton, Ont. 
Winnipeg, Man. . 
Sydney, N.S.... 
Toronto, Ont.... 



Montreal, Que.. 
Montreal, Que., 



Residence. 



When 

Ap- 

pointed. 



Winnipeg, Man 

Bridgewater, N.S. 
Ottawa 



Toronto, Ont 

Montreal, Que.... 
Beebe Jet., Que.. 

Winnipeg 

Winnipeg, Man. . . 

Halifax, N.S 

Vancouver, B.C. 

Halifax, N.S 

Halifax, N.S 

Calffary. Alta.... 
Rimouski, Que... 

Ottawa, Ont 

Paspebiac, Que... 
Fernie, B.C 



Halifax, N.S 

Rivieie du Loup 

Winnipeg, Man 

Yarmouth, N.S 

Winnipeg, Man 

Ocean Fall.'^. H.C 

Newcastle, N.B 

Weymouth, N.S 

St. John, N.B 

Fernie, B.C 

Niagara Falls, Ont... 

.Ottawa, Ont 

Vancouver, B.C 

Cumberland, B.C — 

Prince Rupert 

Montreal, Que 

Sault Ste. Marie, Ont 

^1 ntreal. Que 

Hamilton, Ont 

Edmonton, Alta 

Chatham, N.B 

Newcastle, N.B 

Montreal and Quebec. 

Vancouver, B.C 

Sydney, N.S 

St. John, N.B 

.\mherst, N.S 

Moncton, N.B 

Halifax, N.S 

Halifax, N.S 



1919 
1903 
1918 
1917 
1906 
1918 

1919 
1917 

1910 
1920 
1921 

1918 
1919 
1909 
1905 
1896 
1919 
I!) 
1910 
1911 
111 
1913 
1920 
1918 
1918 

1920 
111 
1919 
1915 
19^0 
WO 
1904 
1913 
1919 
1917 
1917 
1915 
1920 
1918 
1919 
1920 
1918 
1920 
19^0 
1915 
1919 
1919 
1913 
19 
1917 
1910 
19 '1 
1916 
1889 
1913 



no 



DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS 

12 GEORGE V. A. 1922 



Alphabetical List of Foreign Consuls, Vice-Consuls, Consular Agents and 
Commercial Agents, etc.^ — Continued. 



Name. 



Designation. 



Country. 



Residence. 



When 

Ap- 

pointed. 



Davies, J. R 

Davison, J. M 

Danovaro, G 

deAngelis, G 

de Dardel, Carl Otto. 

Defries, R. L 

DeLamater, H. I 



Denison, F. C 

Dennison, A. H 

de Olivares. Jose 

de Saint Victor, R 

DeVVolf, .1. E 

Diederich, H. W 

Donaldson, D 

Dul.uc..4..I. H 

Duggan, F. M 

Duggan, F. M 

Dupont, R 

Dybhavn, John 

Eakins. A. W 

Echeverria Velasquez 

Y.K 

Edgett. O.B 

Edwards, M. D 

Edwards, T. D 

Feiran. H 

Emanuels, S. J 

Erzinger. J 

Estrada, J. de 

Falardeau, A 

Fprnandez. M. de D.. 

Firth, T. A 

Fortuvn, L. D 

Foster, J. G 

Frechette, O 

Frechette, O 

Frechette, O 

Frechette, O 

Freeman, CM 

Futcher, F. A 



Gaboury, E 

Garrett, A. B 

Gaxiola, CM.... 

rrirouv. A. B. 

Gintzburger, S — 
Glionna, Dr. G... 

Goor, M 

Gordon, J. A 

Grassi. G 

Gunsaulus. E. N.. 

Hackett, W 

Hackett.W 

Falstead, A 

Hammond, J. W.. 

Hanson, O 

Hanson. ( > 

Hart, G. R 

Hatheway, F 

Hatheway, \V. F. 
Hechler, Henrv... 
Hendrick, M. J... 



Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent 

Consular Agent 

Acting Consul General . 

Consul 

Vice-Consul • 



Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Consular Agent 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

.\cting Vice-Consul. 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 



Vice-Consul. . . . 
Consular Agent. 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

^'onsul 



Vice Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul General.. 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Consul General.. 

Consul 

Actg. Consul 

Vice-Consul 



-Acting Consular Agent. 

Consul 

('onsul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Acting Vice-Consul 

Consul General 

Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent 

Consul (leneral 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

^'onsul General 

Consular Agent 

Acting Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul 



Sweden 

Sweden 

Italy 

Italy 

Sweden 

Honduras 

United States.. 

United States.. 
United States.. 
United States.. 

France 

Mexico 

United States.. 
Un ted States . 

Belgium 

Sweden 

Norway 

Relgium 

Norway 

Cuba 



Costo Rica . . . . 
United States.. 

Sweden 

United States.. 

Heliium 

Brazil 

Switzerland 

Uruguay 

Peru 

Brazil 

Sweden 

Netherlands... 
Unit«d States., 

Spain 

Chile 

Colombia 

Portugal 

United States.. 
Norway 



France 

United States 

Mexico 

United States 

Switzerland 

Italy 

Belgium 

Argentine Republic. 

Italy 

United States 

Norway 

Portugal 

United States 

United States 

Sweden 

■>wp 'en 

Brazil 

France 

Gauteraala'. 

Liberia 

United States 



Pictou, N.S 

Halifax, N.S 

Welland, Ont 

Edmonton, Alta 

Montreal, Que 

Toronto, Ont 

Fort William and Pt. 

Arthur, Ont 

Prescott, Ont 

Quebec, Que 

Hamilton, Ont 

Quebec, Que 

Halifax, N.S 

Samia, Ont 

Toroto 

Winnipeg, Man 

Quebec, Que 

Quebec, Que 

Quebec. Que 

Prince Rupert, B.C. . . 
Yarmouth, N.S 



Montreal 

Lethbridge 

St. John, N.B 

Cornwall. Ont 

Ottawa, Ont 

Vancouver, B.C 

Winnipeg, Man 

Toronto, Ont 

Quebec, Que 

'-■alifa-. N.S 

Dawson 

Winnipeg. Man 

Ottawa, Ont 

Quebec, Que 

Quebec, Que 

Quebec, Que 

Quebec, Que 

Halifax, N.S 

Victoria and Chem- 

ainus, B.C 

Halifax, N.S 

St. Stephen, N.B 

Toronto. Ont 

Ouehof, Que 

Vancouver, B.C 

Toronto, Ont 

Ottawa, Ont 

Montreal, Que 

Sault Ste. Marie, Ont 

Halifax, N.S 

North Sydney, N.S... 
North Sydney, N.S... 

Montreal, Que 

Fredericton, N.B 

Prince Rupert, B.C. . . 

Virtoria, B.C 

Halifax, N.S 

St. .lohn, N.B 

St. John, N.B 

Halifax, N.S 

Windsor, Ont 



1884 
1906 
1918 
1920 
1919 
1913 

1920 
1915 
1919 
1914 
1913 
1906 
1919 
1920 
1905 
1910 
19 
1920 
1918 
1907 

1921 
1919 
1913 
1917 
19 
1915 
1913 
1914 
1916 
19 
1920 
1920 
1903 
1898 
1885 
1909 
1908 
1920 

1907 
1916 
1917 
1920 
19'^0 
1913 
1918 
1913 
1908 
1914 
19 
1910 
1910 
19 
1916 
1920 
19 
1893 
1910 
1898 
1903 
1917 



DEPARTMENT OF EXTERN Ah AFFAIRS 



11 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 

Alphabetical List of Foreign Consuls, Vice-Consuls, Consular Agents and 
Commercial Agents, etc. — Continued. 



Name. 



Designation. 



Country. 



Residence. 



When 

Ap- 

pointed. 



Hendericks, P. M 

Hernandez, B 

Heubach, Claude 

Herbert, E.E 

Howard, S. B 

Hill, J. M 

Hill, J. M 

Huebscher, C. P 

Huntingdon, H. R.. . . 

Hutchinson, G. A 

Inches, Cyrus F 

Jenvrin, P. G 

Johnson, C. E 

Johnson, F. C 

Johnson, J. P 

Johnston, F. S. S 

Johnston, J. H 

Jones, W. G 

Kelly, N. A 

f eiiiplT, L 

Kerman, W. S 

I- err, ]>. C 

Kerr, Geo 

Forte, !■. J 

Labbie, A. P 

*Lacroix, Ed 

Ladner, L 

Lameda. E. A. . . 

T aniiTro. T orenzo 

LeBoutillier, C S 

LeBoutiller, 0. S 

Ledingham, W. D 

LeGros. P. E 

Leonard, C. F 

Le Quesne, J. C 

Levasseur, T 

LeVatte, H. C. V 

Livingston. C. L 

Lopez, Armando 

Macdonald, W. G 

Macheras, A 

Mack, J. M 

Maitland, R. R 

IVarchand, R ; 

Marino, E 

Marker, C. P 

Martin, C. W 

Martin, H 

Masi, N 

Mason, J. J 

Mason, T.J 

Mathers, H. I 

Mathers, H. I 

Mathers, H.I 

McCunn, J. N 

>'oOs'er. J. A 

Merrill, E.C 

Mersereau, CM 

J i.l ols, C. R 

Milano, A 

Miles, Henry 

Miller, H. C 

Mills. .F W 

Milner, J. B 

Mitchell, W. A 

Morales y Ubeda, A. . 



Acting Vice-Consul — 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul General 

Honorary Vice-Consul. 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

^^onsular Agent 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

V ice-( 'onsul 

Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

f 'onsul 1 encral 

Vice-Consul 

i-e-( 'onsul 

Vice-Consul 

\ ire-Consul 

Consular Agent 

Consular Agent 

( 'onsul 

Coininercial .\gent . 

f 'onsular A sent 

Vice-Consul 

Acting Vice-Consul 

Acting Consular Agent 

Commercial Agent 

Consular Agent 

Acting Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent 

'^'onsu 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Acting Consvil 

Consular Agent 

Consul 

i('e-( 'onsul 

Consular Agent 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Consular Agent 

Act. Vice-Consul 

Commercial Agent 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Vice Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent 

ice-< 'onsul 

Consular Agent 

Consul 

Honorary Vice-Consul. 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 



Norway 

Venezuela 

Mexico 

LTnited States.. 
Netherlands... 
United States. 
United States. 
Switzerland.... 
United States.. 

Sweden 

Uruguay — . 

T-'ranne 

Sweden 

United States.. 

"^weden 

United States. . 
United States.. 

Spain 

Norway 

( erniany 

Brazil 

L nited States. 

Sweden 

Finland 

United States.. 

France 

J:ielsium 

Venezuela 

Brazil 

Brazil 

Portugal 

Italy 

Brazil 

United States. 

Portugal 

Brazil 

United States.. 
' nited States. 

Cuba 

United States.. 

Greece 

United States.. 

Honduras 

■ nited .States. 

Italy 

Denmark 

Unit ?d States . . 

Belgium 

Italy 

N rway 

Brazil 

Russia 

Denmark 

Norway 

United States. 
United States. 
United States.. 
United States.. 
United States. 

Italy 

Paraguay 

Greece 

Rrazil 

United States.. 

Mexico 

Cuba 



Outlook, Sask 

Montreal, Que 

Winnipeg, Man 

Regina. Sask 

Montreal, Que 

Kingston, Ont 

Prince Rupert 

Montreal, Que 

Fernie. B.C 

Richibucto, N.B 

St. John, N.B 

T'dmonton, Alta 

Regipa, Sask 

Riviere du Loup, Que 

' etaskiwin, Alta 

Kingston, Ont 

Regina, Sask 

Halifax, N.S 

Campbellton, N.B.... 

Montreal, Que 

Toronto, Ont 

Vancouver, B.C 

Toronto, Ont 

ort .Arthur, Ont 

St. Leonards, N.B.... 
North Sydney, N.S... 
Vancouver, b.C'. 



Montreal, Que. 

Gasp6, Que 

Gasp? Basin, Que 

St. John, N.B 

Gasp§, Que 

Peterborough, Ont.. , 

Paspebiac, Que 

Quebec, Que 

Louisburg, N.S 

'''harlnttetown 

St. John, N.B 

St. Stephens, N.B. . . 

Montreal, Que 

Liverpool, N.S 

Vancouver, B.C 

■^herhiooke. Que. 
Fort William, Ont... 

Calgary, Alta 

Toronto, Ont 

Edmonton, Alta 

Vancouver, B.C 

Calgary, Alta 

Toronto, Ont 

Halifax, N.S 

Halifax, N.S 

Halifax, N.S 

\ armoutli, N..S 

^'ontreal. Que 

Halifax, N.S 

Bathurst, N.B 

"amilton, Ont 

Calgary, Alta 

Montreal, Que 

Toronto, Ont 

'ontroal. Que 

Niagara Falls, Ont... 

Toronto, Ont 

Ottawa, Ont 



12 DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS 

12 GEORGE V. A. 1922 

Alphabetical List of Foreign Consuls, Vice-Consuls, Consular Agents and 
Commercial Agents, etc. — Continued. 



Name. 



Designation. 



Country. 



Residence. 



\\'hen 
Ap- 
pointed . 



Morang, G. N 

Morissette, J. B 

Moore, R. H 

Morris, M. P 

Morris, M. P 

Morris, M . P 

Mosher, R. B 

Muirhoad, D. \ 

MuUin, D 

Murphey, C. T 

MacMillan, F 

MacQuillan, J 

MacRae, K. J 

McAndrews, P. J.. . . 
McCarter, Edward B. 

McLean, H. H 

Neale, F. E 

Neale. F. E 

Neville, J 

Neville, J. A 

Newoomb, R. M 

Nicholls, F 

Nobel, O.K 

Nordbye, Dr. F. A... 

Nordheimer, A 

Okolowifz. .1 

0'nrion,.T. \V 

Owen, J. M 

Owen, W. H 

Oxley, H 

Petry, W. H 

Philpot, J 



Consul 

Commercial Agent. 

Consular Agent 

Consul 

Consul General 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

'onsular Agent 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul ; . . . 

Consul General 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul , 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Acting Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul General 

( 'onsul General 

Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent 

Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent 



Pistone, A 

Planta, A. E.... 

Points,.!. F 

Ponsot, A. H... 
Pootmans, G... 
Pootmans, G... 
Prescott, J. W.. 
Printz, C.J. P.. 
Kugo.>5ine, C. . . 



Rasmusen, Bertil M. . . 

Reat, Samuel C 

Peynori. y ^ erez. F, , 
Rif!ciardi, Cavalier G. 

RicWstal,.!. \!in 

Rochereau, de la Sa- 

bliere, C 

Rochereau, de la Sa- 

bliere, C. E 

Rogers, W. A 

Ross, T. P 

Rouillard, L 

Routh, F. C 

Rudolf, D..I 

Ryder, F. M 

Ryerson, ,Ias 

Ryznar, B 

Sanders, John O . . . 



Guatemala 

Brazil 

United States 

Panama 

ChUe 

Mexico 

United States 

United .^tates 

Belgium 

United States 

Sweden 

Ecuador 

Norway 

United States 

United States 

Argentine Republic. 

Denmark 

Norway 

Uruguay 

Argentine Republic . 

United States 

Porttigal 

Denmark 

Norway 

Netherlands 

Poland 

United States 

United States 

Cuba 

Portugal 

Demnark 

United States 



Acting Consular Agent. 
Vice-Consul 

ce-( 'onsul 

Consul General 

Acting Consular Agent. 

Vice-Consul 

Commercial Agent. . . . 

Vice-Consul 

.Vctins Consul General foi 

the Dominion of Canada 

Consid 

Consul 

f 'onsul 

Consul General 

Acting Consul 



Italy 

Norway 

United .States. 

France 

France 

Belgium 

Brazil 

Norway 



Consul . 



Ru«-i.<i 

United States. 
United States. 

Guba 

Italy 

Belgium 



Belgium . 



Consular Agent. 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Consular .\gent. 
Consul General . , 
Consular Agent . 

Covsul 

Consul 



Sanford, H. M.... 
Sancuepa, V. H.. . 
Seferovitch, A. V. 



Vice-Consul 

^^onorriry Ponsul 

Consul for the Dominion of 
Canada 



France 

United States 

Netherlands 

Hayti 

Portugal 

United States 

United States 

United States 

Czccho-Slovakia . 
United States . . . . 



United States. 
Peru 



Toronto, Ont 

Quebec, Que 

Kenora, Ont 

Vancouver, B.C 

Vancouver, B.C 

Vancouver, B.C 

Victoria, B.C 

White Horse, Y.T... 

St. John, N.B 

Samia, Ont 

Sheet Harbour, N.S. 

Vancouver, B.C 

St. John, N.B 

Pres'ott, Oit 

Montreal, Que 

St. John, N.B 

Chatham, N.B 

Chatham, N.B 

Halifax, N.S 

Halifax, N.S 

Victoria, B.C 

Toronto, Ont 

Montreal, Que 

Camrose, Alta 

Toronto, Ont 

Montreal, Que 

Halifav, N.S 

Annapolis, N.S 

Bridgewater, N.S — 

Halifax, N.S 

Quebec, Que 

Port Hawkesbury, 

N.S 

Sydney. N.S 

Nanaimo, B.C 

'""oronto, Ont 

Montreal, Que 

Regina, Sask 

Regina, Sask 

Vancouver, B.C 

Toronto, Ont 



\'nn»real. Que 

Moncton„N.B... 

Calgary, Alta 

-;t..iohn. (N.B.). 
Montreal, Que.... 
Montreal, Que — 



Toronto, Ont.. 



Toronto, Ont 

Campbellton, N.B.... 

Quebec, Que 

Quebec, Que 

Montreal, Que 

Lunenburg, N.S 

Vancouver, B.C 

Gait, Ont 

Mont-eal 

Fort William and Port 

Arthur, Ont 

Ottawa, Ont 

Montreal, Que 



Serbs, Croats, and 
Slovenes Montreal, Que. 



1898 
1904 
1918 
1906 
1892 
1914 
1915 
1921 
1908 
1920 
1882 
1898 
1914 
1920 
1918 
1908 
1918 
1909 
1913 
1908 
1914 
1906 
1920 
1916 
1902 
1919 

ig^o 

1872 
1905 
1916 
1911 

1916 
1915 
1907 
1!) 
1918 
1915 
1920 
1916 
1908 

1920 
1918 
1918 
19 
1919 
1920 

1904 

1908 
1916 
1910 
1920 
1911 
1907 
1919 
1899 
1920 

1920 
1898 
1921 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS 13 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 

Alphabetical List of Foreign Consuls, Vice-Consuls, Consular Agents and 
Commercial Agents, etc.- — Concluded. 



Name. 



Designation. 



Country. 



Residence. 



When 
Ap- 
pointed. 



Shimizu, S 

Shelton, H. I 

Schortinchuis, H. T. . 

Shotts, G. W 

Siniard, ( ieo. A 

Sinclair, N 

Skarin.K. R. T 

Smith, H.J 

Sorensen, C 

Sorensen, C 

Stickniest. S 

Spencer, W. B 

Stahlschmidt, C. B..., 

Taggart, G. R 

Tanguay, E. G 

Taylor, T.M 

Terry, W. S 

Tetreault, N 

Tewell, H. S 

Thompson, J. Enoch.. . 

Thompson, P. W 

Thorgeirsson, O. S 

Ukita, S 

Van Houten, A. C 

Van Roggen, M. A 

Vemet, H. A 

Vernon, J. 1i 

Villardson, J 

Vvse, W. (• 

Wakefield, E. A 

Walker, Sir E 

Ward, W. A 

Waterous, C. A 

Watt, G 

Wetmore, J. H 

White, H. G 

Whitman, F. C 

Winch, R. V. 



Consiil General 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Hon. Consul General. , . . 

Consular Agent 

V'ice-Con.sul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

's'ici^Consul 

Acting Consular Agent. . 

Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Consular Agent 

Vice-Consul. 

Vice-Consul 

\'ice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Hon. Con. Gen 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Consular Agent 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul. 



Woodward, G.C.. 

Yang, Hsu-Wen IConsul General 

Yeh Ko-Liang Consul 

Yeigh, F Vice-Consul 

Young, J. A Vice-Consul.... 

Zuerrer, E. R Consul 



Japan 

Uruguay 

Netherlands. . . 
United States. 

Roumania 

United States. 

Sweden 

Sweden 

Norway 

Norway 

iNorway 

Italy 

Norway 

United States. 

Paraguay 

Guatemala 

Belgium 

I'anania 

United States.. 

Panama 

Netherlands,.. 

Denmark 

Japan 

United States.. 
Netherlands... 
United States.. 
United States. 

Norway 

United States. 
United States.. 

Japan 

Denmark 

Chile 

Italy 

United States. . 

Peru 

Cuba 

Sweden 

United States.. 

China 

China 

Paraguay 

Norway 

Switzerland . . . . 



Ottawa, Ont 

.Montreal, Que 

Calgarv, Alta 

Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. 

Montreal 

Summerside, P.E.I. . . 
Edmonton, Alta ... 

Winnipeg, Man 

Port Arthur, Ont 

Fort William, Ont 

Montreal, Que 

Halifax, N.S 

Vancouver, B.C 

London, Ont 

Quebec, Que 

Vancouver, B.C 

Victoria, B.C 

Montreal, Que 

Winnipeg, Man 

Toronto, Ont 

St. Jonn, N.B 

Winnipeg, Man 

Vancouver, B.C 

Nanaimo, B.C 

Vancouver, B.C 

Cornwall , Ont 

Quebec, Que . 

Winnipeg, Man 

Ottawa, Ont 

Prince Rupert, B.C. . . 

Toronto, Ont 

Vancouver, B .C 

Brantford , Ont 

Chatham, N.B 

North Bay, Ont 

Vancouver, B.C 

Annapolis, N.S 

Vancouver, B .C 

Campbellton, N.B 

Ottawa, Ont 

Vancouver, B.C 

Toronto, Ont 

Sydney, N.S 

Toronto, Ont 



i9:o 

1921 
1921 
1906 
1919 
1907 
19 '{) 
1904 
1914 
1914 
19 
1919 
1907 
1920 
1914 
1916 
1912 
19 
1920 
1905 
1905 
1914 
1917 
1918 
1910 
1920 
19'0 
1920 
19 
1918 
1919 
1909 
1908 
I8S6 
1920 
1914 
1904 
1906 
1918 
1913 
1918 
1903 
1911 
1920 



14 



DEPARTMESr OF ESTERyAL AFFAIRS 

12 GEORGE V. A. 1922 



APPENDIX B. 

Alphabetical List of Foreign Countries represented in Canada by Consuls, 
Vice-Consuls, Consular Agents and Commercial Agents, according to the 
latest information supplied to the Department of External Affairs. 



Country. 



Place. 



Name. 



Designation. 



When 
Ap- 
pointed. 



.\rgentine Republic. 
Belgium 



Brazil. 



Chile. 



China. 



Colombia . . 
Corea* 
Costa Rica 



Cuba. 



Czecho-Slovakia . 



Halifax, N.S 

Ottawa, Ont 

Montreal, Que 

St. John, N.B 

Edmonton, Alta 

Halifax, N.S 

Montreal, Que 

Ottawa, Ont 

Ottawa. Ont 

Prince Rupert, B.C. 

Quebec, Que 

Regina, Sask 

St. John, N.B 

Toronto, Ont 



Vancouver, B.C. . 

Victoria, B.C 

Winnipeg, Man 

Gaspe, Que 

Gaspe, Que 

Halifax, N.S 

Halifax, N.S 

Halifax, N.S 

Montreal, Que. . . . 
Montreal, Que. . 

Paspebiac, Que 

Quebec, Que 

Quebec, Que 

Toronto, Ont 

Toronto, Ont 

Vancouver, B.C... 
Vancouver, B.C... 
\mherst, .\'.S. . . . 

Brantford, Ont 

Quebec, Que 

Vancouver, B.C... 

Ottawa, Ont 

Ottawa, Ont 

Vancouver, B.C... 
Quebec, Que 



Montreal, Que. 



Annapolis, N.S 

Bridgewater, N.S. 
Halifax, N.S 



Halifax, N.S.... 

Ottawa, Ont 

Ottawa, Ont 

■:t. John, X.B... 
St. John, N.B.... 
Toronto, Ont.. . . 



Toronto, Ont 

Weymouth, N. S.. 
Yarmouth, N.S... 
Montreal 



Neville, J. A 

BoUini, A. T 

Gordon, J. A 

McLean, H. H... 

Martin, H 

Curren, A. E 

Rick-iital, J. Van 

Goor, M 

>:eman, H 

CoUart, T 

Dupont, R 

Pootmans, G . . . . 

MuUin, D 

Rochereau de la Sa- 

bliere, C 

Ladner, L 

Terry, W. S 

Dubuc, A. J. H 

LeGros, P. E 

LeBoutillier, C. S... 
^'^ernandes, M. de D 

Hart, G. R 

Curren, A. E 

MUls, F. W 

T,apierre, T.orenzo. . . 
Bouillon, E. A. A. . . 

Levasseur, T 

Morissette, J. B 

Kerman, W. S 

Mason, T. J 

Emanuels, S. J 

Prescott, J. W 

Cumberford. S 

Waterous, C. A 

Frechette, O 

Morris, M. P 

Vang Hsu-Wen 

Chao Tsong Tian . . . 

Yeh Ko-Liang 

Frechette O 



Echeverria 

Velasquez, V. E. 

Whitman, F. C 

Owen, W. H 

Bravo Y Piug, Leonar- 
do 

Berdiales, M. F 

Barranco, C. A 

VIorales, Y. Ubeda A. 

Reyneri, y. Perez F.. 

Lopez, Armando 

Barranco y. Fernan- 
dez, C 

Anido, C. E 

Campbell, G. D 

Eakins, A. W...- 

Ryznar, B 



Vice-Consul 

Consul General.. 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

.\cting Coiaul . 
Consul General.. 

Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent . 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 



Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Commercial .\gent . 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Commercial Agent.. 

VHce-Consul 

''"nsular .\gent 

Vice-Consul 

\ ice-Consul 

Commercial Agent.. 

Vice-Consul 

Commercial Agent.. 

Vice-Consul 

Commercial Agent.. 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul General 

Consul General 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Consul General 



\' ice-Consul. 

Consul 

Consul 



Consul 

Chancellor 

Actg. Consul General. 

Vice-Consul 

'''onsul 

Vice-Consul 



Consul 

Vice-Consul. 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul 



1908 
1920 
1908 
1908 
1917 
1889 
19 
1913 
19 
1919 
19 
1920 
1908 

1904 
19 
1912 
1905 
1900 
1876 
19- 
189.3 
1913 
1917 

ig^o 

1918 
1902 
19(r4 
1916 
1917 
1915 
1916 
19 'I 
1908 
1885 
1892 
1913 
1915 
1918 
1909 



1921 
1904 
1905 

1920 
1919 
1919 
19 1 
19 
1920 

1918 
1918 
1913 
1907 
1920 



•Represented by Japanese Consuls. 



DEFARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS 15 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 

Alphabetical List of Foreign Countries represented by Consuls, Vice-Consuls, 
Consular Agents and Commercial Agents, etc.— Continued. 



Countrj'- 




Designation. 



When 

Ap- 
pointed. 



Denmark.. 



Ecuador. . 
Finland . . 
France. . . 



vjermany 
Greece . . . 



Guatemala. 



Hayti 

Honduras.. 



Italy. 



Japan., 



Liberia 

•Luxemburg. 
Mexico 



Netherlands.. 



Calgary, Alta 

Chatham, N.B 

Halifax, N.S 

Montreal, Que 

Quebec, Que 

Vancouver, B.C 

Winnipeg, Man 

Vancouver, B.C 

Port Arthur, Ont 

Edmonton, Alb 

Halifax, N.S 

Montreal, Que 

Quebec, Que 

Regina, Sask 

North Sydney, N.S. 

St. John, N.B 

Toronto, Ont 



Vancouver, B.C 

Winnipeg, Man 

\'ontreal, Que 

Montreal, Que 

Toronto, O t 

Montreal. Que 

Quebec, Que 

St. John, N.B 

Toronto, Ont 

Vancouver, B.C 

Winnipeg, Man 

Quebec, Que 

Toronto, Ont 

Vancouver, B.C 

Calgary, Alta 

Chatham, N.B 

Edmonton, Alb.. ...... 

Fernie, B.C 

Fort William, Ont 

Halifax. X S 

Hamilton. Ont 

Montreal. Que 

Montreal. Que 

St. John, N.B 

Sault S«e. Marie, Ont. 

Sydney, N.S 

Toronto, Ont 

Welland, Ont 

Winnipeg, Man 



Vancouver, B.C... 

Ottawa, Ont 

Toronto, Ont 

Vancouver, B.C... 
Halifax, N.S 



Halitai, N.S 

Toronto, Ont 

Toronto, Ont 

Vancouver, B.C... 
Winnipeg, Man. . . . 

Calgary, Alta 

Halifax, N. S 

Montreal, Que 

Quebec, Que 

St. John, N.B.,.. 

Toronto, Ont 

Vancouver, B.C... 
Winnipeg, Man.. . . 



Marker, C. P 

Neale.F.E 

Mathers, H. I 

Nobel, O. K 

Petry, W. H 

Ward, W. A 

Thorgeirsson, O.S... 

MacQuillan, J 

horte, K. J 

.lenvrin, P. G 

Gaboury, E 

Ponsot, A. H 

de Saint Victor, R. . 

Pootmans, G 

Lacroix, Ed 

Hatheway, F 

Rochereau de la Sa- 

bliere, C. E 

Chevalier, E 

Bourgouin, J. H 

''emptf, L 

Macheras, A 

■ iller, H.C 

Cresse, L. G.A., K.C. 
Cresse, L. G.A., K.C. 

Hatheway, W. F 

Morang, G. N 

Taylor, T.M 

BeU, C. N 

Rouillard, L 

Defries, R. L 

Maitland, R. R 

Milano, A 

Watt, G 

de Angelis, G 

Carosella, L 

Marino, E 

Spencer, W. B 

Amoroso, G 

Ricciardi Cav. G 

Como, C'apt. di V. C. 

Ledingham, W. D 

Grassi, G 

Pistone, A 

Glionna, Dr. G 

Danovara, G ... 

Barattieri di San 

Pietro, Count G 

Masi, N 

"■'himizu. S 

Walker, Sir. E 

Ukita, S 

Hechler, Henry 



Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Acting Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul General 

Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent 

Acting Consular Agent 

Consul General 

Consular Agent 

Acting Consular Agent 

Consular Agent 

Consular Agent 



Consular Agent 

Acting Consular Agent 
Acting Consular Agent 

Consul General 

Acting Consul 

Hon. Vice-Consul. . . 

Honorary Consul 

Honorary Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Consular Agent 

Consular Agent 

Consular Agent 

Acting Consular Agent 

Consular Agent 

Acting Consular Agent 

Consular Agent 

Consul General 

Commercial .\ttache.. 
Acting Consular Agent 

Consular Agent 

Acting Consular Agent 

Acting Vice-Consul 

Consular Agent 



Consular Agent 

Consular Agent 

Consul General 

Hon. Consul General.. 

Consul 

Consul 



DeWolf, J. E 

' a iola. C. M 

Mitchell, W. A 

Morris, M. P 

Heubach, Claude 

^chortinghuis, H. T . 

Black, W. A 

Heward, S. B 

Ross, T. P 

Thomson, P. W 

Nordheimer, A 

Van Roggen, M. A.. . 
Fortuyn, L. D 



Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul-General., 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 



1910 
1918 
1906 
1920 
I91I 
1909 
1914 
1898 
1920 
19 
1916 
1918 
1913 
1915 
1909 
1910 

1908 
1920 
1905 
19.1 
1919 
1919 
1913 
1913 
1898 
1896 
1916 
1896 
1920 
1913 
1913 
1919 
1886 
1920 
1917 
1912 
1919 
1918 
1919 
190 
1919 
1914 
1915 
1918 
1918 

1910 
1915 
1920 
1919 
1917 
1903 

1906 
19 .'0 
1901 
1914 
1916 
1921 
19U 
1879 
1910 
1905 
1902 
1910 
1920 



♦Represented by Consuls of the Netherlands. 



16 



DEPARTMENT OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS 

12 GEORGE V. A. 1922 



Alphabetical List of Foreign Countries represented by Consuls, Vice-Consuls, 
Consular Agents and Commercial Agents, etc.- — Continued. 



Country. 




Name. 



Designation. 



When 
Ap- 
pointed. 



Norway., 



Panama. 



Paraguay.. 

Peru 

Poland .. . . 
Portugal... 



Roumania. 
Russia 



Serb, Croats & 
venes 



Spain. 



Sweden., 



Calgary, Alta 

Campbellton, N.B. 

Camrose, Alta 

Chatham, N.B 

Chemainus, B. C... 
Fort William, Ont.. 

Halifax, N.S 

Montreal, Que 



Montreal, Que 

Nanaimo, B.C 

North Sydney, N.S. 

Outlook, Sask 

Port Arthur, Ont 

Prince Rupert, B.C.. 

Quebec, Que 

St. John, N.B 

Sydney, N.S 

Toronto, Ont 

Vancouver, B .C 

Vancouver, B.C 

Victoria, B.C 

Winnipeg, Man 

Halifax, N.S 

Montreal, Que 

Toronto, Ont 

Vancouver, B.C 

Montreal, Que 

Quebec, Que 

Toronto, Ont 

Montreal, Que 

Quebec, Que 

Vancouver, B. C 

Montreal, Que 

Winnipeg, Man 



Gaspe Basin, Que 

Halifax, N.S 

Montreal, Que 

North Sydney, N.S., 

Paspebiac, Que 

Quebec, Que 

Rimouski, Que 

St. John, N.B 

Toronto, Ont 

Hamilton, Ont 

M ontreal. Que 

Halifax, N.S 

Montreal, Que 



Slo- 



Montreal, Que., 



Halifax, N.S... 
Montreal, Que., 



Quebec, Que 

Toronto, Ont 

Calgary, Alta.... 
Chatham, N.B.. 
Dawson, Y. T... 
Edmonton, Alb. 

Halifax, N.S 

Montreal, Que.... 



Mason, J. J 

Kelly, N. A 

Nordbye, Dr. F. A. 

Neale, F. E 

Futcher, F. A 

Sorensen, C 

Mathers, H. I 

Aubert, L. C. M.... 



Stickmest, S 

Planta, A. E 

Hackett. W 

Hendericks, P. M.. . . 

Sorensen, C 

Dybhavn, John 

Dugtran, F. M 

MacRae, K.J 

Young, J. A 

Printz, C. J. P 

Stahlschmidt, C. B.. 

Hjorke. C.J 

Futcher, F. A 

Villardson, J 

Black, W. A 

Tetreault. \ 

Thompson, J. Enoch. 

Morris, M. P 

Miles, Henrj' 

Tanguay, E. G 

Yeigh, F 

^^anguesa, F. H 

Falardeau, A 

White, H. G 

Okolowicz, J 

Bukowiecki, Olszew- 
ski 

Leboutillier, C. S 

Oxley,H 

Routh, F. C 

Hackett, W 

Le Quesne, J. C 

Frechette, O 

Blair,F. N 

AUisjn, M. A 

Nicholls, F 

Coppley, G. C 

Simard, Geo. A 

Mathers, H.I 

Ragosine, C 



Seferovitch, Captain 
A.V 



Jones, W. G 

.\rregui del Campo. 

Juan B 

Frechette, O 

Thompson, J. Enoch.. 

Forslund, J. E 

Creaghan, J. A 

Firth, T. A 

Skarin, E. R. T 

Davison, J. M 

de Dardel, -"^arl Otto. 



.4.ctg. V. Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Consul General with 
jurisdiction over the 
whole of the Domin- 
nion of Canada 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Acting Vice-ConsuL. 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

.\ctine Vire-Consul.. 

Vice Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vire-( "onsul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Honorary Consul. . 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul General 



Vice-Consul 

Acting Vice-Consul — 

Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Acting Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Acting Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Commercial Consul . . . 

Hon. Consul General.. 

Consul 

.\eting Consul General 
for the Dominion of 
Canada 



Consul for the Domin- 
ion of Canada 

Vice-Consul 



Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consu 

Vice-Consul 

Acting Consul General 



1919 
1916 
1916 
1909 
1907 
1914 
1906 



1917 
19?0 
1907 
1910 
1917 
1914 
1918 
19-^0 
1914 
1911 
1908 
1907 
Ifl'O 
1907 
1920 
1910 
Ifl'O 
1905 
1906 
1902 
1914 
1903 
1921 
1916 
1914 
1919 

mo 

1895 
1916 
1911 
1910 
1898 
1908 
1913 
1903 
1906 
1920 
1919 
1917 



1920 



1918 
1894 

1919 
1898 
1900 
19 ?0 
1919 
1920 
19'0 
1906 
1919 



DEI'ARTMEyT OF EXTEliXAL AFFAIRS 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



17 



Alphabktical List of Foreign Clountries represented by Consuls, Vice-Consuls, 
Consular Assents and Commercial Agents, etc. — Continued. 



Country. 


Place. 


Name. 


Designation. 


When 

Ap- 

pomted. 


Sweden — Con 


Newcastle, N.B 


Creaghan, J. A 

Davics, J. R 


Vice-Consul 


1919 




Pictou, N.S 




IKS4 




Prince Rupert, B.C 

Quebec, Que 


Hanson, O. 




1*1 Ml 




Duggan, F. M 

Johnson, C. E 

Hutchinson, G. A 

MacMillan, F 


Vice-Consul 

Vice-C^onsul 

Vice-Consul 


IIIO 




Regina, Sask . 


1920 




Richibucto, N.B 


1911 




Sheet Harbour, N.S 

Sydney, N.S 




1882 




Angwin, J. G 


Vice-Consul 


1906 




St. John, N.B 


Edwards, M. D 

Kerr, Geo 


Vice-Consul 


1913 




Toronto, Ont 




1910 




Vancouver, B.C 


Winch, R. V 


Vice-Consul 


1906 




Victoria, B.C 


Hanson. () 

Johnson. J. P. , 
Smith, H. J 


Consul 

Vice-Consul 
Consul 






Wetaskiwin, Alta 

Winnipeg, Man 


1904 




Winnipeg, Man 


Anderson, P. B 

Huebscher, Carl P. . . . 

Zuerrer. K. R 

Erzinger, J 


Vice-Consul 


191" 


Switzerland 




Consul General 

Consul 

Consul 


1920 




Toronto, Ont 

Winnipeg, Man 


1920 
1913 




Vancouver, B.C 


Gintzburger, S 

Owen, J. M 




1913 


United States 


Annapolis, N.S. 


Consular Agent 

Consular Agent 

Consular Agent 

Consular Agent 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 


1872 




Bathurst, N.B 


Mersereau, CM 

Beebe, H. S 


1915 




Beebe Jet., Que 


1909 


• 




Barnaby, A. C 

Blackford, W 

Reat, Samuel G 

Woodward, G.C 

Rogers, W. A 


1920 




Calgary, Alta.. 
Calgary, Alta 


1920 
1918 




Campbellton, N.B 

Campbellton, N.B 

Charlottetown, P.E.I 

Cornwall, Ont 


Consul 


1918 






1916 




Livingston. C. L. . . 
Vemet, H. A 


Consul 


1920 






1920 




Cornwall, Ont 


Edwards, T. D 

Clinton, G. W 

Cox, H. . . 




1917 




Cumberland, B.C 

Edmonton, Alta 


Consular Agent 

Consular Agent 

Hon. Vice-Consul 

Consul 


1918 
1915 




Femie, B.C 

Femie, B.C 

Fort William, Ont 

Fort William, Ont 


Huntingdon, H. R 

Brand, N. F 


1898 
1918 




De Lamater, H. I . . 

Sanders, John 

Hammond, J. W 

Ryerson, James 

GunsauluH, E.N 

O'Brien, .!.W 

Merrill, E. C 


Vice-Consul 


1920 




Consul 


1920 




Consular Agent 

Consular Agent 

Consul General 


1916 




Gait, Ont... 


1899 




Halifax, N.S 

Halifax, N.S . 

Halifax, N.S 


19:>0 
1920 






1918 




Halifax, N.S 

Hamilton, Ont 


Freeman, CM 

de Olivares, Jose 

viiehel.s. C. R 

Moore, R. H 


Acting Consul 

Consul 


1920 
1914 








192(1 






Consular Agent 


1918 






Johnston, F. S. S 

dill. J. M 

Edgett, O.B 

Mack,J.M 

Taggart, G. Russell... 

LeVatte, H. C.V 

Rudolf, D.J 


1910 




Kingston, Ont. .. . 


Vice-Consul 


1920 




Leth bridge, Alta 


Consular Agent 

Consular Agent 


1919 




Liverpool, N.S 

London, Ont 

Louisburg, N.S 

Lunenburg, N.S. 


1895 
1920 




Consular Agent 

Consular Agent 

Consul 


1898 
1907 




Moncton, N.B 

Moncton, N.B 


Rasmusen, B. M 

Cummings, E. A 

Halstead. \ . 

Cochran, H. M 

McCarter, Edward B. 


1918 




Vice-Consul 

Consul General 

Vioe-Consul 

Vice-Consul 


1916 

1920 




Montreal. Que 


1920 




Montreal, Que.. . . 


1918 






Barry, J. R 




1919 




Montreal, Oue 

Nanaimo, B.C 

Newcastle, N.B 

Niagara Falls, Ont 

Niagara Falls, Ont 

North Bav, Ont 

Ocean Falls, B.C 

Ottawa. Ont 


McOsker, ,).A 

Van Houten, A. C 

Call, B. N 


Vire-f 'onsul 

Consular Agent 

Consular Agent 

Consul 


1920 
191S 
1904 




Milner, J. B 

Chapman, R. E. 

vVetniore. J. H 

Burdon, H. E 

Foster, J. G 


1916 






1917 




Vipe^( 'onsul 

Consular Agent 

Consul Oeneral 


19z0 
1920 
1903 



23971—2 



18 



DEPARTMEyr OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS 



12 GEORGE V. A. 1922 



Alphabetical List of Foreign Countries represented by Consuls, Vice-Consuls, 
Consular Agents and Commercial Agents, etc. — Continued. 



X:uiic. 



United States— ("on.. 



Uruguay. 



Venezuel.a 



Designation. 



Ottawa, Ont 

Ottawa, Ont , . . 

Peterborough, Ont 

Port Arthur, Ont , 

Port Arthur, Ont 

Port Hawkesbury, N.S 

Prescott, Ont 

Prescott, Ont 

Prince Rupert, B.C 

Prince Kiinert, B.C. . . . 

Quebec, Que 

Quebec. Que 

Quebec, Que 

Kiviere <lu l.otit) 

Riviere du Loup, Que. . . 

Regina, Sask 

Regina, Sask 

Samia, Ont 

Samia, Ont 

Sault Ste. Marie, Ont . . . 
Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. . . 

Sherbrooke, Que 

Sherbrooke, Que 

Summerside, P.E.I 

Syndey, N.S 

Sydney, N.S 

St. John, N.B 

St. John, N.B 

St. Leonards, N.B 

St. Stephen, N.B 

St. Stephen, N.B 

Toronto, Ont . 

Toronto, Ont 

Toronto 

Vancouver, B.C 

Vancouver, B.C - . 
Vancouver, B.C 

Victoria, B.C 

Victoria, B.C 

White Horse, Yukon . . 

Windsor, Ont 

V,'ind<i>-. O t 

Winnipeg, Man 

Winnipeg, Man 

Yarmouth, N.S 

Yarmouth, N.S 

Halifax, N.S 

Montreal, Que 

St. John, N.B , 

Toronto, Ont 

Viontrcal, Que 



Countrv. 



Saoford. H. M 

Vyse. \V. (■ 

Leonard, C. F 

De Lamater, H. I 

Sanders, Joiin O 

Philpot, J 

Denison, F. C 

McAndrews. Patrick J 

Wakefield, E. A 

Hill, J. .u 

Dennison, A. H 

liiroui, A. t! 

Vernon, J. B 

Briggs, L. P 

Johnson, F. C 

Johnston, J. H 

Herbert, E. E 

Diederich, H. W 

Mnrphey, C. T 

Shotts, G. W 

ColUs, E.J 

.Vlarclian.l, 11 

Adams, Ed. L 

Sinclair, N 

Freeman, CM 

Crosson, F. J 

Culver, H. S 

Carter, E. H 

Labbie, A. P 

Macdonald, W. G 

Garrett, A. B 

Martin, C. W 

Points. J. r 

Donaldson, D 

Ryder, F. M 

Kerr, I). (• 

Croshv, G.J 

Mosher, R. B 

Newcomb, R. M 

Muirhead. D. A 

Hendrick, M. J 

Hamilton. G. B 

Brittain, J. J 

Tewell, H. S 

;Vlc('unn. J. X 

Brown, R. U 

Neville.J 

•^helton. H. I 

Inches. C. F 

Estrada, J. de 

Hermandez, B 

Lameda, E. A 



Residence. 



Vice-Consul 

Vic;'-C(insiil.. . 

Consular .\gent . . 
Vice-Consul ... 

Consul 

Consular .\gent 

Consul 

\'ice-Consul 

Conajl 

V'ice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

' "onsul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Consular Agent . . . . 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consular .\-gent . . . . 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul General 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

^__'onsular .Vgent. . . 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Consul General 

Vice-Consul 

Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-< 'onsul 

Vice-Consul 

Vice-Consul 

(.'onsul 

Commercial .4gent 



When 
Ap- 
pointed. 



189S 

1920 

1910 

1920 

1920 

1916 

1915 

1920 

1918 

1920 

1919 

1920 

1920 

1920 

1919 

1917 

1916 

1919 

1920 

1906 

1918 

1920 

1919 

1907 

1911 

1917 

1910 

1919 

1915- 

1919 

1917 

1915 

1920 

1920 

1919 

1920 

1920 

1915 

1914 

1921 

1917 

19'^0 

1919 

1920 

19-20 

1915 

1913 

1921 

1920 

1914 

1920 

1920 



12 GEORGE V 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 



A. 1922 



REPORT 



OF THE 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PENITENTIARIES 



FOR THE 



FISCAL YEAR ENDED MARCH 31 



1921 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF PARLIAMENT 




OTTAWA 

F. A. ACLAND 

PRINTER TO THE KING'S MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY 

1922 



[No. 35—1922] 



12 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 A. 1922 



To General His Excellency the Right Honourable Lord Byng of Vimyj G.O.B.. 
G.C.M.G., M.V.O., Governor General and Commander-in-Chief of the Dominion 
of Canada. 

May it Please Tour Excellency: 

I have the honour to lay before Tour Excellency the Annual Rt^port of the Super- 
intendent of Penitentiaries for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1921, made by him in 
pursuance of the provisions of section 19 of the Penitentiary Act. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Tour Excellency's most obedient servant, 

R. B. BENNETT, 

Minister of Justice. 



35— IS 



12 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 A. 1922 



CONTENTS 

Page. 

Superintendent's Report . . 5-17 

Appendix A — Dominion Parole Officer's Report 18-19 

B— Warden's Reports 20-29 

" — Expenditure Statements 3(>-S3 

" - D— List of Officers 34-40 



12 GEORGE V 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 



A. 1922 



REPORT 



OF THE 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PENITENTIARIES 



FOn THE 



FISCAL YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 1921 



To the Hon. R. B. Bennett, K.C, 
Minister of Justice. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit reports and statistics regarding the administTa- 
tion of penitentiaries for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1921. 

The number of inmates in custody at the close of the fiscal year was 2,150, as 
compared -with 1,931 at the beginning of the year. The average daily population 
was 2,058. 

The following table shows the movement of population at the several peniten- 
tiaries: — 



a 
o 



« 



02 



o 
Q 



.2 
IS 

S 
.2-3 

■■£" 

n 



t. 



In custody April 1 . 1920 

Received 



From jails 

By transfer 

By forfeiture of parole . . . 
By revocation of license . 

From reformatories 

From military courts 

From asylum 

By recapture 

From court orders. ..;... 



Discharged 



By expiry of sentence 

By parole 

By deportation 

By death 

By pardon 

By transfer 

By order of court 

By return to provincial authorities. 

By escape (asylum) 

By escape 



Remaining March 31, 1921 . . . 



615 



337 

7 



520 



226 
2 



60 
110 

20 
2 
1 



66 

108 

10 

10 



3 
1 
2 

732 



555 



306 

168 
2 

■ 4 



59 

76 

11 

2 



330 



156 



83 



26 

30 

9 

2 



114 



81 



23 
16 



193 



4 
146 



34 



27 



186 



80 



38 
29 



2 
194 



1,931 



982 

36 

2 

1 



308 

374 

52 

19 

4 
36 
8 
8 
1 



2,150 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



FARM 



12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 





Acres 
cultivated 


Hay 

land 


Value of 
products 


Kingston 

St. Vincent de Paul 

Dorchester 

Manitoba 

British Columbia 


lOlJ 
140 

397 

34 

372 


931 

140 

30O 

375 

9 

85 


$ cts. 

16,350 30 
11.674 31 
19,708 72 
7,471 47 
6,161 25 
14,266 14 







HOSPITAL 





Cases treated 


Cases treated 






m 


m 


Per capita 




dispensary 


hospital 


cost 


Kingston 


4,322 


507 


$1 46 


St. Vincent de Paul 


11,398 


389 


1 73 


Dorchester 


3,694 


30 


1 95 


Manitoba 


1,302 


154 


83 


British Columbia 


595 


11 


83 




2.109 


34 


56 







NATIONALITY ( Pl.\ce of Birth) 
Briti.sh — 

Canada 

England and \Vale.s 

Ireland 

Scotland 

Other British countries 

Foreign — 

United States 

Austria-Hungary 

Russia 

Italy 

Roumania 

China 

France 

Norway and Sweden 

Other foreign countries 



160 
39 
31 
14 



199 
lOS 

s:; 

72 
2» 
21 
10 
13 
95 



1,521 



629 



2,150 



CREEDS 
Christian — 

Roman Catholic 1,052 

Anglican 356 

Methodist 207 

Presbyterian 207 

Baptist 113 

Lutheran 37 

Greek Catholic 73 

Other Christian creeds 53 

Non-Christian — 

Buddhist 12 

Hebrew "4 

Other non-Christian creeds 6 



2.098 



2,150 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF PENITENTIARIES 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 

AGE 

Under 20 years. 

20-30 years 

30-40 years 

40-50 years 

50-60 years 

Over 60 years 



SOCIAL, HABITS 

Abstainers 

Temperate 

Intemperate 



CIVIL CONDITION 



Single.. , 
Married. . 
Widowed . 



2S9 
96» 
479 
242 
130 
41 



R.^CIAL. 

White 

Coloured 

Indian (native) 

Indian (half-breeS) 

Mongolian 



2,150 


590 

1,092 

468 


2,150 


1,45G 

626 

68 


2,150 


2,019 
67 
31 

S 
25 


2,150 



EXPENDITURE, 1920-21 





Gross 
Expenditure 


Revenue 


Net 
Expenditure 


Kingston 

St. Vincent de Paul 


S cts. 

451.006 78 
318.501 81 
238,192 39 
158,176 14 
142,410 10 
,54,996 31 
257,406 91 


.S cts. 

72,995 44 

15,282 47 

23,019 08 

30,105 23 

8,070 83 

5,387 22 

7,849 07 


? cts. 

378,011 34 
303,219 34 


Dorchester 

Manitoba . . 

British Columbia 


215,173 33 
128,070 91 
134,339 27 
49,609 09 


.'Saskatchewan.. 


249,557 84 


Totals - . - 


1,620,6C0 44 


162,709 32 


1,457,981 12 



COMPAR.\TIVE STATEMENT OF NET OUTLAY 





1918-19 


1919-20 


1920-21 


Kingston 

St. Vincent de Paul 


S " cts. 

241,131 78 
181,907 86 
125,922 74 
69,197 17 
79,300 67 
78,388 79 
87,660 79 


S cts. 

283,636 96 
229,171 61 
156,950 94 
84,560 62 
82,822 96 
104,460 64 
88, 135 87 


$ cts. 

378,011 34 
303,219 34 


Dorchester 


215,173 33 


Manitoba - 

British Columbia ... ... ... 


128,070 91 
134,339 27 




49,609 09 


Saskatchewan 


249,557 84 


Totals 


863,509 80 


1,029,739 60 


1,457,981 12 


Average daily population 


1,530 


1,832 


2,058 







DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



PER CAPITA STATEMENT 



12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 





c 

i 
s 


Jl 


1 
•g 




0] 

'S 

B 

.2-3 

pa 


03 
u 

< 


03 


Staff 

Maintenance of convicts 


; cts. 

355 59 
134 89 
11 70 
98 93 
44 65 
64 46 
10 71 


i cts. 

329 26 

103 64 

8 35 

44 05 

24 16 

27 60 

1 78 


i cts. 

356 30 

125 90 

14 74 

67 46 

37 58 

106 35 

3 52 


$ cts. 

520 08 

112 79 

14 38 

123 83 

32 70 

70 61 

5 71 


$ cts. 

731 17 
129 10 
12 64 
85 02 
23 64 
106 94 
17 11 


S cts. 

1,156 97 

90 57 

56 20 

75 47 

325 30 

461 06 

129 96 


t cts. 

472 85 
149 36 




18 38 


Working expenses 


160 86 




55 32 


Land, buildings and equipment 


397 73 


Miscellaneous 


2 08 






Revenue per capita 


lU 61 


27 49 


70 40 


166 33 


63 05 


179 57 


43 13 







ACTUAL. COST 

Supplies on hand April 1, 1920 $ 305,789 00 

Gross expenditure, 1920-21 1,620,690 44 

SI, 926,479 44 

DEDUCT 

Supplies on hand March 31, 1921 $348,107 35 

Estimated value of labour on production of 

capital and revenue 75,000 00 

$423,107 35 

Net cost $1,503,372 09 

Cost per capita 730 50 

Cost per capita per diem 2 00 

COMPARATIVE SUMMARY 





1919 


1920 


1921 




$ cts. 

1,002,127 00 
863,509 00 
901,003 00 


S cts. 

1,173,073 00 

1,029,739 00 

1,067,959 00 

582 95 

1 60 


S cts. 
1,620,6C0 00 


Net expenditure 


1,457.981 00 
1,503,372 00 


Cost per capita 

Cost per capita per diem 


588 89 
1 61 


730 60 
2 00 




1,530 


1,832 


2,058 







The last days of the year 1919-20 marked the cloeiug of the Alberta penitentiary, 
and the year 1920-21 was begun with six instead of, as previously, seven institutions. 

The inmates of the Al^berta penitentiary were divided between the Saskat-chewan 
and Manitoba institutions, and the oiEce'i-s who accepted transfer were distributed 
amongst Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and Kingston. 

The warden of Alberta penitentiary was transferred to Kingston to fill the vacancy 
caused by the transfer to Ottawa, in July, 1919, of Mr. H. T?. Creighton, who for five 
years had been warden of that institution. 

The warden of Dorchester, Mr. A. B'. Pipes, resigned on March 31, 1920, and 
Mr. G. S. Malepart, warden of St. Vincent de Paul penitentiary, resigned on February 
28, 1921, the former having served over thirty and the latter over forty years. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF PENITENTIARIES 9 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 

W. J. Carroll, deputy warden of British Columbia penitentiary, who had been in 
the service over thirty-four years, re.sigmxl on November 5, 1920. D. OTLeary, who 
had been in the service of the Dominion Government thirty-eight years, resigned on 
October 31, 1920. 

L. H. Chambers, deputy warden of the Dorchester penitentiary, resigned oil 
December 1, 1920. He had over thirty-four years' service to his credit. 

Mr. W. Meighen, deputy warden of the Alberta penitentiary, was promoted to be 
warden of that institution, and after dismantling same, and shipping all material to 
other penitentiaries, was transferred to Dorchester on August 1, 1920, in like position. 

The wardenship of St. Vincent de Paul had not been filled at the close of the 
fiscal year, and J. D. Fitzgibbon, deputy warden, was acting-warden in charge. Of the 
seven above-mentioned important positions, six have been filled by promotion ; the 
seventh had not been filled at end of fiscal year. 

Warden Ponsford was received at Kingston penitentiary with open mutiny by the 
inmates, who, encouraged by a percentage of the staff, were shouting and otherwiso 
defying the authorities. The majority of the officers, however, were loyal, and after 
the removal of several of the disloyal ones affairs at that institution assumed a fairly 
normal condition. 

The action of the warden in removing these officers was made the subject of 
inquiry and an investigation was held by O. M. Biggar, K.C., Chief Electoral Officer, 
which resulted in the action of the warden.being sustained. No further serious trouble 
occurred until Octofcer, when the inmates again mutinied and for several days were 
very noisy and refused to work. 

This led to an investigation being held by the Superintendent of Penitentiaries, 
which resulted in the dismissal of six and the retirement of six officers, while two 
others guilty of very gi-ave offences were suspended and their dismissals recommended. 
The two latter protested their innocence, and a further investigation, which lasted 
some months, was held by W. F. Nickle, KjC, by direction of the Honourable the 
Minister of Justice. The report of Mr. Nickle was practically a corroboration of that 
filed by the superintendent, and the two officers were eventually dismissed, the one 
having been on suspension eleven and the other nine months. 

The matron and deputy matron of the female ward of the penitentiary were also 
retired on report of the superintendent. Laxity in aU departments, which had crept 
in during the war, when there was no inspection, was responsible for the existing very 
unsatisfactory condition. Trafficking with inmates by officers was carried on in a 
wholesale manner, and quite openly; objection by outside parties to the disciplining or 
removal of dishonest or incompetent officials added to the difficulties. The staff of the 
Kingston penitentiary is to be congratulated on having- succeeded in restoring order 
and discipline within the institution, and on having removed from the list of officers 
several who were dishonest, dangerous and a menace. Nothing out of the ordinary 
occurred at any of the other penitentiaries throughout the year. 

The population of the Dominion penitentiaries increased during the year from 
1,931 to 2,150 souls. Almost all of this increase occurred in the three eastern peni- 
tentiaries, Dorchester, St. Vincent de Paul, and Kingston. Many of the inmates are 
very young men, and most of them are graduates of some of the numerous provincial 
reformatories. 

When visiting a penitentiary recently, the superintendent personally interviewed 
197 inmates, who had asked to see him — 16-1 of these were graduates of reformatories, 
one having had eight convictions, while several had five, and fully one-third had 
served more than one term in a reformatory school, or like institution ; practically all 
of them were young men between the ages of 17 and 25 years. Most of them 
acknowledged lack of proper home training, to having spent their evenings at moving- 
picture shows, or on the street, to the carrying of revolvers, petty thieving and joy 
riding in stolen motor-cars. A number had been sent to the penitentiary for having 



10 DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

escaped from reformatories; one had escaped on five occasions. Xearly all of them 
were good looking, bright, intelligent boys, who had never been taught to take anything 
seriously; who had no respect for law and order and little regard for institutional 
rule or regulation. 

In order to make good citizens of the hundreds of young men now pouring into 
the penitentiaries, institutions should be provided for their proper segregation ..nd 
classification, together with suitable Government work in sufficient quantities to keep 
them continually and usefully employed. It would be an easy matter, in a very 
few years, to make the penitentiaries, not only self-sustaining, but to pay each 
inmate a small wage for labour satisfactorily performed. Tremendous advancement 
has been made in the last two years, but it is only a beginning of what should be done. 

Reconstruction of the old penitentiaries is being carried on, but such work is 
necessarily slow as it takes much longer to remodel the old than it does to construct 
a new building, and the remodelled one has generally to be confined to the area and 
limitations of the old. Then, too, the old prisons were not designed to reform those 
sent to them ; they were built to detain and punish criminals, and the transformation 
of such into up-to-date penal institutions is a somewhat serious and impossible 
undertaking. It is not only much more satisfactory to build a new up-to-date 
prison than remodel the old, but it is much less expensive. 

Large additions have been made to the libraries in the different penitentiaries, 
and many volumes of a technical and educational nature have been added. An 
endeavour has been made to raise the standard of all reading matter, and books to 
suit all proper tastes are provided ; thus when an educated inmate comes to the prison 
we no longer insult his intelligence by offering him literature to read which he 
despises. 

Moving-picture entertainments are now provided at intervals, and have been 
greatly appreciated. They break the monotony, and anything that prevents the 
inmate from sinking into apathy, from brooding on petty events that go to make up 
their lives in prison, and chafing against restraint is beneficial. 

Endeavours are now made to study the individual inmate. Distinctions between 
them have never been sufficiently recognized, and no real results can be obtained in 
the treatment of the offender until the distinctions between one prisoner and another 
are taken into account. 

It never does any good to treat a man as a machine, but in the ]iast there has 
been a tendency to do so under the name of discipline. 

About 60 per cent of those sent to the penitentiaries leave them without having 
suffered punishment. The more punishment inflicted on inmates in a prison the 
stronger the probability the place is poorly managed. It has also been demonstrated 
that seldom is a conversion to virtue obtained through punishment. Physical force 
can check or tempj)rarily restrain various forms of evil, but usually at the cost of 
rendering them still more intense and permanent. It is more often the force of 
persuasion, patience, gentleness and true religious influence, which can successfully 
convert those possessing wicked feelings and ugly dispositions. This is, however, a 
much more difficult task, and one for which few officers are fitted. 

It has been truthfully stated: "The soul of all human improvement is the 
improvement of the soul." Evils, whether social or moral, can be overcome only by 
good influences. Carefully selected, well-trained. God-fearing officers are therefore 
essential to the successful management and reformation of the criminal, and their 
selection and training should be a matter for serious consideration. 

The earning of remission and the hope of more speedy release from prison by 
parole are the two great incentives to good behaviour in the penitentiaries. Eemission 
is awarded for good conduct and industry, and is credited monthly to all those who 
earn it, and to those who earn it only; those whose conduct has not been good and 
who do not work diligently are not awarded remission ; not so the parole, however, as 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF PENITENTIARIES 11 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 

\ery frequently inmates are released on parole who are amongst the worst behaved 
in the prison, while it often happens that first offenders, though their conduct in 
prison has been exemplary, obtain their release by expiration of sentence only. This 
should not be, as the releasing on parole of men of bad conduct, and the refusal of 
parole to the well behiivod (causes widespread dissatisfaction amongst the inmates. 

Area parole officers and boards, as recommended in superintendent's reports of 
1919 and 1020, should be established, and inmates should be released on parole only 
on the recommendation of such boards, considered in conjunction with the report 
of the trial judge. Such methods would ensure that only those who are daily in 
contact with the inmates, and are therefore able to intelligently express an opinion 
regarding them, would have authority to recommend their release. 

There should be an honest attempt made to assist the inmates on discharge. They 
go out into the world feeling anxious and discouraged as to their fiiture. Then is the 
time they require a helping hand, moral support, and a friend. Work should be 
provided for them and an abiding interest taken in them until they become re- 
established in society. 

A man's conduct may be improved in prison, but you will not know how he will 
act when at liberty. Therefore all inmates on discharge should be guided and 
assisted so long as they require a strengthening hand. 

Unless sympathetic supervision is given them in the counuunity, which will 
assist, encourage, and strengthen them in resisting temj^tation, they will seldom 
reform. 'They must not only be prevented from returning to their former courses, 
but helped and directed into better ones. 

The Salvation Army is deserving of great praise for its efforts in this con- 
nection, as it continually assists those discharged from penitentiaries. The work 
done in this cause is excellent, well organized and continuous. 

Prices of commodities used by penitentiaries increased tremendously during the 
year, many having trebled in cost, while the naost common ones such as flour, sugar, 
rice, potatoe.s, cloth, leather, coal, cotton, etc., cost much more than was appropriated 
for their purcliase. Freight rates were also increased very considerably. It is 
submitted the various wardens have managed wonderfully well in keeping the per 
capita cost so low. 

A small ration of tobacco is now provided for each inmate who before coming to 
the penitentiary had used same. 

The unrest pervading the whole world has to a certain extent, affected the 
penitentiaries, and a type of inmate very difficult to successfully manage is now quite- 
common in the institutions. 



EECOMMENDATIONS 

A new penitentiary in the east should be constructed at once; it should be built 
on the most up-to-date plans, and can be constructed with prison labour. All plans 
and supervision to be supplied by the Penitentiary Branch; thus the cost to the 
Government would be very small as compared with prices paid contractors for 
similar work. Its erection is essential, as the three eastern penitentiaries are now 
sadly overcrowded, and the population of these institutions is still going rapidly up. 
During the past year work on the new cell wings at Kingston, St. Vincent de Paul 
and Dorchester penitentiaries has been rushed. These three wings have an aggregate 
capacity of over 600 souls. Should the increase in population continue as at present 
additional accommodation will have to be provided before the winter of 1921. 

To the new institution only those who have been convicted for the first time, 
and whose crimes have not been of a brutal or vicious nature should be sent, or 



12 DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

should the offending one be under twenty-five years of age, even though he had 
previously been found guilty of an offence, he also might be admitt-ed providing the 
nature of his crime did not warrant his exclusion. 

This class of penitentiary should have been provided many years ago; in fact 
such an institution was under construction in Canada in 18%, and the officers then 
responsible for penitentiary management were well ahead of the rest of the world in 
this needed reformation. With such an institution it will be possible to properly 
classify and segregate the inmates of Eastern Canada. 

The following recommendations made in former reports are again submitted: — 

The present system, if such it may be called, of purchasing supplies, should be 
abolished, as it has been proven to be most unsatisfactory in many ways, much of 
the material requisitioned for is not delivered until months afterwards, and com- 
plaints regarding quality are frequent. The wardens of the penitentiaries have no 
knowledge of the samples accompanying the tenders, and as no samples are pro- 
vided they have no information that the goods delivered to them are of similar 
quality to what contractor agreed to provide. Delay in payment of accounts is also 
caused by this system. 

The purchasing agent should be located in the Penitentiary Branch, where all 
matters regarding purchases could be discussed with the superintendent, structural 
engineer and accountant, and thus avoid the necessity of much corres-pondence and 
telephoning. 

The checking of invoices for payment would also be facilitated, and purchasing 
agent's present staff materially reduced as well as the rental of his office saved. 

The female portions of the penitentiaries should be outside the male inclosure. 

A criminal insane asylum should be built for the care and maintenance of the 
criminally insane. This should be centrally located and properly staffed. 

More Government work should be provided to enable lis to pay the inmates a 
fair wage and permit them to buy a stated ration of tobacco weekly. 

There should be a Canadian Prison Congress meeting annually to discuss the 
methods of dealing with the criminal in Canada. 

A canning industry should be established in connection with the penitentiaries 
to provide canned goods for the different institutions. This would not only ensure 
that proper canned fruits and vegetables could be had in sufficient quantities to meet 
the demand, but a tremendous saving to the Penitentiary Branch would result. 

Advanced methods of agriculture should be taught in all penitentiaries. 

It is reeommonded that those who have been educated in the handling of crim- 
inals and the niasagement of penitentiaries be invested with power to administer 
the affairs of same. 

The training of all discipline officere before being permitted to assume respon- 
sible duty is again suggested. The duties of these officers are partly military and 
partly police, and should be largely reformatory. That they be thorougHy trained 
before being placed in charge of inmates is recommended as an outstanding essential. 

Wardens and surgeons of penitentiaries should be afforded every opportunity 
of visiting other penitentiaries, prison congress, etc., and of studying methods of 
administration other than their own. 

Appointment of area parole officers and creation of parole boards in each peni- 
tentiary area. 

During the past two years investigations were held into incidents at the Kingston 
penitentiary by outsiders. The warden of Kingston penitentiary has e.^pressed 
himself strongly regarding this practice in his report; to what he has said I heartily 
subscribe and add, investigations such as these totally destroy the esprit de corps, 
morale and discipline of an institution, and no man other than one educated in 
prison management can successfully investig.nte the affairs of a penal institution. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF PENITENTIARIES 13 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 

At an investigation held at a penitentiary only a few years ago, the sworn testi- 
mony of every Wackleg in the institution was taken and published as trutli. The 
sworn testimony of an inmate who had been twenty-five years continuously in the 
as.vhun was also taken and published. This inmate is" still insane and the peni- 
tentiary pays for his care and maintenance in a mental disease hospital. Another 
inmate appeared before this commission, and after telling a lamentable tale of abuse 
and ill-treatment accorded him, removed his shirt and exhibited his back which 
was covered with scars, and with sobs and tears explained how his poor back had 
been lacerated by water with which he had been wet when given punishment by 
hosing. 

This story was also published broadcast throughout the Dominion — no doubt to 
impress the public with the terribly brutal treatment accorded inmates of the peni- 
tentiaries. This man was serving sentences aggregating thirty-six years, and one 
of the crimes he had been convicted of was that of having abducted a very young 
girl, a school teacher, whom he waylaid on her way home after closing her school 
for the day, and whom he forcibly detained in the woods for some days until she 
was rescued by a vigilance party who had tracked him down. The infuriated rescuers 
beat the man with limbs of trees and attempts were made to lynch him. The pits 
and marks in his back were scars resulting from the whipping he had been given 
by these men. Notwithstanding this, an endeavour was made to have the public 
believe they were the results of a hosing given him, as in all other cases, with his 
clothing on. Other such cases could be cited. 

Another committee has recommended the abolition of '^Contract labour system 
within the penitentiaries — the abolition of hosing,"' and eeveral other similar recom- 
mendations. 

Contract labour in Canadian penitentiaries was abolished over thirty years ago. 
Hosing of inmates was abolished' in 1913 — eight years ago — but it is used very freely 
as a curative measure in healing the sick and wounded soldiers in the Soldiers' Civil 
Re-establisliment hospitals throughout the Dominion to-day. 

A board to manage penitentiaries was recommended. This would indeed be a very 
retroactive step, as such a board was appointed and existed years ago, was found to 
be inoperative, disbanded, and the then secretary appointed Inspector of Peniten- 
tiaries to manage same. 

Another recommendation was: "That no officer be permitted to place his hand 
on an inmate other than to prevent escape, or to defend himself from attack." If 
such a regulation became law, the inmates employed on the farm or elsewhere, 
could at any time refuse to go to the prison, and the officers would be powerless, and 
they would have less authority over convicted criminals placed in their charge there 
— "to be maintained in custody, and kept at hard labour" — than has the policeman 
over free citizens of every walk of life. 

Discrimination against Canadians who speak either French or English, in 
favour of the foreigner, was also recommended. 

Those not familiar with penitentiary administration usually suggest methods 
seen or read of, in use at some boys' industrial school or like institution, and 
overlook the fact, when making such recommendations, that the methods of the 
kindergarten are never applied to the collegiate institute. 

In looking about for information with a view to improvements, one should 
choose the system productive of best results, not necessarily the one most advertised. 

Serious warnings have been given by many sheriffs and police officials of the 
United States regarding the laxity with which the law in that country is enforced, 
and also have warned against the maudlin sympathy wasted on those convicted of 



14 DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

In England, the severity of former years has been abandoned, and much more 
sane and humane methods now prevail. There is no criminal laxity, however, in 
either the enforcement of the law or management of those convicted of crime. It 
would appear, therefore, if good and sane results are to be obtained in Canada, we 
should study the English systems with a view to adopting what they have to offer 
by way of improvement. 

The following from the Philadelphia Public Ledger is somewhat amazing, and 
very convincing: — 

"Mention has been made of Raymond B. Eosdick's book, American Police 
Systems. Some of the figures in it almost stagger belief. For example: — 

"Boston's arrests in 1918 exceeded London's by 32,520. 

Philadelphia's arrests in 1918 exceeded London's by 20,00.'). 

Chicago's arrests in 1918 exceeded Loudon's by 61,874. 

New York's arrests in 1918 exceeded London's by 111,877. 

"In 1919 there were 5,527 automobiles stolon in Xew York. In London 
290 were stolen and in Liverpool only 10. 

"In 1918 Chicago had 22 robberies for every one robbery in London and 
14 for every one robbery in England and Wales. 

"Los Angeles in 1916 had 64 more robberies than England, Scotland and 
Wales combined. 

"Liverpool is one-third larger than Cleveland, yet Cleveland in 1919 
reported 31 times as many robberies as Liverpool. 

"Chicago is only one-third the size of London, yet had 12 times as many 
murders as London in one year. In 1917 Chicago had more murders than 
England, Scotland and Wales combined. 

"Here is a three-years' record of the United States: — 

. 191 6 8,372 murders 115 executions. 

1917 7,803 " 85 

1918 7,667 " 85 

Total 23,842 " 285 " 

"From this it would appear that only one murderer out of 80 is executed 
in America. 

"What Mr. Fosdick does not bring out is the cost of crime in dollars and 
cents. Of course, it is hard to estimate. One thing plain, however, is that 
most of the expenditure in this country is directed to dealing with crime after 
the act rather than towards removing the cause, and that a mockery of justice 
not infrequently is made through court delays, technicalities and maudlin 
sympathy. 

"Possibly, if some one figured out the percentages in the tax bill for 
police, for criminal courts, for jails and correctional institutions generally, 
together with the human waste, the business men who pay the score might give 
more attention to the crime subject in its business aspect." 

In this connection, the following is quoted from the Report of the Superinten- 
dent of Penitentiaries of 1920: — 

"Records disclose the fact that the average cost to the Government of 
securing a conviction for commission of crime is about $1,200. To this must 
be added the average cost of maintaining an inmate in the penitentiaries, 
which, together with discharge expenses and return railway fares, amounts to 
about $1,600, making the total average cost to the State about $2,800. To this 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF PENITENTIARIES 16 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 

must be added the value of loss or damage resulting from the commission of 
the crime for which the inmate was sentenced, togethnr with the value of 
support and assistance given the unfortunate wives, mothers, and children 
who, in many cases, have to be assisted while tlic wage-earner of the family 
is incarcerated; as well as the economic loss to the State of the value of his 
labour." 

A great deal is being written regarding mental defectives in the penitentiaries, 
and many people seem to consider that all the mentally defective, sooner or later, 
find their way into prisons or asylums. 

A careful study, however, of the medical records of the various nations taking 
part in the last great war, has heen made by Japanese Government officials, and the 
somewhat alarming fact revealed that, of several millions of men of one nation who 
were called up, considerably over fifty per cent were found to be mental defectives, 
judged so by specialists who examined them. It would, therefore, appear that the 
logical time to treat and cure tho.se whose mental faculties are found to be subnormal 
would be in their childhood, and every honest endeavour should be put forth to save 
them before reaching penitentiary age. 

We have talented men in the penitentiary service to-day who are fully capable 
of knowing what is essential. It is, therefore, almost incredible, and altogether 
indefensible, that the reports and recommendations of these officers, after years of 
experience, thought and study, should be ignored, and men who have no knowledge 
of penitentiaries, their requirements or administration, be brought in to draft regula- 
tions and make recommendations. 



AS THE IISTMATES SEE US 

An educated inmate who was given a very long sentence, which is now drawing 
to a close, has written an article on his experiences in and impressions of a peni- 
tentiary. The following is the closing paragraph of his manuscript: — 

" When I shall write ' Finis ' to this I know not, some day in the future, 
how near, or how far off that day is I cannot say, but it will be a day of 
gladness and rejoicing for me, but when I do leave I can honestly say, 
without fear or favour, that this prison to-day is one hundred per cent better 
than what it was when I entered it nearly nine years ago. After doubt and 
confusion have been brought certainty and order; out of darkness and shadow 
have issued sunlight and substance; out of the mud and mire of the dark ages, 
where deceit, sneakism and hyprocrisy went hand in hand, is rising manliness, 
straightforwardness and honesty. Education is taking the place of ignorance. 
Cleanliness of mind and body instead of immorality and filth. 

" Neither priest or minister is bringing about this change, but the heads of 
the penitentiaries, who by their sympathy, sincerity and understanding of those 
unfortunates who are passing through the flames, are trying to lead them on the 
right road by better conditions and tlirough the key to all reformation — 
Education." 

Another now about to be discharged states : — 

" When I came to prison I did not know anything. I was never given a 
chance, never was at school, could neither read nor write, I was not fitted for 
anything. I am going home with a fair education ; am an expert blacksmith, 
and also a good shoemaker, having been taught both these trades in the 
penitentiary. I would not take fifteen thousand dollars for what has been done 
for me while serving my sentence." 



16 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

Penitentiary statistics show that over eight}" per cent of the inmates are dis- 
charged in much better physical condition and weigh more than when received. 

Schools are now a reality in all the institutions, and excellent results are being 
attained by the qualified school teachers employed. 

The following are copies of the School and Library Reports received from 
Manitoba Penitentiary which are in every way similar to those forwarded monthly 
from all penitentiaries : — - 

MANITOBA PENITENTIARV 

Report of School Teacher for Month of 

Number of pupils receiving class-room instruction 21 

Number of pupils receiving individual instruction 101 

Total number receiving instruction 122 

Population 214 



Class-room Instructjok 

Number of pupils who were Illiterate at commencement in cla.ss. . . . 
Number of pupils who were using Primer Book 

" " " " " " First Book 

" " " " " " Second Book 

Third Book 

'• " " Fourth Book 

Total attendance in class-room for month 

Other subjects taught in class-room be.sides English (reading and 

spelling) : Writing, arithmetic, geography. 
Remarks as to changes in classes, conduct, progress, etc. — 
One pupil commenced in class August 23. 
Two pupils were discharged August 10 and August 29. 



9 
4 
2 
6 

368 



Individual Instsuction in Evening 



Subjects Taught 



No. of 
Pupils 



■^ubjeits Taught 



No. of 
PupUa 



Agriculture 

Arithmetic 

Algebra 

Accounting 

Art 

Bookkeeping 

Building construction. . 
Drawing, architectural 

" mechanical.. 

" sheet metal . . 



10 
.50 
3 

3 
2 


6 
3 



Engineering. Mechanical.. 
" Electrical... 

French 

Geometry 

Geography 

Letter writing (business) . . 

Motor Mechanics 

Music, Theory 

Physiography 

Spanish 

Shorthand 




1 
4 
3 
12 
6 

2 


6 



Some of the above are studying more than one subject. 



GENERAL REMARKS 

Those who do not yet understand English are supplied with a dictionary, 
English-French, English-Polish, etc., to enable them to study English from their own 
language. Every effort is being made to enlist their interest in something more 
than story reading, and as far as time will permit each inmate is questioned as to 
what books he may desire. Arrangements are being made accordingly in the dis- 
tribution of literature. 

(Signed) J. iS. WILSON, 

School Teacher. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF PENITENTIARIES 



17 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 

Report or Librarian for the Month or 



Number of inmates using Library 

" " reading boolcs other than fiction 

" " " wlio have been issued with school books. 
Average number of books per inmate per month 

" " of magazines per inmate per month.. 





Total 
Number 


Added to 
Library 


Total Issued 




.. — „.j. 


Class of Literature 


Current 
Month 


Previous 
Month 


any change in elaasi- 
fication or circula- 
tion 




i,6r)i 

13 
15 




1,166 

101 

20 


1,222 
65 
15 


Increase 


Decrease 
56 






36 
5 


















12 

1 

10 

10 

20 

4 

4 

37 

175 

300 

15 

60 




4 
6 
12 
20 
50 
15 
20 

15 

3,. '568 

30 

15 


3 
10 
15 
10 
40 

2 


1 




Political 




4 








3 


Encyclopoedia 




10 
10 
13 
20 
























10 

100 

3,582 

15 

5 


5 






85 






14 


Travel 




15 
10 
















Total 


2,327 




5,047 


.1,094 


120 


167 









215 
163 

198 
7.4 
16.7 



GENERAL, REMAHKS 

Picture books for distribution amongst those who are just learning to read (as an extra 
magazine) are being made from plolures cut out of magazines over a year old and in poor 
condition. 

(Signed) J. S. WILSON, 

Librarian. 



Eespectfully submitted, 



W. S. HUGHES, 

Suverintendent. 



35—2 



18 



DEPARTMENT OF JVSTICE 



12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 



APPENDIX A.— DOMINION PAROLE OFFICER'S REPORT 



W. P. Archibald, Parole Officer, reports: — ■ . 

I beg to submit the annual report on the Dominion parole system for the fiscal 
year ended March SI, 1&31. 

During the year I have been exceptionally busy visiting various institutions, 
interviewing prisoners and giving the best oversight and care I possibly could to 
prisoners released on parole. The Parole office reported on 55'S cases to the Solicitor 
General. 

History reveals that great crime waves have generally followed in tl'.i- aftermath 
of great wars. After the Grecian war large numbers of bandits preyed upon the 
people and then the suppression of crime became a most important national problem. 
Similar conditions followed the Napoleonic wars and the crime question again 
occupied the attention of the nations involved. The depredations of the " Jesse 
James " and the " Younger Brothers " followed closely after the gi-eat Civil War in 
the United States. Many of these crimes are fresh in the memory of some of our 
older Canadian people. At the present time we have the aftermath of the great 
European war, resulting in a wave of crime unparalleled in the history of the nations 
involved. 

However, the present day crime is not a parole problem. The parole statistics 
of the Dominion demonstrate that in the past twenty-two years operation of the 
system, 13,512 persons have been liberated on parole from the penitentiaries, 
provincial prisons and reformatories on their honour after having completed a 
substantial portion of their sentence in custody. Of this number only 303, or 2.2 
per cent have been known to commit another criminal offence and received what we 
term " a subsequent conviction." 12,152 paroled prisoners have completed their 
probation outside of institutions and have received a full discharge. 5S8 persons are 
now reporting with the same prospect in view. 469 licenses have been revoked for . 
non-compliance with conditions, making a total loss to the parole movement of 
772, or 5.7 per cent. 

During the past fiscal year STS prisoners have been released on parole from 
the Dominion penitentiaries and SOS from the prisons and reformatories of the 
provinces, making a total of SS3. The tabulated statement for the past fiscal year 
is as follows : — 

TABULATED STATEMENT FOR YEAR ENDED MARCH 31. 1921 



Prisoners Released 


on Parole 




Revocations 
Per cent. 


Forfeitures 
Per cent. 


Total Loss 
Per cent. 


Kingston 

St. Vincent de Paul 

Dorchester 

Manitoba 




109 

112 

76 

30 

15 

4 


3 or 2-7 
• 4 or 3-57 
lor IS 
2 or 6-66 


2 or 1-8 
2 or 1-78 
lor 1-3 
1 or 3-33 
1 or 6-6 
1 or 2500 
lor 3-4 


5 or 4-5 

6 or .i-35 
2or 2-6 
3 or 1000 
1 or C-6 


•Alberta 




1 or 25 00 


Saskatchewan 


industrial farms, etc 


29 


lor 3-4 


2 or 6-8 


Total, penitentiaries. 
Jails, reformatories. 


375 

508 


11 or 2-9 
5 or 0-9S 


9 or 2-4 
3 or 0-59 


20 or 53 
8 or 1-57 


Grand total 


883 


16 or 1-81 


12 or 1-35 


28or 317 



•The small number reported released from Alberta Penitentiary is due to the fact that the penitentiary 
was closed in the early part of the fiscal year and the prisoners were transferred to Manitoba and Saskat 
chcwan Penitentiaries. 



PAROLE OFFICER'S REPORT 19 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 

These statistics demonstrate that out of 883 persons released on parole, 10, or 1-Sl 
per cent, liavo had their liconsca revoked for non-compliance with conditions; 12 
paroled prisoners, or 1-35 per cent, have had their licenses forfeited by a subse<iuent 
conviction. The total loss for the year is 28, or 3-17 per cent, for revocations and 
forfeitures, making the lowest record of losses for any year since the inception of ^^\■^ 
Act in 1899. ' 

Last year compares favourably in losses with this year, as the total number for 
the fiscal year ended March 31, 1920,. was 34, or 4-29 per cent. The statistics for this 
year have a splendid showing, but it i^ not just to pick out a lean or good year to 
make a comparative statement of results. I rather favour taking as a criterion the 
entire figures for the twenty-two years' operation of the parole system as issued by 
the Royal Canadian Mounted Police office, where the reports are received and compiled 
and where all revocations and forfeitures are recommended. All things considered, 
the entire showing is excellent. 

The following statistics furnished by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police office 
tally with the figures kept in the Parole office and are found correct: — 

From 1899 to March 31, 1921 — 

Released on parole from penitentiaries 6,269 

Released on parole from prisons, jaiis and reformatories . . . . 7,243 

13,512 

Licenses revoked 469 

Licenses forfeited 303 

Sentences completed on parole 12,152 

Sentencrs not yet completed 588 

13,512 

An effort has been made in one or two communities to attach a portion of the 
responsibility of the " crime wave " to the men released on parole. Nothing is revealed 
to demonstrate this statement. In fact, wherever a paroled prisoner is in trouble and 
an offence proven against him in a court of competent jurisdiction his license auto- 
matically is forfeited and he returns to prison, not only to serve an added sentence but 
to complete the time he has earned on probation. I am sure the figures given, which 
present the facts of the situation, speak in words of eloquence and provide inspiration 
for those who believe in the possibility of amendment from the criminal strata of 
luiman life . 

The ability and strength of character found even among those supposedly lost to 
society when given a chance on their honour, especially those who respond so magnifi- 
cently on probation, demonstrate to an uiibelieving person the utility of the parole 
system, although there are those who object to a man ever having even a chance to 
make good after a fall. The criminal ranks of to-day are not being recruited from 
our prisons hut they are the by-product of our social life and social conditions. Every 
community is producing just the number of criminals they deserve to have. The lack 
of home training, parental respect, the control of the home institution, the loose morale 
of our communities in not applying correctional methods when the delinquent is still 
plastic in character, the lack of religious education, the free access of boys and girls 
of a tender age to movie shows where tragedies, thefts and even murder are invariably 
depicted in glowing scenes, are all educating our youth in the wrong way and giving- 
them false conceptions of real life. If present conditions continue, we will in Canada 
produce a crop of criminals for the coming generations to deal with that will take 
centuries to extinguish the flame of vicious living. 

I feel very grateful that in past years I have had the co-operation of the various 
bodies engaged in prison reform work, especially those who are assisting paroled men 
into situations by providing the bridge to help cross the gulf made by the anti-social 
act whereby he is received and welcomed and an honest opportunit,y afforded him to 
help bury the past and live in a brighter hope for the future. The co-operation of so 
many societies and individuals greatly assists in reconstructive work, especially in the 
final rehabilitation of our anti-social subjects. 
38— as 



20 DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

12 GEORGE V, m. 1922 



APPENDIX B— WARDENS' REPORTS 

KINGSTON. 

J. C. Ponsford, Wardin, reports: — 

I have the honour to submit the annual report of the Kingston penitentiary for 
the fiscal year ended March 31, 1921, with crime statistics showing the movements of 
inmates during the year, from which it will be seen that the inmate population has 
increased 117, made up as follows: — 

On March 31, 1920—593 males, 32 females. 
On March 31, 1921—707 males, 25 females. 

The male population increased 121 and the female decreased seven. 

You will note by the statistics that there were three escapes during the year, two 
from the penitentiary and one from Rockwood asylum, to which institution inmate 
Cole had been transferred. The three inmate© who escaped were : Cole, G-456 ; Hilton, 
H-71; Griggs, G-692. Hilton and Cole were recaptured in Detroit, Michigan, and 
Griggs will be returned at the expiration of his sentence at Elmira, N.Y., where he is 
at present doing a five-year term for " auto theft," for which he was arrested about a 
month after his escape. 

During the year there were: — 

110 paroles 

90 discharges by expiration of sentence 
20 deportations 

1 pardon 

2 deaths (natural causes) 

2 returned to Provincial authorities. 

There are at the present time 17 inmates confined in the different asyluma of the 
province, 10 of whom are serving life sentences. 

Of the 732 inmates confined, the youngest is 17 years and the oldest 71, and 608 
are under 40 years of age. 

I am very pleased to be able to report that the general health of the inmates has 
been good, and the sanitary conditions are excllent. Improvement in the sanitation 
of the shops is very marked, as is also the cleanliness, owing to the fact that they 
have been all renovated and painted. 

The hospital has been very much improved during the year by installing the 
latest and most modern equipment, also the removal of the kitchen from the hospital, 
and the installation of an operating room fully equipped, a sterilizing room with the 
necessary sterilizers, linoleum laid on the floors, fly-screens on the windows, and the 
whole interior cleaned and repainted. All food for the hospital is now prepared by 
the prison steward from a dietary sheet provided by the surgeon. This is a grreat 
improvement on the former system of having the kitchen in the hospital. All of 
the personnel of the hospital staff was changed during the early part of the fiscal 
year; this made a great improvement. The supply of drinking water for the inmates 
is of the best, the same being obtained from a deep well in the prison yard. 

Progress has been made in the construction of the new boiler-house, laundry and 
coal vault This work has ru)t made as rapid progress as I would have desired owing 
to the fact that the old gas-house and other buildings had to be taken down, and at 



WARDEN'S REPORTS 21 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 

the same time provision made to pvoteot the sewage pumping plant. This work is 
well under way, and it is hoped to have it completed during ri)22. 

The new North Wing, commenced in 1919, has been completed. This has added 
168 up-to-date standard cells to prison accommodation. The question of housing 
has therefore been relieved for the incoming year, but if the population continues to 
increase at the rate it has for the past two years, new cell accommodation will be 
required. 

About 150 feet of new stone wharf was built at the south end during the year, 
and the old stone bastion or tower-house at the northwest corner of the prison 
enclosure was torn down and a new one built of the umbrella type. The gothic-shaped 
coping, for about 80 feet to the right and left of the new tower-house, was taken off 
and a flat cement coping put on with iron pipe railing. This has made a wonderful 
improvement, as the officer doing duty at that station is given a full range of vision 
over the entire north end of the yard. The last remaining stone bastion or tower at 
the northeast corner will bo removed during the present year and one identical in 
pattern to that at the northwest corner will be built in its place. When that is done, 
all four towers on the wall will be similar. 

The farm instructor resigned at the end of the last fiscal year, and' Mr. Purdy, 
the storekeeper, being a Guelph Agricultural graduate, was asked to take charge of 
the farm temporarily. This he did and was later transferred to the position of 
industrial guard farm instructor. Under his direction and management, the farm 
gave the best results attained in several years past. I regret very much that Mr. 
Purdy, like his predecessor, resigned at the end of the fiscal year to accept a more 
lucrative position. 

A large amount of work has been done for the Post OflBce Department by our 
Bag Department. During the year just closed, 194,904 mail bags were repaired and 
143,172 new ones made, which produced a revenue of $54,021.43. Besides the work 
mentioned above, we handled 232,417 bags, which were inspected, classified and 
reshipped. Included in the above new bags are 3,515 made for the Chief Electoral 
Officer, for whom there was also made in the Tin Shop, 1,000 ballot boxes. 

The Tailor Department during the year, made for the Department of Indian 
Affairs 155 triennial suits; Department of Soldiers' Civil Ee-establishment, 40 suits; 
for officers' custom work, 27 suits, 24 coats, 9 pairs of trousers and 2 ve.«ts; and 
for our own officers, 197 suits, 62 overcoats, 43 caps, as well as all the wool and duck 
clothing and caps worn by the inmates. 

The blaefemith shop has had a very busy year in completing the equipment for 
the new North Wing, and making all of the necessary equipment required for the 
other penitentiaries in barriers, cell gates and locking bar system. 

Sixty odd men were employed during the entire year in the stone shed, and 
most of these inmates are turned out expert stonecutters, capable of earning from 
$10 to $12 per day. 

The carpenter shop has also been busily engaged on construction work for the 
penitentiary. Only six carpenters were in this department when I took charge. 
This number has now been largely augmented, and many inmates are being taught 
this useful and profitable occupation. 

Tin and paint shojis have also been employed steadily on institutional work. 
The staff of the Printing Department has been doubled and a large addition made to 
the machinery, which has been continually employed on work for the penitentiaries 
generally. 

A wonderful improvement in the Kitchen Department has been made, and the 
inmates are now given a very varied diet, which is well cooked and served. The 
bread throughout the year has been excellent. 



22 DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

12 GEORGE V, A, 1922 

The Engineers' Department ha3 given entire satisfaction, and preparations iu-& 
being made for the discontinuance of the old steam power plant and substitution 
therefor of the Hydro-Electric. All this work is being done by officers of the peni- 
tentiary; no outside labour has been used. 

I was transferred to the wardenship of this institution on April 27, 1920, coming 
from Edmonton Penitentiary, of which institution I Lad been in charge for six 
years. I found conditions on taking over to be most unsatisfactory. The discipline 
and sanitation of every department in the institution were at a very low ebb. This 
statement applies even to the Warden's office, which looked as though it had not been 
renovated in years, and was in a dirty, untidy condition. 

The Aecoimtant's office, and the Stores Department were in very good shape. 
In all of the others there appeared to be a great laxity of co-ordination and they were 
very indifferently managed. 

Trafficking by officers with inmates and their friends was carried on to an 
alarming extent. 

In November an investigation was held by the superintendent within the peni- 
tentiary, assisted by Detective Inspector Walter Duncan, the result of whieli was the 
dismissal of seven, the retirement of seven and the suspension of two officers. This 
cleared the air; had a splendid effect and materially assisted the warden in his 
efforts in restoring the Kingston penitentiary to the high standard of efficiency it was 
at one time noted for. 

The matron and assistant matron of the Female Prison were also removed on 
the report of the superintendent; they being permitted to resign. The improvenoent* 
in the Female Department of the penitentiary have been very uiarlced, as under 
the old management affairs in that department had not been at all satisfactorily 
managed. < 

In conclusion I would make some recommendations, which I trust may appe^il 
to you as reasonable and necessarj' : — 

First. — It is recommended that this Penitentiary be reuioved from its present 
position to a suitable location in an open district with necessary railway, water and 
l)uilding facilities. In such a locality a reserve at least one mile square should be 
purchased. This penitentiary is very badly situated; it is on a narrow strip of land 
extending from the shore of lake Ontario northward for a distance of one and a 
quarter miles, through which five public highways pass, they being the Cataraqui 
Toad, Bath road, Jolmston, Union and King streets, while Palace street, running, 
north and south, passes through the penitentiary reserve about half its length, and 
then forms the eastern boundary the remainder of the way. This is one of the 
favouiite automobile routes, and over it must pass all the inmates being employed on 
the farms. In the small space situate between King street and the water front, is 
located the prison. The enclosure contains 13 acres, included in wliieh are the 
executive buildings, workshops, hospital and female ward, and in which on the evening 
of March 31, 1921, 732 inmates were confined. It is impossible to avoid congested 
conditions, both with regard to population and workshops. 

King street runs immediately in front of our main gate. On this street 
there is a great deal of traffic, as well as a direct line to Portsmouth of the Kingston 
and Portsmouth Railway Company, which has a ten minutes' service. Besides the 
street ears, himdreds of automobiles and other vehicles, to say nothing of a continual 
stream of pedestrians pass. This is most undesirable, as all gangs working outside, 
such as on the farms, quarry, etc., must pass up and down the road above referred to. 
It is not only undesirable from a disciplinary standpoint, but it is most dangerous 
as well. 

There is another aspect which must be seriously considered ; that is the great 
increase in convict population, which at the present rate will reach. I feel sure, 900 



WARDEN'S REPORTS 23 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 

souls or moie before the eud of the fiscal year 1922. The moving of this peniten- 
tiary, or the construction of an additional one, should therefore be undertaken and 
proceeded with at a very early date. 

Second. — -The Female Prison should be removed from out the walls, and I would 
recommend same be placed under an entirely separate management from that of the 
Male Penitentiary, and made to accommodate from 150 to 250 inmates. 

Third. — I would recommend that the warden be given authority to dismiss, or dis- 
pense with' the services of any officer on his staff who, in his opinion, is not rendering 
fair and reasonable service. I am sure you must agree with me that this is a proper 
suggestion, in view of the fact that the warden is held responsible for the conduct and 
management of the institution. It would also prevent outside interference with the 
control ami disciplining of the officers on the staff, and would eliminate such obeel ion- 
able x>roceedings as took place here during the present fiscal year, viz: — investigations 
by Colonel O. M. Biggar and Mr. W. F, Nickle, both of whom after very long and 
careful inquiries and the taking of evidence under oath, were forced to confirm the 
actions of the superintendent and warden. The demoralizing effect of an outsider being 
brought into an institution such as a penitentiary to investigate the conduct of the 
warden for having siispended or dismissed one of his officers, can readily be understood, 
and is very far reaching. 

When it became known to officers and inmates that investigations were to be 
held by outsiders, insubordination by the inmates, who no doubt were urged by a 
number of officers, became apparent, and T have no hesitation in saying that the 
strike which took place in this institution on October 15, was staged in an endeavour 
to influence Colonel Biggar in his investigation, as it took place just a day or two 
before he opened same, as the date of his coming was announced in the newspapers 
and well known to both officers and inmates. When an investigation must be held 
I am strongly of the opinion that the Superintendent of Penitentiaries is the only 
and proper person to hold same. 

Fourth. — I would recommend that at least once a year the wardens of all the 
penitentiaries meet the superintendent and inspectors to discuss matters affecting the 
ad'ministration of the institutions. This meeting should be held during the winter 
when the wardens could best be spared from their various posts. Only great benefit 
could result from such meetings. 

Fifth. — I am of the opinion that inmate populations 'should be divided so that 
not more than 600 souls should be confined in one institution. At this institution 
we have no shop accommodation for over that number, and no room within the 
walls to properly add to said accommodation. 

Sixth. — We have in this penitentiary incorrigibles, as well as female and other 
inmates transferred from the various penitentiaries. Upon their discharge all 
e.xpensee in connection with same, including railway fare, are charged against thi^ 
institution, and thereby considerably increases the per capita cost of same. May I 
respectfully suggest that a portion of this expense should be boi'ne by the insti- 
tution from whence they came. 

Herewith I send you necessary statements for pulilication of report. 

1 wish to express my gratitude to the superintendent and inspectors for their 
assistance and courtesies rendered during the year, the same was unstinted and 
cheerfully given. This is particularly applicable to the superintendent, who has 
been untiring in his efforts to assist in straightening vp all affairs here. 

The majority of my staff have been faithful, and have given me loyal and hearty 
support, for ffhieh I am truly grateful. 



24 DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



ST. VINCENT DE PAUL 



12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 



J. D. Fitzgtbion, Acting-Warden, reports: — 

I have the honour to transmit herewith' the annual report for the fiscal year 
ended March 31, 1921. 

On the 31st of December, 1920, I was directed by the superintendent to take 
charge of this penitentiary pending the appointment of a warden vice Mr. G. S. 
Malepart, superannuated. 

In transmitting this report I desire to tender my sincere thanks to the Super- 
intendent of Penitentiaries for the prompt manner in which he dealt with' all matters 
it was my duty, as acting-warden, to lay before him. 



DOElCHBSTER 

TT. Meighen, Warden, reports: — 

I beg to submit the following annual report for the fiscal year ended March 31, 
1921, together with the following reports: — 

(1) Statistical 

(2) Farm Report 

(3) Surgeon's Report 

(4) Librarian's Report 

(5) School Teacher's Report 

(6) Matron's Report 

At the closing of the prison, March 31, 1920, there were 306 inmates. We received 
during the year 174 and discharged, by expiration of sentence, 59 ; by parole, 7G ; by 
deportation, 11 ; by transfer, 1 ; by order of the court quashing conviction, 1 ; and by 
death, 2; leaving us with 330 at the closing of the prison, March 31, 1921, and with" 
an average attendance for the year of 327. 

As regards the work performed during the year, I prefer to speak only of what 
has been done since I assumed control on August 16 last. Evidently the whole 
institution had been deteriorating in many ways for some years back. The construc- 
tion of a new cell wing had been dragging for some three or four years and was 
practically at a standstill.' The roofs of all the shops, the piggery and the implement 
shed, were leaking. Owing to non-delivery of cement we were unable to accomplish 
m.uch at the new wing, but we did everything possible. We reshingled the implement 
shed; the piggery, and by a covering of elastigum made the shop roof^ water-tight. 

The old hospital which was and still is out of date, has been cleaned up and 
painted and looks as well as it is possible to make it, but a new modern hospital will 
have to be built and same cannot be done too soon. I endeavoured during the winter 
to get everything in shape for all building operations to be done this summer. Our 
farm gang cut some 1,700 spruce logs on our own farm from which we had sawn over 
50,000 feet of lumber, and some 250 fence posts; these have been turned and shaped 
in our carpenter shop during the winter season. 

During the months of November and December our mail bag department provided 
work for upwards of one hundred men, and this department showed a substantial profit 
for the year. 

Our present school accommodation is very inadequate and I hope to have better 
accommodation provided in the near future. 

We will also have to enlarge our present chapel or build another as our present 
one is filled to over-flowing every Sunday, and if our population continues to increase. 



WARDEN'S REPORTS 25 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 

we will be unable to have all attend church services at one time. The chaplains report 
the discipline as good during divine service. 

The farm operations on the whole were very good, but I felt the quality of cattle 
being raised was not of the standard that it is profitable to keep; I have therefore 
purchased a number of well-bred cows with a view of raising an improved quality of 
stock such as will he both profitable and a credit to the institution. 

I am pleased to say that the majority of the staff are good reliable officers — several 
of them have, I believe, conscientiously performed their duties for upwards of twenty 
years. 

The surgeon reports the ventilation and sanitary conditions as satisfactory. 

I am pleased to report that the discipline of the institution on the whole has been 
well maintained, and I might also state that the worst class we have to deal with are 
mostly young boys who have served terms in so-called industrial homes and reforma- 
tories for boys. 

In conclusion I wish to thank the superintendent, inspectors, as well as tho 
structural engineer for the support and encouragement they have given me since I 
took charge of the institution. 



MANITOBA , 

TF. R. Graliame, Warden, reports: — 

The population on March 31, 1920, was 156, including three at asylum, 110 were 
received during the year and 73 discharged, leaving on March 31, 1921, a population 
of 193. The conduct and industry of the inmates has been good. 

The mail bag repair shop has heen a great source of revenue, showing a total of 
$15,C31.C8 for the year. 

School has been held each week day and excellent progress has been made, and 
with the advent of a school teacher and librarian who will now devote his whole time 
to tliis work, much more will be accomplished. The large list of magazines and 
periodicals is greatly appreciated. 

The inmates were employed during the year in the various workshops. 

A new boiler-house was built at the south end of the workshops and two boilers, 
received from Edmonton penitentiary, were installed. A coal vault to hold six hun- 
dred tons of coal was built adjoining the boiler-house. The teams unload on top of 
the coal vault, which saves a lot of work. Also, a duct was built from the workshops 
to the prison for the steam pipes, this will form the main duct of the east wing when 
completed. A new ice-house is under way but was not completed before winter came 
on. It is now near to completion. 

I am glad to say that we are allowed to keep cattle again; this I consider a 
necessary adjunct to farming operations. 

The chaplains report the conduct of the inmates good while attending divine 
worship. 

The moving-picture entertainment in the holiday season was much enjoyed and 
appreciated by the inmates. 

The change in our dietary which our steward has under way is appreciated by 
the inmates. 

The health of the inmates has been good. Two deaths occurred during the year, 
both of which were duly reported. 

No escapes have occurred during the year, and discipline has been well maintained. 

Before closing, I take the opportunity of thanking the superintendent and his 
staff for the courteous treatment and assistance received at all times. 



26 DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 
BKITISH COLU.\rBIA 

John C. Brown, Warden^ reports: — 

There -were 114 prisoners in custody when tlie year began, and 146 when it closed. 

The year saw the end of our eight-year immunity from escapes. In June, 
two short-term prisoners, at work on the building of the Glen Brook sewer, slipped 
away, and one of them has so far made good his escape, the other being recovered. 
Lack of vigilance made the escape possible: carelessness allowed one to get ofF when 
the other was retaken. In July, two life prisoners, who were in hospital, succeeded 
in unlocking their cell doors and, cutting one window bar, let themselves down by 
ropes made from twisted strips of their bed linen. One of them was retaken after 
seven months; the other is stiU at large. The officers responsible were retired from 
the service or fined. 

Four members of the staff who had each been in the service over thirty years 
retired during the year, under the provisions of the Acts for retirement and super- 
annuation allowances. 

Only one accident occurred during the year. A Japanese inmate, slipping on 
a wet plank, broke his wrist. He has completely recovered. One prisoner, who had 
been fatally wounded before his admission — he was carried into prison on a stretcher 
— died a few days after being received. 

Work, other than the routine work of the shops and occasional repairs, has 
been chiefly the continuation tif work in hand when the year b^an. Plastering 
cells in the East Wing was completed — 130 cells, 3,500 square yards of plaster. 
Improvement of water system in East Wing completed- — 75 cells. Kitchen closets 
were moved and a new one put in — not quite completed at close of year. Five hundred 
feet of Glen Brook sewer completed, one himdred feet of trench excavated, and about 
one hundred and fifty feet of temporary canal constructed. The work of removing 
the hill which obstructed our view of the entrance road was completed, abt>ut 5,000 
cubic yards of earth being thrown into the ravine, where a little grading of the dumped 
material will change what was an unsightly gulch into a flat of some four and one- 
half acres, level with the street. Work on the central hall has progressed so far that 
its completion may be expected early in the current year. Two of the concrete girders 
which support the roof have a span of 63 f.:et, and the other two, of 60 feet. The fact 
that they were put in with convict labour without a hitch, and are entirely satisfac- 
tory, shows the care and thoroughness with which the chief trade instructor does 
his work. Among minor works were the getting in and "manufacturing" of sixty 
cords of wood; the renewal of some thousand feet of boundary fence, necessitating 
the making and replacing of one hundred and twenty 16-foot posts; and the conver- 
sion of one of the temporary cell houses into a garage. The change in the deputy 
wardenship was taken advantage of to renovate that officer's quarters. 

The conduct of the prisoners, was, on the whole, good. About half a dozen havt 
spent a good deal of time in isolation and perhaps another dozen have been up before 
me — some of them more than once — for minor offences; but a large majority give no 
trouble. 

A concert given by an orchestra under the leadership of the prison organist, and 
a "movie" show by two gentlemen from the Vancouver Y.M.C.A., were greatl.> 
enjoyed and highly appreciated by the inmates. 

The Protestant chaplain would like to see an advance in the cautious and 
tentative policy of the past few years in the line of providing occasional entertain- 
ment for the prisoners. 

The Roman Catholic chaplain suggests a second service during the week. 

Both are well pleased with the geiieriil conduct of the prisoners under tlieii 
charge. 



WARDEN'S REPORTS 27 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 

The M-PcHcal Department was under a tiiiipornry surgeon for over two months. 
The present surgeon was not appointed until the last months of the fiseal year; 
consequently, the medical report is meagre. Tlio per capita cost of drugs for the year 
was 83 cents. 

The new surgeon is proving very satisfuc-tory so far. lie arrives about the same 
hour every morning and finds it necessary to make his visits from twice to four times 
as long as the average visits of our late surgeon. His monthly reports are sensible 
documents, and he shows carefulness in the matter of avoiding any interference with 
discipline, which can be avoided without neglect of the patient. 

The deficit in the farm returns is hnrdly to be wondered at; with our small 
extent of poor side hill soil, it would be a difficult matter to make a farm pay under 
the best conditions. 

The present fnrnier is a practical man, who evidently knows his work and intends 
to do it as well as possible. 

The big Kelly truck is useful in hauling from town and wharf, and will be more 
efficient when certain repairs or betterments have been completed. The smaller Eeo 
truck is doing more work than one team could do and doing it well. 

The school has been a distinct success, so far as one can judge at present. The 
deputy warden is quite satisfied that it decidedly promotes good conduct, particularly 
among the younger inmates. The schoolmaster also takes a cultured man's interest 
in the library and is working every day toward getting it into good order, and making 
it as useful as possible. 

Statistical and other reports are enclosed. 



ALBERTA 

<!ilbert Smith, Acting Warden, reports: — 

As the last one in charge of the Alberta Penitentiary, I have to submit a report 
for the fiscal year 19'20-21. I assumed charge on July 30, 1020, Warden Meighen 
leaving that day for Dorehestei-, where he had been transferred as warden. I 
continued in charge until the closing of the institution by the transfer of the 
remaining inmates to Stony Mountain on August 25, in that connection acting as 
transfer officer. 

There were 34 inmates at Edmonton on the 1st of April. 19'20, and seven were 
received from jails in the months of April and May. Of these 41 men, four were 
transferred to Manitoba in April, one escaped in May, the sentences of six expired, 
two were deported, five paroled and the remaining 23, as above stated, were trans- 
ferred to Stony Mountain on the 25th of August. This transfer was conducted 
without expense except the railway fares of the inmates, as officers who were being 
transferred to Stony Mountain and Kingston penitentiaries were utilized on the 
journey, and the services of a guard who was bringing an insane inmate from 
Stony Mountain to Ponoko assisted us on the way east. The transfer was uneventful 
and was carried out with all possible consideration for the comfort of the men, 
consistent with their safe custody while on the train. 

Previous to the removal of the inmates all that was possible of the supplies, 
fittings and equipment of the Institution was shipped to other penitentiaries. The 
heating boilers were sent to Manitoba Penitentiary and saved the purchase of new 
boilers for that institution, and the boundary fence which contained seventy thousand 
feet of lumber was shipped to Saskatchewan Penitentiary. A few barriers and 
smaller fittings in use up to the end were removed by hired labour after the inmates 
had been transferred. 



28 DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

The coal mine on the reserve was worked till the middle of August, and the mine 
instructor left in charge to see that the puuij) was kept working and the mine pro- 
tected from damage by flooding. 

The disposal of the reserve, consisting of about 130 acres, is in the hands of the 
superintendent for settlement, but nothing is being lost by waiting as real estate in 
Edmonton at present is at low ebb. This condition may improve in the course of a 
year or two. 



SASKATCHEWAN 

W. J. Macleod, Warden, reports: — 

Our population on March SI, 1920, was 186. During tlie past year we received 
80,' and discharged 38 by expiration of sentence, 2& by parole, two females by transfer 
to Kingston, two males by death and one by order of the court, leaving us with a 
population of 19-1 at the end of the year. This includes five in the Provincial 
Hospital for the Insane. 

The following very necessary w-ork was done during the year : — 

Concrete work was started on new East Cell Block and Hospital extension on 
May 3, and building was roofed in by September 30. Approximate size of building 
is 236 feet by 60 feet. Work completed inside this building during the winter is as 
follows: — All south side four galleries of cells and corridor ceiling poured with 
concrete and work started on first gallery of cells on north side. Three galleries 
on south side have cell barriers on each cell, locking apparatus in place, and railings 
along galleries completed with work progressing on the fourth gallery. In hospital, 
concrete work completed on all three floors. The first floor is all plastered and if 
barriers were made and in place it could be used at any time. Finishing work is 
progressing on the other two floors. 

Two wells were sunk during the early summer months and tli^y have given us 
the water required for all purposes. 

Owing to shortage of water during first part of sunmier, work did not start in 
brickyard until July, and we made one hundred and sixty-eight thousand (163,000) 
bricks, all of good quality. 

Excavation for JSIorth Wing was started and over two-thirds done when stopped 
by frost. General repairs were taken care of by the various departments. 

We had 457 acres under cultivation on our farm, but owing to the very dry 
season we did not get a half crop. 

During the winter months we cut and hauled 251 cords of wood, and 1,100 fence 
posts, and drew 1,032 cubic yards of gravel, and also cut and stored ice enough for 
our needs during the summer montlis. We graded and made a road 66 feet wide 
across our two new river lots and a start was made on fencing in this new property. 

We held school during each working day of the year, and the progress made by 
those attending was excellent. 

The spiritual welfare of the inmates was well looked after by our chaplains. 
Both chaplains report that they were well satisfied with the appreciation and 
attentiveness of the inmates during divine service. 

The library, in which we have hundreds of good books, was well patronized. We 
also take a number of the leading magazines and our inmates enjoy reading them 
very much. A number of our inmates have been given permission to take up any 
special branch of study and allowed to get books to assist them, and are in this way 
fitting themselves to lead a better and more useful life upon their release. 

The surgeon reports two deaths during the year, one from apoplexy and the other 
from spinal meningitis ; also one serious ease of appendicitis, which necessitated an 



WARDEN'S REPORTS 29 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 

operation from wliich the patient iikkIi- :t siili'udid recovery; also a number of other 
'serious eases of illness during the year, and at the present time there are throe cases 
of insanity, one case of very advanced tuberculosis and one of senile decay. Steps 
have been taken to remove the insane inmates to hospitals for the insane. The 
surgeon also reports ventilation and sanitary conditions as excellent. 

As we now have a number of trucks, tractors and other gasolene machines, I 
think we should open up a gasolene engine repair department with a good goi^olene 
engine mechanic in charge. Gasolene engine repairing is a very live industry 
throughout the country and a number of our inmates are anxious to be given 
instructions in this kind of work, as a good mechanic in this line of work can secure 
employment very easily at any season of the year. 

I am glad to report that the conduct of the inmates on the whole was very good. 

Inspector Smith paid us a visit during the year and we were glad to have him 
with us so as to be able to discuss prison matters. Visits of this kind are very 
helpful. I am of the opinion that our wardens should be sent each year to visit other 
institutions, so that they will not get into a rut in the management of the peni- 
tentiaries, but be broadened by association with other prison men and seeing other 
institutions. 



30 DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

APPENDIX C— EXPENDITURE 

KINGSTON 
Staff- 
Salaries and retiring allowances $151,061 30 

Uniforms and mess 10,601 74 

Bonuses 41,941 33 

Retroactive salary 27,819 34 

$231,423 71 

Maintenance of inmates — 

Rations f 48.286 67 

Clothing and hospital 35,398 20 

83,684 87 

Discharge expenses — 

Freedom suits and allowances $ 8,702 52 

Transfer and interment 27 39 

8,729 91 

Working expenses — • 

Heat, light and water $ 33,251 48 

Maintenance of buildings and machinery.. .. 18,204 34 

Chapels, schools and library 637 99 

OfBce expenses 4,267 31 

56,361 12 

Industries — 

Farm $ 6,365 32 

Trade shops 15,377 83 

21.7'.:! 15 

Prison equipment — r 

Machinery % 1.706 03 

Furnishings 6,252 10 

Utensils and vehicles 4,541 10 

Land, buildings and walls 29,560 41 

. 42,059 64 

Miscellaneous — 

Advertising and travel $ l.lSl 98 

Special 5,822 40 

7,004 38 

Total $451,006 78 

ST. VINCENT DE PAUL 
Staff- 
Salaries and retiring allowances $107,376 78 

Uniforms and mess 7,768 66 

Bonuses 35,935 40 

Retroactive salary 27,151 43 

$178,232 27 

. Maintenance of inmates — 

Rations $38,475 91 

Clothing and hospital 23,550 54 

62,026 45 

Discharge expenses — 

Freedom suits and allowances $ 4,551 44 

Transfer and interment 90 42 

4,641 86 

Working expenses — 

Heat, light and water $ 16,210 38 

Maintenance of buildings and machinery 23,864 97 

Chapels, schools and library 675 23 

Office expenses 1,832 63 

42,583 21 

Industries — 

Farm $ 5,676 70 

Trade shops 4,922 18 

10,598 88 

Prison equipment — 

Machinery $ 1.932 97 

Furnishing 1.017 57 

Utensils and vehicles 3,218 21 

Land, buildings and walls 13,258 20 

19,426 95 

Miscellaneous — 

Advertising and travel f 412 68 

Special 579 51 

992 19 

Total $318,501 81 



EXI'EXDITURE 31 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 

EXPENDITURE— C'on<m«ecZ 

DORCHESTER 
Staff- 
Salaries and retiring allowances $ 69,725 7.'! 

Uniforms and mess 5,793 74 

Bonuses 22,159 61 

Retroactive salary 18,51S 92 



Maintenance of inmates — 

Rations i 24,630 09 

Clothing and hospital 15,263 89 

Pischarge expenses — 

Freedom suits and allowances | 5,771 94 

Transfer and interment 96 53 

Working expenses — 

Heat, light and water $ 10,134 15 

Maintenance of buildings and machinery.. .. 7,292 46 

Chapels, schools and library 668 8S 

Office expenses 1,144 37 

Industries — 

Farm $ 5.595 88 

Trade shops 5.605 80 

Prison equipment — 

Machinery J 4,132 47 

Furnishing 2,657 41 

Utensils and vehicles 2,049 14 

Land, buildings and walls 35,769 91 

Miscellaneous — 

Advertising and travel $ 649 07 

Special 502 40 



$116,228 00 



39,893 98 



5,868 47 



10,239 86 



11,201 6S 



44,608 93 



1,151 47 



Total $238,192 39 

MANITOBA 

Staff- 
Salaries and retiring allowances $ 35,538 76 

Uniform and mess 5,437 55 

Bonuses 17,349 85 

Retroactive salary 14.676 28 

93,002 44 

Maintenance of inmates — 

Rations $ 14,239 44 

Clothing and hospital 6,807 28 

Discharge e-xpenses — 

Freedom suits and allowances $ 2,749 27 

Transfer and interment 140 77 

Working expenses — 

Heat, light and water $ 18,322 98 

Maintenance of buildings and machinery 4,073 65 

Chapels, schools and library 281 44 

Office expenses 781 44 

Industries — 

Farm $ 1,678 75 

Trade shops 3,233 10 

Prison equipment — 

Machinery $ 1,677 08 

Furnishing 893 74 

Utensils and vehicles 1,055 05 

Land, buildings and walls 8,206 35 

Miscellaneous — 

Advertising and travel $ 980 09 

Special 53 27 

1,033 36 

Total $158,176 14 



21,046 72 



2,890 04 



23,459 51 



4,911 85 



11,832 22 



32 DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

EXPENDITURE — Continued 

BRITISH COLUMBIA 
Staff- 
Salaries and retiring allowances $ 61,327 39 

Uniforms and mess 4,240 95 

Bonuses 13,682 89 

Retroactive salary 14,994 55 



12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 



Maintenance of inmates — 

Rations 9,947 51 

Clotliing and hospital 6,105 70 



Discharge expenses — 

Freedom suits and allowances $ 1,411 54 

Transfer and interment 1,085 66 



Working expenses — 

Heat, light and water $ 8,732 88 

Maintenance of buildings and machinery.. .. 1,870 32 

Chapels, schools and library 289 75 

Office expenses 879 39 

Industries — 

Farm 

Trade shops 



Prison equipment — 

Machinery 

Furnishing 

Utensils and vehicles 

Land, buildings and walls. 



Miscellaneous — 

Advertising and travel. 
Special 



$ 


2.160 20 
1,096 70 


1 


868 03 

498 27 

11,028 99 


$ 


1,658 53 
530 85 



194,245 78 



16,053 21 



2,-197 20 



11,772 34 



3,256 90 



12,395 29 



2,1S9 38 
Total 7^ $142,410 10 

ALBERTA 
Staff- 
Salaries and retiring allowances i 21,226 09 

Uniforms and mess 1,761 88 

Bonuses 3,297 69 

Retroactive salary 7,917 31 



Maintenance of inmates — 

Rations 

Clothing and hospital. 



Discharge expenses — 

Freedom suits and allowances. 
Transfer and interment 



$ 


2,093 00 
336 30 


? 


153 17 
1,078 39 



Working expenses — 

Heat, light and water 

Maintenance of buildings and machinery. 

Chapels, schools and library 

Office expenses 



Industries — 

Farm 

Trade shops. 
Coal mine . . 



Prison equipment — 

Machinery 

Furnishing 

Utensils and vehicles.. . 
Land, buildings and walls. 



; 


695 19 

734 31 

25 00 

809 70 


$ 


145 40 
1,034 28 
2,466 76 


? 


4,701 70 
9 35 
2 21 

2.609 79 



Miscellaneous — 

Advertising and travel $ 488 77 

Special 3.410 02 



$ 34,202 97 



2,429 30 



1,231 56 



2.264 20 



3,646 44 



7,323 05 



.898 79 



Total i 54,996 31 



EXPENDITURE 33 

SESSIONAL PAPf'R No. 35 

EXPENDITURE— r:'oji,;/,/r/,-,/ 

SASKATCHEWAN 

.st.-iri— 

Salaries and retiring' allowances $ r)2,15U 05 

Uniforms and mess 7,232 61 

Bonuses 1G.145 68 

Retroactive salary 11,089 5G 



Maintenance of inmates — 

Rations 17,952 96 

Clothing and hospital 9,504 69 

Discharge expenses — 

Freedom suits and allowances $ 2,420 45 

Transfer and interment 813 80 

Working expenses — 

Heat, light and water $ 21,508 32 

Maintenance of buildings and machinery. . . . 4,075 95 

Chapels, schools and library 213 89 

Office expenses 1,357 72 

Industries — 

Farm $ 8,590 77 

Trade shops 2,525 65 

Prison eciuipment — 

Machinery $ 1,352 51 

Furnishing 1,624 72 

Utensils and vehicles 1,025 50 

Land, buildings and walls '97,437 69 

Miscellaneous — 

Advertising and travel $ 205 04 

Special 173 45 



PENITENTIARIES GENERAL, 

Office expenses '. . . , $ 6 00 

Special ; .. 286 50 



$ 86,623 80 



27,457 65 



3,234 25 



27,155 88 



11,116 42 



101,440 42 



378 49 



Total J257,400 91 



Total 292 50 



35—3 



34 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 



APPENDIX •' D "—LIST OF OFFICERS 

As ON March 31, 1921 

KINGSTON 











Date 


of 


Date of 












First 








Name 


Rank 


Creed 


Date of 
Birth 


Permanent 
Appointment 


Present 
Appointment 


Salary 


General — 


















(0) Ponsford, J. C 


Warden 


Church of England 


Dec. 5. 1863 


Mar. 4 


1913 


Mar. 4 


1913 


?3, 180 


-Anglin, W. G 


Surgeon 


" " 


Oct. 8, 1856 


May 1 


19:0 


May 1. 


1920 


2,400 


McDonald, Rev. M.. 


Chaplain 


Roman Catholic. 


Aug. 4. 18.53 


Sept. 30 


1899 


.Sept. 30 


1899 


1,500 


Dobbs, Rev. O. G.. 


Chaplain 


Church of England 


Feb. 19, 1853 


Jlar. 29 


1913 


Mar. 29 


1913 


l.oOO 


Minnes, T. D 


Accountant 


Presbyterian 


May 29, 1859 


Mar. 13 


1913 


Mar. 13 


1913 


2,040 








Jan. 23, 1870 


Nov. I 


1903 


Dec. 19 


1912 


1,380 


Bcgg.H.S 




Church of England 


Oct. 27, 1879 


Oct. 1 


1902 


June 11 


1914 


1.320 


(Ij) K.ech, H. L 


" Methodist 


May 6. 1800 


Oct. 1 


1914 


May I 


1918 


1.320 


Grant. J. A 


" Presbyterian 


Mar. 21, 1891 Feb. 14 


1921 


Feb. 14 


1921 


1.320 


VanAlstyne. C. S' 


" Methodist 


Jan. 7, 1891 


Mar. 17 


1921 


Mar. 17 


1921 


1.260 


Uoliinson, A. N 


Prison Clerk . . Church of Knsland 


Aug. 12, 1873 


Feb. 1 


1921 


Feb. 1 


1921 


1,200 




Steward 




Oct. 26. 1883 


April 30 


1920 


April 30 


1920 


1,500 


iMadden P 


Assistant Steward 


Roman Catholic.. 


April 27, 1864 


Aug. I 


1889 


Aug. 1 


1913 


1,200 


(.c) Edgar. J 




Presbyterian 


Dec. 1. 1870 


May 8 


1916 


May 8 


1916 


1,140 


Raven, A. N 


Hospital Nurse 


Church of England 


April IS, 1893 


June 15 


1920 


Sept. 1. 


1920 


1.080 


McConnell. A. D 


" 




Jan. 29. 1886 


Sept. 11 


1921) 


Sept. 11 


1920 


1.080 


Draper, M. G 






Jan. 23, 1866 
.April 14, 1878 


Mar. 22 
Jan. 21 


1920 
1921 


Dec. 1 
Jan. 21 


1920 
1921 


1,020 


Assistant Matron 


Methodist... 


960 


Doolan. L. E 


" 


Roman Catliolic-. 


May 24. 1880 


Jan. 21 


1921 


Jan. 21 


1921 


960 


W) Nison.T 

Mcliav, W 






Feb. 7. 1873 


Mar. 19 


1920 


Mar. 19 


19V1) 


1.740 


Assistant engineer 


Presbjterian 


Nov. 6. 1870 


April 4 


I9I9 


April 4 


1919 


1,.320 







Church of England 
Baptist 


Sept. 5, 186. 
Oct. I, 1884 


Mav 12 
Jan. 13 


I'.lin 
1921 


May 12 
Jan. 13 


1919 
1921 


1,320 


Dennison, G. R 


1,260 


Tollerst, W 


FirATTinn 


Church of En gland 
Church of England 
Roman Catholic. 
Church of England 


Feb. !). 1871 
Mar. 3, 1872 
May 15, 1872 
Oct. 10, 1874 


Jan. J 
July 1 
Mar. 1 
Nov. 4 


1911 
191G 
1919 
1919 


Jan. 1 
July 1 
Mar. 1 
Nov. 4 


1911 
1916 
191Q 
1919 


1,080 


Bell G 


t€ 


1.020 




tt 


1,020 


Bottin*' G 


tt 


1,020 








Burns. R.J 


CliiefTrade Instructor 


Church of England 


July 23. 1855 


June 1 


1895 


July 1 


1903 


1.680 


Tweddell, J. 




Methodist 


Jan. 22. 1876 


Mar. 23 


1903 


Aug. 1 


1918 


1.560 


Beaupre, P. M 


Industrial Guard Quarry 


lioman Catholic . . 


July 29, 1860 


Jan. 10 


18S5 


April 1 


1903 


1.200 




Stn. Ctr. 


" 


April 15, 1869 


Sept. IS 


1X96 


April 1 


1903 


1,200 


Walker. H.L 


Blksm... 


Church of England 


Mar. 23. 1865 


AprU 3 


1897 


April 3 


1897 


1,200 




" Mason... 
;| M.Bags. 


Presbyterian 

Roman Catholic. 


Mar. 26, 1872 
Sept. 9. 1877 
April 20. 1875 


July 1 
Aug. 1 
April 1 


1902 
1906 
1895 


Mar. 16 
Aug. 1 
Oct. I 


190S 
1918 
1918 


1,200 


Doyle. F 


1.140 


Sullivan. G 


1.140 


Wilson. J. A 


" Mason... 


Presbyterian 


Aug. 5. 1875 


June 1 


1906 


April 1 


1919 


1.140 


(e) Corbett. A. J 


" Carpen- 


















ter 


'* ... 


Feb. 8, 1873 


Oct. 1 


1918 


Oct. 1 


1920 


1,140 


(./) Macdonald. J. A 


Tailor.. 


" 


June 17, 1871 


Nov. 10 


1914 


Nov. 10 


1914 


1,140 


Scott, J. A 


Shoe- 
maker. 


Church of England 


June 27, 1871 


Jan. 13 


1921 


Jan. 13 


1921 






1,080 


Mills.J.H 


Tin- 


















smith. 


Methodist 


Jan. 9, 1885 


Jan. 26 


1921 


Jan. 26 


1921 


1.080 


Purdy E. K.. 


" Farm. . . . 




Sept. 3, 1870 


Oct. I 


1916 


Jan. 1 


1921 


1,380 


Pohee— 










All Saints 


April 5, 1880 
Mar. 4, 1875 


May 6 
Aug. 1 


1914 
1905 


Jan. 1 
Mar. 1 


1921 
I9?1 


1,800 


Walsh. M.J 


Chief Keeper 


Roman Catholic . 


1,620 


(» jClayton.T 


Chief Watchman 


Church of England 


May 19, 1879 


Nov. 20 


1913 


May al 


1918 


1,380 


Kennedy, M. J 


Guard 


Roman Catholic. . 


April 18. 1857 


April 1 


18V2 


May 1 


1K,S4 


1,080 


McConvillc, A 






July 4. 1862 


July_ 1 


1SS5 


Julv 1 


1885 


1,080 


Mathews W H 


*• 


Church of England 
Methodist 

Roman Catholic. 
Methodist. - 
Roman Catholic. 


Oct. 20, 1865 
Sept. 1, 1861 
April 4, 1870 
July 8, 1867 
Aug. 24, 1873 
April 3, 1874 
July 9. ISSO 
.April 3. 1872 
July 28. I8S5 


Aug. 1 
Aug. 1 
Aug. 1 
Nov. 1 
Aug. 1 
Nov. I 
Oct. 1 
Nov. I 
July 1 


1899 
1899 
1899 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1907 


Aug. 1 
Aug. 1 
Aug. 1 
Nov. 1 
Aug. 1 
Nov. I 
Oct. 1 
Nov. 1 


1899 
1899 
1899 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1907 
1910 


1,080 




(( 


1,080 




« 


1,080 




*t 


1,080 


Powell H J. . . 


« 


1,080 


Lawless J I 


" 


1,080 


Donoghue, J. V 

Nolan O P 


n 


1,080 


•« 


1,080 


Walsh. ft. L 


" 


1910'July 1 


1,080 



(0) Transferred from Alberta, April 1, 1920. 
(6) Transferred from Alberta, July 1, 1920. 
(c) Transferred from Alberta. September I, 1920. 
W) Transferred from Dorchester, October 1, 1920. 
(e) Transferred from AlberLi, September, 1, 1920. 
(/) Transferred from Alberta, September 1, 1920, 
(g) Transferred from Alberta, April 1. 1920. 
(i) Transferred from Alberta. April 15. 1920. 



LIST OF OFFICERS 



35 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 



LIST OF OTYLCmiS— Continued 
As ON Marpii 31, 1921 — Continued 

JvIN G fiTOfs— Concluded 



Name 



Police— Con. — 

Bird. P 

Clark, R. A 

I>onaldson, S 

Spars, R. W 

Barr, A 

Morris. R.C., 

Tobin, T. . 

Euffy, n. F 

Clarke, T. N 

Harvey, F 

Filson. H. K. 

Miles, R.J. . 

Gilboy, J 

Pullen, A 

Tyson, W.E.. 

Archibald. W. N. 

Wcndholt, H 

Barton. F- . .... 

Marshall. F. X... 

Nicholson, K 

Cox, W.J 

Atkins, J 

Patterson, J. K... 

(i) Stead, \\.G 

0) Cleeton, H 

Hood. J. C 

McKav. A. D.... 

Edwards, J. .S.... 

Brown, A. D.. , 

Halligan. J 

Walsh, T.J 

Forsythe, A.. ... . 

Scammell, E 

(t) Aiken. G.O 

Turpin. R. O 

Shurtliff, r 

Silver. M 

(/) Cummings, E. H 
(nOLowes, P. S 

Porter, W. J 

.Snook, H. S 

Davies. F 

Wickh.am, W 

Holland, H, .. 

Dixon, Thos 

Sullivan, Leo 

Davidson, S. C... 

Watehorn, K. H.. 

Stephenson, J. \V. 

Johnston, K. N. , . 

West, W, H. 

Pocking. G.F.... 

Tavlor, W. S 

Earl. O. A 

.lenkin, M.E 

Walker, L. I...... 

Angrove. T. H . 

Bear;mce, R. E... 

Smith, G. R 

Hamilton, B. 

Bushey, W 

Woodhouse, H.... 

Spence, Jj. P 

Trotter, L. C 



Rank 



Guard 



Creed 



Roman Catholic 
Church of England 
Presbyterian . . . 
^lethodist,. 
Presbyterian . , . 
Church of l''npland 
Roman Catholic 

Methodist.. 
Church of England 
Presbyterian, . , . 
Roman Catholic 
Church of England 



Roman Catholic 
Church of England 



MethocUst . 
Church of England 



Presbyterian . . , 
Church of England 



Roman Catholic 
Church of England 

Methodist... 
Church of England 
Jlethodist.. 
Church of England 
.Methodist. . 
Church of England 

Methodist,. . 
Presbyterian , , . 
Church of England 



Presbyterian 

Roman Catholic, 

Presbyterian 

^lyndard, 
( 'hurch of England 

Methodist 

Church of England 
Presbyterian . . . 
Church of England 
>rethodist.. 
Roman Catholic 
Church of England 
-Methodist. . 



Church of England 

Baptist 

Church of England 
Methodist.. 



Date of 
Birth 



Deo. 

.Sept. 

Sept. 

Mav 

Dec. 

Jan. 

Mar. 

Nov. 

Aug. 

Auflc. 

Feb. 

Jan. 

Nov. 

July 

Sept. 

.April 

Jan. 

.Aug. 

July 

.April 

Deo. 

Oct. 

Aug. 

July 

Sept . 

.April 

Dec. 

Ma.v 

Sept. 

June 

Feb. 

Sept. 

Feb. 

April 

Oct. 

Feb. 

Nov. 

June 

Jan. 

.Sept. 

Mar. 

June 

Dec. 

June 

Dec. 

April 

Dec. 

Sept. 

May 

Oct. 

.Mar. 

July 

Jan. 

Oct. 

Dee. 

Aug: 

Nov. 

July 

Nov. 

Jan. 

Nov. 

Sept. 

Mar. 

Mar. 



1875 
bSXl 
l.STX 
I.SS.T 

i,s7n 

1880 
1880 

i.sn.1 
I88n 

1 8811 
I.S80 
I,S02 
1889 
I8fl4 
1.891 
189.') 
1893 
1S94 
1.893 
1898 
18,86 
18.86 
!S98 
ISS8 
1888 
189.1 
1882 
1889 
1886 
1883 
188' 
1 893 
1.S84 
1873 
1SS7 
I!>0' 
1 884 
I8S0 
18,83 
1890 
1893 
1883 
1898 
189.= 
1897 
ISS7 
1898 
1884 
1899 
1897 
1897 
1889 
1893 
1897 
1891 
18S9 
1.894 
189.') 
1896 
188.1 
1889 
1.893 
1881 
1896 



Date of first 

Permanent 

Appointment 



July 

April 
June 
I'eb. 
May 
Oct. 
Dec. 
Nov. 
Dec. 
Jan. 
Aug. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 25 
Oct. 17 
Oct. 15 
Dec. 22 
Dec. 22 
Dec. 22 
Dec. 22 
Dec. 28 
Jan. 29 
April 9 
Jtdy 1 
July 1 
Mav 1 
May 1, 
May I 
.Tune 10 
June 10 
June 16 
July 27 
-Aug' 1 
Nov. 1 
Feb. 1 
Aug. 24 
Oct. 2, 
Feb. 1 
Oct. 2 
Oct. 25 
Nov. 15 
Nov. 26 
Nov. 29, 
Nov. 29, 
Dec. 22, 
.Tulv 14, 
Dec. 22 
Dec. 23 
Jan 



Jan. 
.T.an. 
Jan. 
J.an. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
.Jan. 
Jan. 



18 
18 
18 
Jan. 18 
Feb. 15 
Jan. 24 
Feb. 11 
Mar. 21 
Mar. 19 
Mar. 21 



1910 

191 

191 

1914 

1914 

1914 

1914 

I9I4 

1914 

1917 

1914 

1919 

1919 

1919 

1919 

1919 

1919 

1919 

1919 

1919 

1919 

1920 

1920 

1914 

1914 

1920 

1920 

1920 

1920 

1920 

1920 

1920 

1920 

1902 

1921 

1920 

1920 

1907 

1920 

1920 

1920 

1920 

1920 

1920 

1920 

1920 

1920 

1920 

1921 

1921 

1921 

1921 

1921 

192! 

1921 

1921 

1^121 

1921 

1921 

1921 

1921 

1921 

1921 

1921 



Date of 

Present 

Appointment 



July 1, 

April 1 , 

June 1 , 

Feb. 

May 

Oct. 

Dec. 

Nov, 

Dec. 

Jan. 

Aug. 

Oct 



Oct. 31 
Oct. 25. 
Oct. 17, 
Oct. 15, 
Dec. 22, 
Dee. 22, 
Dec. 22, 
Dec. 22, 
Dec. 28, 
Jan. 29, 
April 9, 
July 1, 
July I, 
Mav 1 , 
Mav 1, 
May 1, 
June 10, 
June 10, 
June 16. 
July 27, 
Aug. 12, 
Oct. 1, 
Feb. 1, 
Aug. 24. 
Oct. 2, 
Tune 34, 
Oct. 2, 
Oct. 25, 
Nov. 17, 
Nov. 26. 
Nov. 29, 
Nov. 29, 
Dec. 22, 
July 14, 
Dec. 22, 
Dec. 22, 
Jan. 18. 
Jan. 18. 
.Ian. 18, 
Jan. 18, 
Jan. 18. 
Jan. 28, 
Jan. 18, 
Jan. 18, 
Jan. 18, 
Jan. 18 , 
Feb. 15, 
Jan. 24, 
Feb. 11. 
Mar. 21, 
Mar. 19, 
Mar. 21, 



1910 

191 

1913 

1914 

1914 

1914 

1914 

1914 

1914 

1917 

1914 

1919 

1919 

1919 

1919 

1919 

1919 

1919 

1919 

1919 

1919 

1920 

1920 

1914 

1914 

1920 

1920 

1920 

1920 

1920 

1920 

1920 

1920 

1920 

1921 

1920 

1920 

191S 

1920 

1920 

1920 

1920 

1920 

1920 

1920 

1920 

1920 

1920 

1921 

1921 

1921 

1921 

1921 

1921 

1921 

1921 

1921 

1921 

1921 

1921 

1921 

1921 

1921 

1921 



Salary 



1.080 

1,080 

1.080 

1.080 

1.020 

1.020 

1,020 

1,020 

1,020 

1,020 

1,020 

1,020 

1,020 

1,020 

1,020 

1,020 

1,020 

1,020 

1,020 

1.020 

1,020 

960 

960 

1,080 

1,080 

960 

960 

960 

960 

960 

960 

960 

960 

960 

960 

960 

960 

1,020 

960 

960 

9eo 

9(0 

960 
960 
960 
960 
900 
960 
960 
960 
960 
960 
960 
960 
960 
960 
960 
960 
960 
960 
960 
960 
960 
960 



(i) Transferred from Albert;!, .April 23. 1920. 
0) Tr.ansferred from .Alberta, April 13, I'I20. 

(f) Retired, May 21, 1914. Reappointo I .lune 21, 1915. Transferred from Alberta, .September 1, 1920. 
(ml Appointed guard. November 1, 1918. Re.si'zned, May 31, 1920. 
(i) Retired, Oct. 31, 1916. Reappointed Oct. 1, 1920. 



36 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 



LIST OF OFFICERS— Continued 
As ON March 31, 1921 — Continued 

ST. VINCENT DE PAUL 



Name 


Rank 


Creed 


Date of first 
Date of 1 Permanent 
Birth Appointment 

1 


Date of I 
Present 
.Appointment 


Salary 


General — 




Roman Catholic. . 

C)hurch of England 
Roman Catholic, 

Church of England 
Roman Catholic . . 

Presbyterian 

Roman Catholic. . 

M 

Church of Englanc 
Roman Catholic. 
Church of England 
Roman Catholic. . 


Aug. 28. 1861 July 10. 1912 
Dec. 17, 1880 Mar. 1, 1919 
Sept. 14. IseSlJunc 1. 1917 


Julv 10, 1912'S2,640 






Mar. 1, 1919 
June 1, 1917 
Mar. 1, 1919 
June 1, 1911 


1,500 


Oodard Rev H 




1,500 






June 9. 1879 
Oct. 24, 1801 
Sept. 17. IS86 
Mav 24, 1890 
Mar. 18, 1885 
Nov. 17, 18S7 
Oct, 28. 1875 
Oct. 18, 1874 
Feb. 17, 1876 
Oct. 4. 1879 
Nov. 24. 1878 
Mar. 16. 1866 


Nov. 1, 1916 
June 1, 1911 
Aug. 27, 1920 
Sept. 1, 1917 
Nov. 1, 1906 
Feb. 14, 1921 
Sept. 1. 1902 
July 1. 1901 
Oct. 14, 1912 
Mav 1, 1913 
Jan. 15, 1914 
Julv 1. 1905 


1,920 






1,440 


Cooper, H.W 

Sigouin, .■irm 

Murphy, J. M.R 


Warden's Clerk 


.Nov. 8, 1920 l,2f.O 




Al.2. 1, 1919 1,320 


Prison Clerk 


Aug. 1, 1919 1,260 




Fib. 14. 1921 1,200 






AuE. 1, 1907 1,020 


Aube, W 


Assistant Steward 


Nov. 1, 1906! 1.201' 


(o) Bastien, F. X 

Champagne, E 

Chateauvert, A. P 


Feb. S, 1919 
May 1, 1913 
Jiin. 15, 1914 
Dec. 1, 1916 
June 1, 1919 
Aug. 1, 1905 
Jan. 1, 1917 

Jan. 17, 1919 
Oct. 1. 1896 
Jan. 1, 1911 
Feb. 1, 1912 

July 1, 1912 
Jan. 1. 1914 

April 1, 1915 
Nov. 1, 1914 

Mar. 5, 1921 

June 7. 1919 


1,140 
1,980 


Assistant Engineer 


1,380 
1,320 




Dec. 29, I866IDec. 9, 1901 


1,320 




May 2, I860 
Nov. 19, 1866 

Jon. 22. 1868 
May 18, I860 
Dec. 13, 1S72 
Mar. 21, 1869 

Oct. 17, 1879 
Dec. 18. 1877 

June 17, 1886 
Jan. 10, 1857 

May 7, 1868 

Mav 23, 1860 


.\ug. 23. 18S2 
Jan. 1. 1917 

Jan. 17. 1919 
Aug. 31, 1S96 
Jan. 1, 1911 
Feb. 1, 1912 

July 1, 1912 
Jan. 1, 1914 

Dec. 1, 1912 
Nov. 1, 1914 

Mar. 5, 1921 

June 25. 1SS7 


1.200 


(6) deCotret, Dr. 0. R. . 

Induslrial — 

Kelly. .\nt 

Prevo«t W. 


.Assistant Hospital Nurse 
C T. Instructor 


1.140 
1.680 


Industrial Guard Quairj- 
TaUor. . . 
" Fanner.. 
" Carpen- 
ter 

" Mason. . . 
Black- 
smith . 
S. Ctr. . . 
Tin- 
smith 


1.200 


Pepin. J. E 


1,200 
1,200 


Godin.F.X 






1,200 
1,200 


Lesage R 






1,140 
1,140 


FUiatrauIt, Aza 

PoJice— 

Fitzgibbon, J. D 


1.080 
1,920 




June 17. 1863 July 19. 18S9;j3n. 1, 1912 
June 7, 1863 Nov. 9, lS93iJuly 1, 1912 


1,860 




Chief Watchman 


1,440 




Oct. 2, 1869 
Mar. 10, 1863 
July 18. 1862 
Mar. 14." 18.57 
Mav 21. 1864 


Oct. 19, 1896lOct. 19, 1896 
Oct. 1, 1897 Oct. 1, 1897 
Julv I, 1898 July '. 1898 
.\pril 24, 1899 .\u£. 24, 1899 


1,0S0 






1,080 




<( 


1.080 




u 


1,080 




11 


Dec. 1. 1S99 


Dec. 1. 1S99 
Mav 4, 1901 


1,080 


Filiatraiilt N 


« 


July 3, lS68iMav 4, 1901 


1,080 


Labrecque, J. E 


*t 


Feb. 17, 1874 
Dec. 27, 1882 
Nov. 29, 1871 
Mar. 9, 1S79 
Oct. 26, ISSl 
June IS. ISSl 
May 22. 1885 
Mar. 31. 1S87 
Sept. 29. 1889 
.\ug. 3. 1884 
Mar. 23. I8S8 
Aug. 25. 1886 


.■Vpril 24, 1905 
.4ug. 1. 1906 
.\ug. 1, 1906 
Mar. 1, 1906 
Nov. 1. 1909 


April 24. 1905 l.OSO 


u 


Aug. 1. 1906] 1,080 




" 


Aug. 1, lOOOl l.OSO 


Proulx M 




M:ir. 1. 1906 
N..V. 1, 1909 


1.080 


Pare, \ 




l.OSO 


Tptte V 




Oct. 1. 1910](!it. 1. 1910 
Julv 1. 1912 Julv I, 1912 
July 1. 1912Jul"v 1, 1912 
Aug. 1. 1912 Aug. 1. 1912 
Aug. 1. 1912 Aug. 1.1912 
Dec. 1. 19121Der. 1. 1912 


1.080 


Desrochers, J. B 


<• 


l.OSO 


« 


1,080 




4( 


1,080 


GodiD H 


it 


1,080 


Bolduc. M 


.1 


1.081) 


Poiricr D 


« 


Aoril 1. 1913 


April 1, 1913 
Aug. 1, 1913 
.Aug. I, 1913 
.Aug. I, 1915 
Jan. 1, 1917 
•Aug. 1, 1917 
Dec. 1, 1917 
Sept. 1. 1919 
Oct. 18. 1919 
Oct. 18. 1919 
Oct. 18. 1919 
Oct. IS. 1919 
Oct 18, 1919 
Oct. IS. 1919 
Oct. IS, 1919 
Oct. IS, 1919 
Nov. 1, 1919 
Feb. 21. 1920 
April 13, 1920 
April 27, 1920 
May 31, 1920 
June 15, 1920 


1,080 


Belanger, W 


ft 


Feb. 3. lS79iAug. 1. 1913 


1.080 


I.egault, A 

Deschambault, W. A. 


tt 


Aug. 17. 1S.S6 
Sept. 10, 1879 
Mav 23, 1S87 
Sept. IS, 1885 
Aug. 11, 1SS7 
Jan. 12, 18S4 
Sept. 26, 1894 
Aug. 23, 1S74 
Jan. 6. 1895 
Julv 6, 1897 
Nov. 8, 1893 
Oct. 15, 1896 
Nov. 5. 1890 
Oct. 20. I8S8 
Mar. 21. 1892 
June 4. 1881 
Dec. 25. ISSO 
Aug. 6, 1887 
Aug. 10. 1887 


Aug. 1. 1913 
Aug. 1, 1915 
Jan. 1. 1917 
.\ug. I, 1917 
Dec. 1, 1917 
Sept. 1, 1919 
Oct. IS, 1919 
Oct. 18, 1919 
Oct. 18, 1919 
Oct. 18, 1919 
Oct. 18, 1919 
Oct. 18, 1919 
Oct. IS, 1919 
Oct. IS, 1919 
Nov. 1, 1919 
Feb. 21. 1920 
.\pril 13, 1920 
April 27, 1920 
Mav 31, 1920 
June 15, 1920 


I,0SU 


M , 


1,020 




C( 


1.020 




K 


1.020 




«( 


1.020 




K 


1.020 




" 


1.020 


L'esperance. D 


It 


1,020 


« 


1,020 




t* 


1.020 


Aubfe. Z 


« 


1,020 




<f 


1.020 


Heneault, R 


U 


1,020 




» 


1,020 


St. Aubin, E 


(1 


1.020 


Wand G G 


(f 


960 




«( 


960 


Hamel, X 


« 


960 


Delorme, A 


(1 


960 


Girard. R 


" 


" ..lOct. 8, 1899 


960 



(a) Resigned March 31, 1921. 

(b) Dismisaed March 31, 1921. 



LIST OF OFFICERS 



37 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 



LIST OF OFFICERS— C'o»a;»ut<'rf 
As o.x Warcii 31, 1^21— Conthnied 

ST. VINCENT DE PAVL-Conduded 



Xutiie 


Rank 


Creed 


Date of 
Birth 


Date of first 

Permanent 

Appointment 


Date of 

Present 

Appointment 


Salor>- 


Police— Coa.— 

Berube, J. .... 


Guard 


Roman Catholic. 

Churcli of England 
Roman Catholic. 
Church of England 

Baptist 


Jan. 

Jan. 

July 

.Apri 

July 

.Aug. 

June 

Nov 

Dec. 

Feb. 

Mar. 

Mar. 

Oct. 

May 

Jan. 

May 

Mar. 

July 

July 

Oct. 

July 

Nov 

Julv 


26, 
16. 

4, 
16, 

9, 
21, 
2K, 

6, 

Is, 

15, 
17, 

5, 
19, 

7, 
31, 

20 ; 

18, 
29, 
26, 

s, 

9, 

09 


1894 
1885 
1881 
1891 
1885 
1892 
1886 
1888 
1,S8I 
1890 
1887 
1896 
1894 
1896 
1S87 
1S8S 
1883 
18S3 
1883 
18% 
1896 
1889 

is.^a 


June 15, 
June 15, 
June 30, 
Julv 8, 
Oct. 2, 
Oct. 7, 
Nov. 29, 
Nov. 29, 
Jan. 18, 
Jan. 18, 
Jan. IS, 
Mar. 7, 
Mar. 7, 
Mar. 7, 
Mar. 7, 
Mar. 7, 
Mar. 24, 
Mar. 24, 
Mar. 24, 
Mar. 24, 
July 20, 
Feb. 26, 

Mar. 1 , 


1920 
1920 
1020 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1921 
1021 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1921 
192(1 
1921 

1921 


June 15, 
June 15, 
June 30, 
Julv 8, 
Oct. 2, 
Oct. 7, 
Nov. 29, 
Nov. 29, 
Jan. IS, 
Jan. 18, 
Jan. IS, 
Mar. 7, 
Mar. 7, 
Mar. 7, 
Mar. 7, 
Mar. 7, 
Mar. 24, 
Mar. 24, 
Mar. 24, 
Mar. 24, 
July 20, 
Feb. 26, 

Mar. I , 


1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1920 
1921 

1921 


960 


Horsborough, J. A.... 
Hov, D 




9(10 




960 


Crandall. A. H 




9110 
960 


Kellett, G. H. 






Everitt, A J. 




960 






Roman Catholic. . 

Presbyterian 

Roman Catholic. , 

Church of England 
Roman Catholic. 


960 






960 






960 


McCk'lkmd. II. 




960 






960 


Winn, W. J .. . 




960 


Mclver, G 

Gravel, A 




960 
960 






960 






960 


Daly, J. L 

Humphreys. H 




960 




960 




960 


(.■) Waliquette. .4 


.Assistant Engineer 

Guard 


1,260 
960 


McClelland, J. J 


Industrial Guard Shoe- 
maker 


1,080 



(c) Dismissed March 31. 1921. 
(<;) Resigned March 31, 1921. 



DORCHESTER 



Oencrni — 

(a) Meighen, W 

Teed,J. F.,M.D 

Starratt, C. S 

Thomas, Rev. B. H. 

Dufour, Rev. P. P.... 

.'^oar.s.'T^ome 



Allain, \V. L 

Goad, G.T 

i.h) Bavlie, Ch.irlea... 
I.eBlanc, K<lward. . 
ll.iviland.E. H..., 
.\ison, Ediel 



,\lluin. .\deline... . 
l.i M<'Donald, A. M.. 

( 'iKipman, F. <>.. . 

I';ipineau, G. B 

I.une. Ernest 

Intlii •trial — 

Kane, J. J 

Foran, W.J. 



Bishop, W.E 

McPher^Jon, .Andrew.. 

McPherson. N. A 

Emen-, E. N 

I'ulir- — 

Elsdon. C. S 

McDougall. S 

Walsh, Thomas 

Drillio, George 

Brown, Arthur 

Getson.S. H 

{<il Belliveau, D, P 

Friel, Albert, 

Card, Charles 



Warden 

Surgeon 

.Accountant 

Chaplain 

Chaplain 

Prison Clerk Book- 
keeper 

Cler. .Assistant 

Warden's Clerk 

Engineer 

Assigl.Tnt Engineer 



Indus! rial Guard House- 
keeper 

Matron 

Steward 

.Assistant Steward 

Hospital Nurse 

Fireman 



Presbyterian. .. . 

Anglican 

Baptist 

Roman Catholic. 

Baptist 

Roman Catholic. 

Methodist 

Congregational... 
Rom an Catholic. 
Methodist 



C.T.I 

Industrial Guard Shoe- 
maker. 
Black- 
smith. 
" Farmer.. 

" Tailor. . . 

" Mason. . 



Deputy Warden 
Chief Watchman. 
Guard. 




.Anglican 

Roman Catholic. 

Anglican 

Roman Catholic. 
Methodist 



Roman Catholic, 



Methodist. . . . 
Presbyterian. 



Roman Catholic. 



Methodist 

Presbyterian 

Romim Catholic. 
Presb.vterinn.. . . 



Roman Catholic. 
Baptiet 



.Oct. 24, 
Feb. 23, 
Nov. 10, 
May 22, 
June 29, 

Nov. 13, 
April 13, 
Sept. 9. 
.Ian. 19, 
Oct. 2. 
Jan. 9, 

Sept. 19, 
Feb. 28, 
Nov. 26, 
Aug. 26, 
June 22, 
Feb. 4, 

Oct. 15, 

Nov. 15, 

Mar. 28. 

Aug. 10, 

Aug. 18, 

Aug. 13, 

Sept. 4, 
Oct. 18. 
Jan. 1. 
April 27, 
Sept. 23, 
Feb. 3, 
Jan. 28, 
Nov. 10, 
Nov. 30. 



1878 
1863 
1858 
1865 
1864 

1886 
1865 
1892 
1869 
1896 
1869 

1893 
1874 
1866 
1879 
1866 
1876 

1866 

1870 

1S69 
1861 
1880 
1875 

1869 
1871 
1 859 
1866 
1864 
1873 
1860 
1872 
1866 



June 1 
Feb. 1 
Sept. 1, 
Aug. 1, 
Nov. 16 



June 
June 
Aug. 
Oct. 
Jan. 



Sept. IS, 

June 7, 

Feb. 3, 

June 1 , 

Jan. 16, 

Jan. 1, 

Sept. 1, 

Jan. 21, 

Mar. 12, 

June 24, 
Mav 4, 
May 19, 
April 1, 

July 23, 
Julv 23, 
Dec. 1, 
Jan 



Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 



Aug. 14, 
Jan. 1, 



1914 
1914 
1905 
1906 
1916 

1914 
1917 
1920 
1890 
1919 
1919 

1920 
1921 
1891 
1912 
1886 
1917 

1907 

1907 

1920 
1910 
1913 
1916 

1895 
1895 
1896 
1898 
1898 
1898 
1901 
1906 
1907 



April 1, 
Feb. 1 , 
Mar. 1, 
Aug. 1, 
Nov. 16 



Oct. 

June 

Jan. 

Sept, 

Jan. 

Sept. 

June 7 
Feb. 3 
April I 



Apri 
June 

,Sept, 



Aug. 1 , 

Mar. 12, 

June 24, 

Mav 4, 

May 19, 

April 1 , 

Jan. I, 

April 1, 

Dec. 1, 

Jan. 1, 

Jan. 1 , 

Jan. 1, 

Feb. 16, 

.Aug. 14, 

Jan. I, 



1920 
1914 
1911 
1906 
1916 

1920 
1917 
1921 
1918 
1919 
1919 

1920 

1921 

1903 

191 

1S9S 

1917 

1910 

1907 

1920 
1910 
1913 
1916 

1921 
I9I6 
1896 
1898 
1S9S 
1S98 
1905 
1906 
190 



$2,700 
2.640 
2,040 
l,.50O 
1,,6()0 

1,320 
1 , 3.S0 
1.260 
1,860 
I,. 320 
1,320 

I,02O 
960 
1,620 
1 , 200 
1 . 200 
1,020 

1,6S0 

1,200 

1,080 
1,200 
1,200 
1,140 

1,800 
1,380 
I.OSO 
l.OSO 
l.OSO 
l.OSO 
1,080 
1,080 
1,080 



((I) Transferred from Alberta, .August 1, 1920. 

ih) Transferred from Kingston, September 24, 1920. 

(e) Resigned, March 31, 1894. Reappointed. November 1, 1894. 

(d) Resigned, December 2, 1903. Reappointed, February 16. 1905. 



38 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



LIST OF OFFICERS— Continued 
As ON March 31, 1921— Continued 

DORCHESTER-ConrluM 



12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 



Name 



Police — Con. — 

Bowea, F. C 

Cumming, A. B.. . 
Lowerison, B. A... 

Ward.X. P 

Sinclair. R.S 

Bourque, A. P 

Cook.C.E 

Thompson, H. R.. 
De Varenne, VV, J.. 

Mahan. C. J 

Babcock. C. P. ... 
Crossman, P. C. . . 

LeBlanc, F. L 

Palmer. \V. A 

Cole, Edgar 

Dobson, F. L 

Coleman, Samuel.. 
Whalen, Richard. . 

Pickles. W.S 

Kave. P. A 

Robinson, W.C. . 

Palmer, S. \ 

McDonald, J. D... 



Rank 



Guard. 



Cre«l 



Baptist 

Presbyterian 

Anglican 

Baptist 

Presbyterian 

Rx)man Catholic. . 
Baptist 

Roman Catholic. . 

Methodist 

Baptist . , 

Roman Catholic. . 

Baptist 

Roman Catholic. . 

-Methodist 

Roman Catholic. . 

Methodist 

Baptist 

Anglican 

Baptist 

Roman Catholic, . 



Date of 
Birth 



Sept. 

Dec. 

Feb. 

Oct. 

N'ov. 

July. 

Sept. 

Dec. 

.\pril 

Dec. 

Nov. 

May 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Jan. 

June 

Aug. 

June 

April 

Oct. 

Mar. 

July 

-4ug. 



Date of first 

Permanent 

Appointment 



1880 July 
1888; Nov. 



April 

Jan. 

Julv 

July 

Oct. 

Xov. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Oct. 

April 

April 

1890 Nov. 

ISSllNov. 

1897 Mar. 

1892 Mar. 

1885 April 



1879 
1879 
1882 
1877 
1887 
1893 
iS92 
1879 
1876 
1884 
1878 



1885 
1893 
1.S95 
1858 
1S7S 



1907 
1908 
1909 
1911 
1912 
1912 
1914 



Date of 

Present 

Appointment 



Salary 



July 

Nov. 

April 

Jan. 

Julv 

Julv 

Oct. 



1914 Xov. 
1914 Dec. 



April 
.April 15, 
Oct. 8, 
Julv 1, 
Jan. 1, 



1014 
1916 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 



Dec 

Oct. 

April 

.^pri" 

Nov. 

Nov, 

Mar. 

Mar. 

April 

April 
1920|.April 15 
1920 Oct. 8 
1901 Julv 1 
1903 Jan. 1 



1907 
1908 
1909 
1911 
1912 
1912 
1914 
1914 
1914 
1914 
1916 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1901 
1903 



1,080 

1,080 

1,080 

1,080 

1,080 

1,080 

1,020 

1.020 

1,020 

1.020 

1.020 

1,020 

1.020 

1,020 

1,020 

960 

960 

960 

960 

960 

960 

1,080 

1,080 



JLANITOBA 



General — 

Grahame, W. R,.. 
McFadden, J. J., M.T, 
Stewart, Rev. S. W. I . 
Blair, Rev. J. J. 
Keech, H. 

Macdougall, J. A , 
Woods. H... 

Freeman, E, 

Browne, J. W 

Shcad. W. H 

Industrial — 

Bloomfield. S. F 

Miller, T 

McCullough. J 

(n) V:ilpy, J. T 

Robertson, J. P. 

Martin, C 
Colire^— 

.McLeod, J 

Abbott, W.C 

Downie, R 

Fisher, A 

I.inkl;iter. G 

PoweU, J. A 

Meade. W. R 

Kirk. T. P 

(6) Nordin, E 

Ellison, C 

O'Connor, E 

(c) Meanev, D.J 

Macdonald. C. M 

Williams, J 

McT.ean. D 

Parkinson. R 

Stanhope, R 

Mcpherson, H 

.\nderson. H. G 

Kj-noch, .\. E 

Macdonald, H 

Erskine, J 

Watson. A 

Allen, J 

Campbell, D 

Johnston, E. C 

Inciter, J. J 

Campbell. A. H 



Warden 

Surgeon 

Chaplain 

Chaplain 

•Accountant and Store- 
keeper 

Warden's Clerk 

Prison Clerk Book- 
keeper 

Steward . , 

tlospital Nnr.se. 

Engineer 



c.T.r 

Instructor Shoemaker.. 

" Mason 

" Blacksmith - 

" Farm 

Tailor 

Deputy Warden 
Cluef Keeper 
Guard 



Presbyterian lOet. 19 

Church of England 

Methodist 

Roman Catholic. . 



Methodist 

Church of England 



Presbyterian 

Church of Engbnd 

C hurch of England 



Presbyterian . . . 
Church of England 

Presbyterian 

Roman Catholic 



'Presbyterian. 



Sept. 
Mav 

Aui. 

1 Mav 

Mar. 

I Oct. 

Jime 

. .\pril 

. Dec. 

June 

Nov. 

I " Mar. 

j Presbi*terian Dec. 

'Church of England July 

Presbyterian ' Dec. 

I Wcsleyan , , , | Dec. 



(""hurch of England 
Presbyterian 
Church of England 

Roman Catholic. 
Presbyterian 



Roman Catholic . 



Dec 21 
Julv 29 
April 22 

May 26 
June 25 

Sept. 18 

Mav 12 

Mar. 31 

June 4 

May 24 
Dec 17 
.\pril 10 
June 1 
Julv 16 
May 23 



Church of England 

Presb.vterian 

Church of England 
Presbyterian 



Church of England 
Roman Catholic. 

Presbyterian 



Mav 

Mar. 

April 

.\ug. 

Mar. 

Mav 

Mav 

Nov. 

Dec. 

.April 

July 

April 



1860 July 
1856 



1863 
1874 

1851 
1876 

1870 
1856 
IS89 
1869 

1880 

185 

1853 

1862 

1872 

18' 



1860 
1873 
1866 
1881 
1SS4 
1883 
1880 
1881 
1895 
1892 
1SS5 
1885 
1889 
1S.S0 
1886 
1881 

iss: 



I, 
Oct. 1 . 
Dec. 1, 
Feb. 1, 



IS9I[Sept. I 

1917'Oct. 1 

1907' Dec. 1 

1918 Feb. 1 



Nov. 22, 
Jan. 12, 

Oct. 20, 

Feb. 1, 
June 9, 
.Sept. 21. 

Aug. 1 . 
Dec. 10. 
July 15. 
Feb. 1. 
Oct. 16, 
Julv 5, 



1889 
1886 
1893 
1886 
1890 



1906 
1914 

1905 

I8S6 
1915 
1918 

1915 
IS92 
1907 
1912 
1912 
1913 



Jan. 

Mav 

Julv 

Feb. 

Julv 

Aug. 

.Aug. 

Sept. 

Mar. 

Mar. 

Julv 

July 

Nov, 

Mar. 

May 

Mar. 

Mar. 
1881 IMay 12 
1894 July 2 
1892. Sept. 11 
18840ct. 21 
18S6|Nov. 8 
1894, Feb, 



May 
Jan. 



Dec. 1 
Mar. 1 
Nov. 1 
Sept. 21 

Feb. 1 

Julv 23 

July 15 

Feb. 1 

Oct. 16 

July 5 



1898 Mav 
1903 April 
1902, Julv 
1912 Feb, 



1912 

191 

1913 



July 
Aug. 
Aug. 



1918!.Sept. 



Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 



Mar. 24, 



1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1921 



Mar, 
Mar. 
July 
July 
Nov, 
Mar. 
May 
Mar. 
.April 15 
Mav 12 
July 2 
Sept. 11 
Oct. 21 
Nov. 8 
Feb. 7 
Feb. II 
Feb. 14 
Feb. 14 
Feb. 15 
Mar. 24 



1916 
1917 
1907 
1918 

1907 
1914 

1920 

1903 
1919 
1918 

1917 

1895 
1907 
1912 
1912 
1913 

1914 
1914 
1902 
1912 
1912 
1912 
1913 
1918 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1921 



$3,060 
2,520 
1.500 
1,500 

2,040 
1,380 

1,260 
1,620 
1.140 
1.860 

1.560 
1.200 
1.200 
1.200 
1.200 
1.200 

2.040 
1.860 

i.o.«n 

1,080 

1.080 

1.080 

l.O.SO 

1.020 

1.020 

1,020 

1.020 

1,020 

1,020 

960 

960 

960 

960 

%0 

960 

960 

960 

960 

960 

960 

960 

960 

960 

960 



(a) Transferred from Alberta Penitentiary, August 31, 1920. 
(6) Transferred from Alberta Penitentiary, March, 1920. 
(«) Resigned, March 31, 1921, 



LtST Oh' OFFICERS 



39 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 



LIST OF OFFICERS— Continued 
As ON Makch 31, 1921^ — Continued 

BRITISH COLUMBIA 



Name 



General — 

Brown, John Cunning- 
ham 

Green, Thomas Ben- 
nett 

Harvey, James Milton 

Vert, Rev. Albert E.. 

Michel, Rev. Andrew 
(a) Stewart, Findley.. 

Emery. Frank Boueher 

Currie, William . 

Norman, Harry Fred- 
erick 

Robertson, Robert 
John.. 

Devine, Patrick 

Industrial — 

Imlah, John 

Mackenzie, Donald C. 

McLellnn, James.. -. 

Keeling, George H. H. 

Bresaer, Thomas 

Police — 

Patchell, William A.. 

TroUope. George W\ . 

Douglass, Robert. . . . 

Keenan, Patrick J.... . 

MuUins, Barnett A . 

Johnson, Harry 

Craig, Robert 

Petticrew, John , 

McCormack, Samuel. . 

North, Albert Thomas 

Wilson, Alexander... 

Goss, Jolin Lewis 

Da vies, William 

(6) Jack. Richard 

Bennett, WiUiam A. 

Wright, William 

Hyde, John 

McKenzie, Hector... 
(c) Clarke, John 

House, Nathaniel . . 

Fisher, Leonard C 



Surgeon (part time) . 

Accountant 

Chaplain 

Chaplain 

.Storekeeper 

Cler. Assistant 

Engineer 

Hospital Nurse 



Steward 

Assistant Steward. , 



Rank 



Warden. 



C.T.I 

Industrial Guard Tailor 
*' Carpen- 
ter 

" .Shoe- 

maker 
" Farmer. 



Deputy Warden. 
Chief Keeper. , . 
Guard 



Creed 



Presbyterian . 



Church of England 

Presbyterian 

Roman Catholic. . 

Presbyterian 

Church of England 
Presbyterian 



Church of England 



Presbj-terian 

Roman Catholic. . 



Presbyterian . 
Methodist.. . . 

Presbyterian . 



Church of England 
Roman Catholic. , 

Church of England 



Roman Catholic . . 
Church of England 

Presbyterian 



Church of England 

Mclhodist 

Presbyterian . . . 

Methodist 

Church of England 
Presbyterian. .. 
Church of England 

Roman Catholic. 
Presbyterian 



Church of England 



Date of 
Birth 



Feb. 13, 1844 



Aug. 15, 
Feb. 23, 
Nov. 1, 
July 2B, 
Aug. 11), 
Mar. 20. 
June .5. 



1874 
1856 
1869 
186: 

185; 

l.SbO 
1859 



April 30, 1874 



Jan. 28, 

July 20, 

July 20, 

.■Vug. 25, 



1865 
IS75 



1860 
1868 



Nov. 14, 1866 



.Lan. 
.\ug. 



Aug. 12, 
Aug. 8, 
Sept. 13, 
July 16, 
Oct. 4, 
Feb. 25, 
Oct. IS, 
Dec. 19, 
July 14. 
May 14, 
Mav 30, 
May 24, 
.Aug. 15, 
Dec. 2, 
April 20, 
Feb. 25, 
June 24, 
Oct. 14, 
June 24, 
April 17, 



1877 
1S86 

1862 
1887 
1891 
1879 
1881 
1885 
1876 
187; 
1890 
1885 
1893 
1884 
1893 
1883 
1883 
1885 
1886 
1881 
1887 
1899 
1886 



Date of first 
Permanent 
Appointment 



Nov. 26, 190: 



Mar. 8, 
June 29, 
May 16, 
Nov. 1, 
April 1, 
June 15, 
July 1, 



1921 
1895 
1904 
1919 
1885 
1914 
190S 



June I, 1906 



Oct. 11, 
-ipril 8, 

May 15, 
Mar. 4, 



1887 
1901 



1900 
1904 



Aug. 9, 1911 



Oct. 1, 

Feb. 14, 

Aug. 18, 

May 21, 

Dec. I , 

Dec. 1, 

July 1 , 

June 1 . 

Oct. 1 . 

Nov. 1 , 

Mar. 1, 

July 1. 

May 1 , 

May 1 , 

Nov. 1 . 

Dec. 1 . 

Feb. 15. 

Aug. 15. 

Aug. 15, 

J:ui. 12, 

Mar. 1, 

Sept. 13, 

Feb. 21, 



1911 
1921 

1890 
1920 
1913 
190' 
1910 
191 1 
1911 
191 J 
1913 
1913 
1914 
1914 
1914 
1914 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1920 
1919 
1920 
1921 



Date of 

Present 

Appointment 



Salary 



Nov. 26, 1907 



(a) Retired, March 31, 1921. 

(6) Returned to duty from leave overseas, August 31, 1920. 

(c) Transferred from Stony Mountain, August 10, 1920. 



Mar. 8 

June 29 

May 16 

Nov. 1 

Sept. 1 

June 15 

July I 

Sept. 1 

Sept. 1 
Sept. 1 



Aug. 
Mar. 



Mar. 1 
Feb. 14 



Jan. 
Jan. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
July 
June 
(let. 
Nov, 
Mar. 
July 
May 
May 
Nov. 1 
Dec. 1 
Feb. 15 
Aug. 15 
Aug. 15 
Jan. 12 
Mar. 1 
Sept. 13, 
Feb. 21 



1921 
1895 
1904 
1919 
1910 
1914 
1908 

1913 

1913 
1913 

1911 
1904 

1911 

1919 
1921 

1921 
1921 
1913 
1909 
1910 
1911 
1911 
1912 
1913 
1913 
1914 
1914 
1914 
1914 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1920 
1919 
1920 
1921 



$3,180 

1,500 
2. (MO 
1,.500 
1,500 
1,440 
1,320 
1,980 

1,200 

1,620 
1,200 

1.680 
1,200 

1,200 

1,140 
1,OSO 

1,020 
1,620 
1,080 
1,080 
1,080 
1,0S0 
1,080 
1,080 
1,080 
1.080 
1,080 
1,080 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
1,020 
960 
1,020 
960 
960 



ALBERTA 



Cashman, J. J.. 



Accountant Roman Catholic . April 15, 1857 Aug. 1, 1900 Aug. I, 1906 S2, 060 



SASICATCHEWAN 



General — 

MacLeod, W. J.., . 

Chishohu,J. S.. 

Gabillon, Rev. V.. 

Carrier, L. G 

Serjeant, F — 

Chapman, P. D. 

Tabbutt, J 

(o) Ewan, J... 

Malcolmson, D 

Steinman, A. M.. . 

Dussault, J. D. . . . 



Warden 

Surgeon 

Chaplain 

.Accountant 

Warden's Clerk 

Bookkeeper 

Steward . . 

Assistant Steward.. 

Engineer 

Assistant Engineer. 
Fireman 



Presbyterian 

Roman Catholic. . 

Church of England 

Presbyterian 

Church of England 
Presbj'terian 



Methodist. 

Roman Catholic . 



Aug. 7, 
Dec. 21, 
June 12, 
Sept. 4, 
Jan. 14, 
Jan. 17, 
Oct. 21, 
Feb. 28, 
June 9, 
Mar. 30, 
Deo. 8, 



1868 
1870 
1856 
1882 
1882 
1886 
1879 
1890 
1886 
1889 
1877 



Jan. 1 


1896 


Mar. 25 


1914 


Sept. 1 


1913 


Sept. 1 


1913 


Oct. 1 


1916 


Oct. 1 


1916 


Sept. 1 


19l;i 


Sept. 1 


1916 


April 12 


1912 


April 12 


1912 


Aug. 1 


1912 


June 1 


1920 


July 1 


1919 


July 1 


1919 


July 1 


1913 


Mar. 10 


1920 


Aug. 1 


1913 


Feb. 1 


1919 


June 1 


1916 


.Vug. 1 


1919 


Mar. 16 


1920 


Mar. 16 


1920 



S3, 180 
1,620 
1,000 
1,920 
1,320 
1,260 
1,560 
1,080 
1,860 
1,320 
960 



(a) Resigned, November 15, 1912, Reappointed, April 1, 1913. 



40 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 



LIST OF OFFICERS— ConcZucferf. 
As ON March 31, 1921 — Concluded 

SASKATCHEWAN— CoiirfuJeJ 



Name 



Industrial — 

Allan, R. M 

Cowie. G 

Anderson, J. A 

McCuUough.W.A. 

Darbv, C. S 

Tresidder, G. H... 

PhiUips, W.J 

Rogers, H. C 

Wootton, T.J 

Jackson. T 

Police — 

Wvllie, R 

Doolan, P 

O'SulUvan, D 

Hanson, A 

WUson. R. C. H . 

Blanc, P 

Green, C. H 

Temperton, J. R.. 

Macleod, J 

Pocock. S. C 

Hangerud, M. B,.. 

White, H 

Watkinson, J. V... 

Matthews, J 

Roberts, H 

Dent, C. L 

Tarr, ] 

Coi, W. B 

Moore, S 

Cameron, J. D 

Rowley, J. S. - 

McLaughlin, W. H 



Rank 



C.T. I 

Tailor Inst meter 

Farm Instructor 

ShoemaVer Instructor. 

Mason Instructor 

Blacksmith Instructor 
Brickmaker Instructor. 
Farm instructor 

Mason Instructor 

Carpenter Instructor. . - 



Deputy Warden. . . 

Chief Keeper 

Chief Watchman.. 

Guard. 



Creed 



Presbyterian. 



Date of 
Birth 



April 13, 
June 14, 

Baptist Aug. 4, 

Presb>-terian iSept. 20. 

Church of EnglandjJune 22. 

iiethodist.. iJune 11. 

Baptist Oct. 2S. 

Methodist [Dec. 24, 

Church of England.'April 18. 
Mar. 11. 



18S9 

18?2 
1887 
1S74 

1SS4 
1S» 

ls« 

1S94 



Date of first Date of 

Permanent i Present Salary' 
Appointment Appointment 



Presbyterian 

Roman Catholic. . 

Lutheran. 

Presbj-terian 

Roman Catholic. . 
Church of England 
Presbyterian 

Church of England 



Presbyterian . . . 

Methodist... . 
Church of England 

Presbyterian .. 
Church of England 



Aug. 1 . 

June 28. 

June 1. 

July 17. 

Sept. II. 

Sept. 1. 

Oct. 15. 

June 1. 
18S4June I, 
1883 June 8. 



I9I3 
191 
1914 
1919 



Nov. 
June 
June 
July 



July 24, 
.\pril 15, 
May 5. 
April 7, 
Mar 22. 
Feb. 3. 
Oct. 1, 
Sept. 17. 
Dec. 23. 
May 24, 
Aug. 15 
Dec. 7, 
Aug. 26, 
June 8. 
June 21. 
May 26, 
May 15, 
Mar. 22, 
Nov. 19, 
July 3, 
.\pril 12, 
.\ug. 6, 



1 882 
1881 
1868 
1881 
1S.S6 
ISS.* 
1891 
1889 
18S5 
-I.S92 
1894 
1S91 
1886 
1880 
1886 
1889 
1892 
1894 
1891 
1895 
1885 
1887 



1919 Sept 

1919 Sept. 
1919|Oct. 

1920 June 
1920 June 
1920 June 



July I. 
June 1. 
May 1, 
Jan. 1, 
Mar. I 
.\pril 1 
Feb. 1, 
.\ug. 1 , 
May 6 
Sept. 1 
Oct. I, 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 6. 
Feb. 21, 
Feb. 21, 
May 3, 
June 1, 
May 21, 
June 28, 
Jan. 21 
Jan. 20 
Mar. 7 



1912 
1911 
1911 

1912 



-May 
May 

May 
Jan. 



1917 M.ir. 
191 S .\pril 



1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1921 
1921 
1921 



Feb 
Aug 
May 
Sept 
Oct. I 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 6 
Feb. 21 
Feb. 21 
May 3 
June 1 
May 21 
June 28 
Jan. 21 
Jan. 
Mar. 



20 



1913 
1911 
1914 

19191 
19191 
19191 
1919 
1920 
1920 
1920 

1914 

1914 

1911 

1912 

191 

1918 

1919 

1919 

1919 

1919 

1919 

1919 

1919 

1920 

1920 

1920 

1920 

1920 

1920 

1921 

1921 

1921 



1.680 
1,200 
1.200 
1,140 
1.140 
1,140 
1,080 
1.080 
1,080 
1.080 

2.010 

1,740 

1,440 

1,080 

1,020 

1,020 

1.020 

1.020 

1.020 

1.020 

1,020 

960 

1.020 

960 

1,020 

960 

%0 

960 

960 

960 

%0 

960 




12 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 A. 1922 



REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT 



OF 



MILITIA AND DEFENCE 



CANADA 



FOR THE 
FISCAL YEAR ENDING MARCH 31 

1921 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF PARLIAMENT 




H.Q. 650-5-21 
100-11-21 

OTTAWA 

F. A. ACLAND 

PRINTER TO THE KING'S MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY 

192 1 

[No. 36—1922] 



12 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 A. 1922 



To General His Excellency the Right Honourable Lord Byng of Yimy, G.C.B., 
G.C.M.G., M.V.O., Governor General and Commander in Chief of the Dominion 
of Canada. 

May it Please Your Excellency : 

The undersigned has the honour to present to Your Excellency the report of thei 
Department of Militia and Defence for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1921. 

Respectfully suhmitted, 

H. GUTHRIE, 

Minister of Militia and Defence. 
Department of Mit.itla and Defence, Ottawa. 
November 1, 1921. 



12 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 A. 1922 



Ottawa, October 29, 1921. 

The Honourable the Minister, 

Department of Militia and Defence, 
Ottawa. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit for your consideration — to be laid on the Table 
of the House — this the Annual Report of the Department of Militia and Defence, for 
the fiscal year 1920-21. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

EUG. FISET, Major-General, 

Deputy Minister. 



36— IJ 



12 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No 36 A. 192^ 



i 



CONTENTS 

Reports of: 

The Chief of the General Staff. 

The Adjutant General. 

The Quartermaster General. 

The IiIaster General of the Ordnance. 

The Director of Pay Services. 

The Chief Accountant. 

The Assistant Deputy Minister. 

Appendices : 

A.-B. — ^Financial Statements. 

C. — Report of the Inspector General. 

D. — Report of the Superintendent, Dominion Arsenal, Quehec. 

E. — Report of the Superintendent, Dominion Arsenal, Lindsay. 

F. — Report of the Commandant, Royal Military College. 

G. — Report of the Board of Visitors, Royal Military College. 



12 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 A. 1922 



REPORT OF THE 
DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE, CANADA 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1921 



REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF THE GENERAL STAFF FOR THE TEAR 

ENDING MARCH 31, 1921 

During tlie past year the constitution of the Militia Council again underwent a 
change owing to the resignntion of General Sir Arthur Currie, G.C.M.G., K.C.B., etc., 
and the former system was resumed. 

The new Inspector-General has no seat in Militia Council, which is now composed 
as follows: — 

President, — The Honourable Minister of Militia. 

Vice-President. — Deputy Minister of Militia and Defence. 

Members.— The Chief of the General Staff, the Adjutant General, the Quarter- 
master General, the Master-General of the Ordnance. 

Secretary. 

Assistant Secretary. 

The committee which was appointed to consider the best way in which units of 
the Canadian Expeditionary Force could be absorbed in the Canadian Militia, com- 
pleted its labours during the year aud has been disbanded (Routine Order 2501, dated 
June 29. 1920). The decisions arrived at by the committee gave general satisfaction 
and the thanks of all ranks of the Canadian Militia are due to them. 

The Defence Committee 

In October, 1920, the Defence Committee, composed of the Director of the Naval 
Service, the Chief of the General Staff, the Inspector-General of the Canadian Air 
Force, and the Commissioner, Royal Canadian Mounted Police, was established with 
a view to co-ordinating effort in pursuit of a common policy and, especially, to ensure 
the co-operation of the forces (sea, land and air) in the event of war, otI othea? 
emergency. 

Since that date frequent meetings have been held at which were discussed matters 
pertaining to defensive arrangements, administration, works, combined training (naval, 
military and air force) aerial transport, and so forth. 

Intelligence has been exchanged and papers of general interest have been circulated 
among the members of the committee. 



g DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 
Military Operations and Intelligence 

Directorate Recreated December k, 1920 

On the outbreak of the war, 1914-18, the Staff OfBcer holding the appointment of 
Director of Military Operations ■was appointed to the General Staff of the First 
Canadian Division. The officer appointed to assume his duties was also appointed a 
Staff Officer in the First Canadian Division. Owing to the shortage of trained Staff 
Officers and to the pressure of work for the European War admitting of little time for 
attention to Home Defence, no further appointments of directors were made. The 
Assistant Director of Military Intelligence carried on the Intelligence duties; and the 
other duties of the Directorate, namely, those dealing with Operations and Organiza- 
tion were assumed by the Chief of the General Staff. 

On the departure of General Sir Arthur Currie from the Department as Inspector- 
General and the return to the old organization of a Chief of the General Staff and a 
Master-General of the Ordnance, the necessity for reinstituting the Directorate of 
Military Operations became apparent. 

Under authority of P.O. 2952 of the 4th December, 1920, the Directorate was 
re-established with an officer with overseas' service, and a Staff College graduate, as 
Director. The officer who held the post of Assistant Director of Military Intelligence 
during the war was retired to pension during the year and steps were taken to gazette 
an officer with overseas' service to fill this appointment. 

Normal Duties of the Directorate 

The normal duties of the Directorate may be divided into four parts, namely. 
Operations, Intelligence, Organization, and liaison with the other Directorates, par- 
ticularly those dealing with questions of Military Surveys, Signalling, Training and 
Organization. 

Work of the Directorate from Decemher J/, 1920, to March SI, 1921 

(i) Operations. — Immediately on the re-creation of the Directorate steps were 
taken to review all the Local Defence Schemes and to bring them up to date as far as 
possible and refer questions of policy in connection therewith for the decision of 
Militia Council. The work on the General Defence Scheme of the country was under- 
taken and considerable progress has been made in drawing up a proper scheme of 
direct defence for the country or for indirect defence, if it ever should be necessary 
to send abroad again an Expeditionary Force. 

(ii) Intelligence. — The work of carrying out Intelligence duties was given a new 
stimulus and a good deal of Intelligence collected. Intelligence is divided into two 
categories, namely, domestic intelligence, that referring to sedition, and military intel- 
ligence, being information of military intereet to assist in the defence of the country 
or to promote military efficiency generally. This Intelligence has been collected, 
collated, docketed, transmitted to proper authorities, and made use of generally in 
maturing military plans. 

The work of reorganizing the Intelligence personnel of the Canadian Militia 
and the providing of a system of training in peace for their duties in war has been 
undertaken. 

(Hi) Organization. — Questions of Organization, of establishments, of creation of 
new units, and other questions of military policy have been referred to this Directorate 
for investigation and recommendations. Further progress has been made towards the 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 7 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 39 

maturity of the Divisional System of Organization and the question of raising new 
units has been considered in connection with the man power of the country, the funds 
voted by Parliament for training, and the funds voted by Parliament for equipping, 
arming and providing the other necessities for a new unit. 

(/u) Liaison. — The policy of Military Surveys is one that materially affects this 
Directorate and is dealt with in conjunction with the Assistant Director of Military 
Surveys of the Branch of the Master-General of the Ordnance. 

The Militia should be trained along the lines that it may be used in the future 
for defence or for despatching an Expeditionary Force, therefore, the matter of 
training is carried out in liaison with this Directorate. 

The matter of Signal communications is one that vitally affects Operations, and 
matters pertaining to Signals are always discussed with this Directorate. 



Training 

Remarlcs. — (i) During the period under review conditions did not permit of 
training being carried out on a pre-war basis. A steady growth of enthusiasm was 
evident, however, and many of the difficulties encountered during the previous year 
were surmounted. 

(ii) This was due in a great measure to the scheme (authorized by P.O. 2296 dated 
September 10, 1920) under which 75 officers and 175 warrant and non-commissioned 
officers of the Permanent Active Militia were detailed to assist non-permanent units Ln 
reorganization and training. 

{ill) With a few exceptions, by this means the reorganization of the non-permanent 
units was accomplished and, by useful training, a foundation was laid for still better 
results in the future. 

Permanent Active Militia 

The training of units of the Permanent Active Militia was this year carried out 
in their respective areas under arrangements made by General Officers Commanding 
Districts, with the exception of the following units, which trained at camps of instruc- 
tion, as shown : — 

Units Camp Period 

R.C.D Petawawa 6 weeks 

L..S.H. (R.C.) Sarcee 10 weeks 

R.C.H.A Petawawa 4 weeks 

R.C.G.A.— 

No. 1 Company ) 

" 2 Company J Halifax 6 weeks 

" 3 Company Petawawa 4 weeks 

Det. No. 4 Company Halifax 9 weeks 

No. 5 Company Rodd Hill, B.C 3 weeks 

R.C.E.— 

1 Section 1st Fortress 

Company Halifax 8 weeks 

R.C.R Valcartler 12 weeks 

Non-Permanent Active Militia 

The reorganization of units of the Non-Permanent Active Militia was not consid- 
ered sufficiently advanced in the majority of cases to warrant the authorization of 
training at Camps of Instruction during the summer of 1920, and, therefore, trainimj 
at local headquarters only was permitted. 



3 DEPARTMEST OF MILITIA l.YD DEFEXCE 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

Owing to the assistance rendered by personnel of the Permanent Active Militia 
(referred to in para, (ii) above), there was a gratifying increase over 1919-20 in the 
ni\uiber of units which were able to perform training at local headquarters equivalent 
to twelve days, as shown in the following list : — 

Cavalry and Mounted Eifles 

The Governor General's Body Guard; the Princess Louise Dragoon Guards; 1st 
Hussars; 4th Hussars; 7th Hussars; 8th Princess Louise's N.B. Hussars; 10th Brant 
Dragoons ; 16tli Canadian Light Horse ; 19th Alberta Dragoons ; 1st Regiment Alberta 
Mounted Rifles; 1st (Mississauga) Regiment Ontario Mounted Rifles; 1st Regiment 
Manitoba Mounted Rifles. 

Artillery 

1st Brigade, C.F.A. — Headquarters; 1st Battery; 2nd Battery. 

2nd Brigade, C.F.A.—5th. Battery; 7th Battery; 66th Battery; 27th Battery. 

Srd Brigade, C.F.A. — Headquarters; 9th Battery; 30th Battery. 

4th Brigade, C.F.A. — 4th Battery; 34th Battery; 2nd Hvy. Battery (attached). 

6th Brigade, C.F.A. — Headquarters; 13th Battery. 

6th Brigade, C.F.4.— Headquarters; 35th Battery; 79th Battery; 24th Battery; 
81 St Battery. 

7th Brigade, C.F.A.— 12th Battery. 

8th Brigade, C.F.A. — Headquarters; 10th Battery; 11th Battery. 

9fh Brigade, CJ'.A.—Svd Battery. 

10th Brigade, (7 .F.A.— Headquarters; 18th Battery; 77th Battery. 

llih Brigade, C.P.4.— 16th Battery; 29th Battery. 

13ih Brigade, C.F.A.— Headquarters: Sth Battery; 89th Battery; 90th Battery. 

nth Brigade, C.F.A .—Headquarters ; 52nd Battery; 84th Battery. 

15th Brigade, C.F.A.— Headquarters: 31st Battery; 68th Battery; 5th Siege 
Battery (attached). 

16th Brigade. C.F.A.— Headquarters; 6th Battery; 36th Battery. 

17th Brigade, C.F.A.— 21st Battery; 64th Battery; 44th Battery. 

18th Brigade, C.F.A.— Headquarters; 20th Battery; 39th Battery; 91st Battery. 

19th Brigade, C.F.A.— 23rd Battery. 

£Oth Brigade, C.F.A.— 61st Battery. 

1st P.E.T. Heavy Brigade. — ^Headquarters; 2nd Siege Battery; 8th Siege Battery. 
14th Siege Battery. 

Snd Heavy Brigade, C.A. — 1st Heavy Battery; 3rd Siege Battery; 7th Siege Bat- 
tery: 10th Siege Battery. 

Srd N.B. Heavy Brigade. — Headquarters; 4th Siege Battery; 6th Siege Battery; 
]5th Siege Battery. 

1st Halifax Regiment, C.G.A. — Headquarters; 4 Companies; 9th Siege Battery. 

5th B.C. Regiment, C.G.A. — Headquarters; 2 Companies; 12th Siege Battery. 

6th (Quebec and Levis) Regiment, C.G.A. — Headquarters; 3 Companies. 

Engineers 

4th Field Company; 5th Field Company; 13th Field Company; 14th Field Com- 
pany; 4th Field Troop. 



DEPARTMEVT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 3e 



Signals 



No. 1 Signal Company; No. 4 Signal Company; No. 6 Signal Company; No. 8 
Signal Company; No. 10 Signal Company; No. 12 Signal Company; No. 3 Signal 
Troop. 

Corps of Guides 

No. 1 Cyclist Company; No. 4 Cyclist Company. 

C. 0. T. C. 

Mt. St. Louis College; Western University; Toronto University; Queen's Uni- 
versity; McGill University; Laval University (Montreal); MacDonald College; Loyola 
College; Laval University (Quebec); Dalhousie University; King's College; St. Fran- 
fwis Xavier; Mt. Allison University; New Brunswick University; Manitoba University; 
Brandon College; B. C. University; Saskatchewan University; Alberta University. 



Infantry 
(By Military Districts) 



M-D. No. 


1st Bn. 


1st Bn. 


1st Bn. 


1st Bn. 


1st Bn. 


1st Bn. 


tU.D. No. 


1st Bn. 


2nd Bn. 


1st Bn. 


1st Bn. 


1st Bn. 


1st Bn. 


1st Bn. 


1st Bn. 


lander 


1ft Bn. 


1st Bn. 


1st Bn. 


1st Bn. 



1— 

Oxford Eifles. 

Wellington Rifles. 

Elgin Regiment. 

Western Ontario Regiment. j,/ 

H.L.I, of Canada. 

Perth Regiment. 

a— 

Q.O. Eifles. 

Q.O. Rifles. 
R. Grenadiers. 
R. Hamilton Regiment. 
Lincoln Regiment. 
Dufferin Rifles. 
48th Regiment. 

Argyll and Sutherland Higli- 
s. 

Irish Regiment. 

Toronto Regiment. i/if 

Mississauga Regiment. 
Wentworth Regiment. 



1st Bn. Frontenac Regiment (H.Q. and 
two companies). 

1st Bn. Victoria and Haliburton Regi- 
ment. 



.D. No. .4— 

1st Bn. C.G. Guards. 

1st Bn. Victoria Rifles. 

1st Bn. R. Highlanders of Canada. 

2nd Bn. R. Highlanders of Canada. 

1st Bn. Car. de Sherbrooke. 

1st Bn. Sherbrooke Regiment. 

1st Bn. Irish C. Rangers. 

1st Bn. Montreal Regiment. 

1st Bn. Car. Mont Royal. 

1st Bn. Le Regiment du Joliette. 

1st Bn. Le Regiment de Ste. Hyacinthe. 

1st Bn. Three Rivers Regiment. 

1st Bn. Le Regiment de Maisonneuve. 



M.D. No. S— }1 

1st Bn. G.G.F.G. 
1st Bn. Kingston Regiment. 
1st Bn. Argyll L. I. 
1st Bn. Broekville Rifles. 
1st Bn. Ottawa Regiment. 
1st Bn. Peterborough Rangers. M. 

1st Bn. Hastings and P.E. Regiment, 

(H.Q. and two companies). 
1st Bn. Durham Regiment. •"' 

1st Bn. Northumberland Regiment 

(three companies). 



.D. No. 5— 

Ist Bn. R. Rifles of Canada. 

1st Bn. Les Voltigeurs de Quebec. 

. B. No. 6— 

1st Bn. Halifax Rifles. 
1st Bn. P. Louise Fusiliers. 
1st Bn. Colchester and Hants Regi- 
ment. 

:D. No. 7— 

1st Bn. St. John Fusiliers. 

.D. No. 10— 

1st Bn. Winnipeg Rifles. 

1st Bn. Winnipeg Grenadiers. 



■^Q DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AXD DEFENCE 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

1st Bn. Winnipeg L.I. M~D- No. 12— 

1st Bn. Cameron Highlanders. 1st Bn. S. Saskatchewan Eegiment. 

1st Bn. Manitoba Regiment. 2nd Bn. S. " " 

3rd Bn. S. 

M.D. No. 11— 1st Bn. N. 

1 . Tj -D n -n. • * 2nd Bn. N. " 

1st Bn. B.C. Eegiment. ^^^ ^^ -^ „ „ 

2ndBn. B.C. Eegiment. • ' - „ „ 

3rd. Bn. B.C. Regiment. ^^'^ ^"^^ ^^■ 

1st Bn. Irish Fusiliers. M.D. No. IS— 

1st Bn. Can. Scottish Eegiment. 1st Bn. Edmonton Eegiment. 

1st Bn. N.B.C. Eegiment. 2nd Bn. " " 

1st Bn. Seaforth Highlanders. 1st Bn. Calgary Eegiment. 

Machine Gun Corps 

1st C.M:.G. Brigade; 2nd C.M.G. Brigade; 3rd C.M.G. Brigade; 4th C.M.G. Bri- 
gade; 5th C.M.G. Brigade; 6th C.M.G. Brigade; 7th C.M.G. Brigade; 8th C.M.G. 
Brigade; 10th C.M.G. Brigade; 11th C.M.G. Brigade; 12th C.M.G. Brigade; 13th 
C.M.G. Brigade; 1st Motor M.G. Brigade; 2nd Motor M.G. Brigade. 

Army Service Corps 
No. 6 Company. 

Army Medical Corps 

No. 17 Cavalry Field Ambulance. 



Signalling 
Canadian Permanent Signal Corps 

The Canadian Permanent Signal Corps, consisting of 5 officers and 14 non-com- 
missioned officers, is at present organized under a temporary establishment authorized 
by General Order No. 27, dated April, 1919. This establishment is not wholly satis- 
factory, as it does not provide for even sufficient officers and instructors to supply the 
requirements of one quarter of the Military Districts in Canada, and does not provide 
for a Central Training Depot, or Permanent Army Signal School, which are neces- 
sary in connection with the supply and training of officers and n.c.o's for instructional 
work. 

Signal Inspection and Test Department 

In order to inspect, test and repair Signal equipment, and electrical apparatus for 
the Department of Militia and Defence, a Signal Inspection and Test Department 
was aiithorized in March, 1921. The machinery and electrical equipment has been 
ordered, and when received, the work of repairing technical equipment received from 
overseas for issue to Signal units will be commenced. Also, this department will be 
equipped to carry out any electrical tests or experimental work required by the Depart- 
ment of Militia and Defence. 

Schools of Instruction in Signalling 

The appointments of officers to the Permanent Signal Corps were not gazetted 
until August, 1920. The first School of Signalling held in Canada after the war was 
conducted in September and October, 1920, for District Signal Officers and Signalling 
Instructors. 

Instructors were not available to conduct Signalling classes until November, 
1920, and then only in a few districts. 



DKPAirrMENT OF MllJTlA AND DEFENCE 



11 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

The following table shows the number of Signalling classes held at local head- 
quarters of units in the various Military Districts from November, 1920, to March 
31, 1921:— 

Military Signalling Certificates Granted 

District Schools "B" "A" "Cadet" 

1 4 17 7 76 

2 2 10 2 63 

3 3 13 6 130 

4 2 13 .. 14 

(o) 5 

(b) 6 2 5 2 

7 2 14 4 12 

(0) 10 .. 11 1 

11 1 2 .. 34 

(6) 12 1 8 10 

(o) 13 

Grand total 17 93 32 329 

(a) No officer or instructor available. 

(6) Part time officer employed. 

(c) Officer only recently appointed. No regular instructor of the Signalling StafI available. 



Musketry 

Canadian School of Musketry 

No course at the Canadian School of Musketry was held during the period under 
review, nor was authority for the establishment of provisional schools of musketry 
applied for by District Commanders. 



Permanent Active Militia 

Early in 1920 instructions were issued that units of the Permanent Active Militia 
would fire the Courses laid down in Musketi'y Regulations, Part I (1909) (Eeprint 
1914), viz:— 

The Royal Canadian Dragoons 
Lord Strathcona's Horse (R.C.) 
The Royal Canadian Engineers 
The Royal Canadian Regiment 
The P.P. Canadian Light Infantry 
The 22nd Regiment 
The R. C. Machine Gun Brigade 
The Royal Canadian Artillery 
The R. Can. Army Service Corps 
The Royal Can. Ordnance Corps 



Appendix I. 
Tables "A" and "B" 



Appendix II. 
Tables "A" and "B" 



Non-Permanent Active Militia 

The annual musketry course for the Non-Permanent Active Militia was not gen- 
erally carried out during 1920, mainly owing to the fact that reorganization of units 
had not been completed. No class-firing was performed in Military Districts Nos. 
2, 5, Y, 10, 11, 12 and 13. 

Best Shot Badges 

To date, twelve badges, the conditions in regard to which are contained in Militia 
Order No. 199 of 1920, have been awarded to the "best shots" in the following units :— 

M.D. No. 1. — The Western Ontario Regiment; 2nd Canadian Machine Gun 
Brigade. 



^2 DEPAJtTMEXT OF MILITIA AXD DEFENCE 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

M.D. No. 3. — The Princess of Wales' Own Regiment; the Ottawa Regiment (The 
Duke of Cornwall's Own) ; the Peterborough Rangers. 

M.D. No. If. — 1st Canadian M. Machine Gun Brigade. 

M.D. No. 6. — The Princess Louise Fusiliers. 

M.D. No. 7. — New Brunswick University Contingent, Canadian Officers' Training 
Corps. 

Cambridge Challenge Bowl 

The Cambridge Challenge Bowl, which was donated by the officers of His 
Majesty's Regular Army on leaving Canada, for competition among units of the 
Permanent Active Militia (Militia Order No. 226, 1920) was won in 1920 by No. 1 
Fortress Company, The Royal Canadian Engineers. Average 81-16. 

Bifle Associations 

On March 31. 1921, there were in existence eighty-seven military rifle associations 
with a membership of 15,295, and two hundred and twenty-five civilian rifle associa- 
tions with a membership of 11,158. 

Rifle associations as under were active during 1920: — 
Thirty-four military, 
Sixty-five civilian. 

A large number of rifle associations (military and civilian) did not organizfe 
until late in the season, difficulties encountered being the delay and lack of money 
in getting their ranges into shape after remaining in a state of disrepair for sis 
years. These organizations will be much more active in 1921. 

The Dominion of Canada Prize, the conditions in regard to the competition for 
which are contained in Militia Order No. 169 of 1920, was competed for by twelve 
civilian rifle associations. 

Twenty-six Military, and seventeen Civilian Rifle Associations were organized 
during the year, while ninety-nine Military, and two hundred and fifteen Civilian 
Associations were disbanded. 

The Dominion of Canada and the different provincial rifle associations held their 
annual prize meetings in 1920. 

In addition to financial assistance and free ammunition granted these organiza- 
tions, the department also loaned tents, camp equipment and blankets. 

The Canadian Bifte League 

A grant of $500 was given by the department to the Canadian Rifle League for 
1920. A free grant of 960 rounds of service, gallery practice or -22" ammunition 
was also authorized for each team of ten men entering the service or indoor compe- 
titions of the League, and from the entries made therein, these concessions have done 
much to revive enthusiasm in rifle shooting. 



Schools of Instruction 

Courses in England 

The following officers and N.C.O.'s of the Permanent Active Militia proceeded to 
England during the period under review to attend the courses mentioned : — 

Staff College- 
Major E. L. Caldwell, R.C.D., from January, 1920, to December, 1920. 
Major and Brevet-Colonel T. V. Anderson, D.S.O., R.C.E., from January, 1920, 
to December, 1920. 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 13 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 3d 

Major and Brevet-Lieut.-Colonel F. O. Hodgins, D.S.O., R.C.E., from January, 

1920, to December, 1920. 
Captain and Brevet-Lieut.-Colonel J. M. Prower, D.S.O., R.C.M.G. Bgde., from 

January, 1920, to December, 1920. 
Brig.-General A. G. L. McNaughton, C.M.G., D.S.O., from January, 1921, to 

December, 1921. 
Lieut.-Colonel C. F. Constantine, D.S.O., R.C.A., from January, 1921, to 

December, 1921. 
Major and Brevet-Colonel H. F. H. Hertzberg, C.M.G., D.S.O., M.C., R.C.E., 

from January, 1921, to December, 1922. 
Captain and Brevet-Major H. T. Cock, M.C., E.C.R., from January, 1921, to 

December, 1922. 

Ordnance College Course — 

Capt. E. N. C. Bishop, E.C.O.C, from November, 1920, to August, 1921. 

Lieut, and Brevet-Capt. H. M. Reynolds, R.C.A., from November, 1920, to 

December, 1922. 
Lieut. G. F. Morrison, R.O.A., from November, 1920, to December, 1922. 

Gunnery Staff Course — 

Capt. F. C. Harmington, M.C., R.C.A., from October, 1920, to October, 1921. 
No. 4098, Sergt. E. Stevenson, D.C.M., R.C.A., from October, 1920, to October, 1921. 

School of Military Engineering, Chatham — 

Lieut. E. L. M. Burns, M.C., R.C.E., from June, 1920, to November, 1921. 

Lieut. G. N. Dickenson, R.C.E., from June, 1920, to November, 1921. 

Lieut. N. H. Clemes, R.C.E., from June, 1920, to November, 1921. 

Captain and Brevet-Major C. E. Turner, M.C., D.C.M., R.C.E., from September, 

1920, to May, 1922. 
Lieut. C. H. S. Stein, E.C.E., from September, 1920, to May, 1922. 
Lieut. W. H. Blake, R.C.E., from September, 1920, to May, 1922. 

Armament Artificer's Course — 

No. 34350, Armt. Q.M.S. E. King, R.C.O.C., from October, 1920, to November, 1921. 
No. 34412, Armt. S. /Sergt. Bracegirdle, R.C.O.C, from October, 1920, to 
November, 1921. 

Course in Canada 

In view of tbe limited funds available and the scarcity of qualified instructors, 
it was not considered practicable to reopen Permanent Schools of Instruction on a pre- 
war basis during 1920. To meet the growing demand from officers of the Non- 
Permanent Active Militia desirous of qualifying for their ranks, however, the follow- 
ing Permanent Schools conducted courses towards the close of the financial year:^ 

Permanent School of Cavalry, Winnipeg; Permanent School of Cavalry, Calgary; 
School of Military Engineering, Halifax ; Permanent School of Infantry, Halifax. 

Special schools, organized on the basis of Permanent Schools, were also established 
at Wingham, Ontario (for Cavalry), and St. John, N.B. (for Infantry), and in 
addition courses were conducted at Provisional Schools for the various arms shown 
in the following table: — 

-'^rm No. of Schools 

Cavalry 2 

Artillery 3 

Engineers 2 

Infantry 19 

Machine Guns 19 

c.A.s.c ; .. 

A Statement showing the number of officers and non-commissioned officers who 
obtained certificates at the above schools will be found on pages 18-19. 



^4 DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 
Staff Tours and War Games 

StaS Tours, War Games and Tactical Exercises, without troops, were carried 
out at various times and places under arrangements made by General Officers Com- 
manding Districts. 

Useful lessons were learnt and much benefit derived by all concerned. 

Examinations 

Promotion Examinations, Officers Permanent Active Militia 

The first post-war Promotion Examination was held in October, 1920. Out of 
a total of 15 officers who sat for this examination, 12 were successful. 

Examinations in Foreign Languages 

Examinations in French and German, under the regulations of the British Civil 
Service Commissioners, were held at certain centres in Canada in June, 1920, and 
January, 1921. At the former, four officers of the Canadian Permanent Active Militia 
qualified as interpreters in French, and one as interpreter in German. At the latter, 
three officers of the Permanent and one of the Non-Permanent Active Militia qualified 
in French. 

Cadet Services 

Strength 

During the period under review the amount appropriated by Parliament for 
Cadet Services was increased from $100,000 to $390,000, or only $2,500 lese than the 
amount authorized in 1914-15, when 50,064: Cadete were trained. The effect of thie 
increased vote was at once made apparent, for during the school year ending June, 
1920, 74,991 Cadets were trained, as against 60,788 in the previous school year. 

One hundred and six additional companies were authorized and 115 companies, 
which had for some years been inactive, were disbanded. 

One thousand four hundred and eight Cadets were appointed as Cadet officers 
during the year. 

The number enrolled and training on March 31, 1921, had further increased to 
81,493, organized into 713 Cadet corps comprising 1,627 companies. 

The number of Cadets by provinces was as under : — • 



Alberta 

British Columbia. 

Manitoba 

New Brunswiclt.. 
Nova Scotia and 

Ontario 

Quebec 

Saskatchewan . . . 



The increased appropriation made it possible for the first time since 1914 to hold 
Cadet Camps, but owing to the late date at which the money was voted, authority 
for thf holding of camps was not given until June 24, when most of the ichoolt; liad 
closed. Consequently, the attendance was reduced to 3,969. 





Year ending: 
June 30, 1920 

5,723 

4,442 

6,880 

1,553 

2.9S1 
24,183 
24,634 

4,595 


March 31, 
1921 
5,179 




4,350 




9.255 




1,210 


ward Island.. 


3,645 
26,217 




26,637 




5,000 








74,991 


81,493 


Cadet Camps 







DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 15 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

The reports from all districts in which camps were held were moet encouraging, 
and recommendatione that, in future^, the duration of these campe be extendol, were 
received. 

Instructional Allowances 

Owing to the difBculty in obtaining competent Cadet Instructors at the rate of 
reimineration authorized, the allowances were placed upon a pre-war basis of $1 for 
each Cadet present on parade at the annual inspection and found efficient. This 
slight increase was not found to provide commensurate remuneration to instructors, 
particularly those engaged in the training of Cadets at the smaller centres, and it 
was found necessary during the fiscal year under review to increase the instructional 
allowance to $2 per Cadet for the first 50 in a unit, and $1 for each Cadet above 
this number. This more adequate compensation of instructors has had a stimulating 
effect, and it is confidently believed a much higher degree of efficiency will be 
attained. 

Grant for Uniform 

During this period the grant of $1 per Cadet for uniform was again authorized, 
and also a sum of 25 cents per Cadet towards the provision and upkeep of a military 
head-dress. 

Physical Training 

Under the provisions of the constitution of the Strathcona Trust for the encour- 
agement of physical and militai-y training in schools, instructors were detailed for 
duty at various centres for the purpose of enabling school teachers to qualify ae 
Instructors in Physical Training; 4,317 candidates attended courses and 3,758 
obtained certificates of qualification. In order to provide additional instructors for 
these courses a special class was held at the Eoyal Military College, Kingston, when 
ten n.c.o's. of the Permanent Force obtained certificates qualifying them for employ- 
ment on this important duty. 

Cadet Corps Instructors 

Nine Cadet Instructors' Courses were held for male school teachers, at which 
305 certificates (Grade " A ") were issued to successful candidates. Two certificates 
of qualification for appointment to the Physical Training Cadre, non-permanent, 
were also issued. 

Signalling 

For the first time since 1914 Cadet Signalling Classes were held, at which 329 
Cadets passed the required examination and were awarded certificates. 

Competitions 

Several competitions for Cadets were held, chief among these being the Governor 
General's Challenge Shield Competition and the Imperial Challenge (Shield Compe- 
titions, senior and junior. 

In the first of these, for which a shield is awarded to the province which can 
show on MJay 24 each year the greatest number of enrolled Cadets between the ages 
of twelve and eighteen years, in proportion to the school attendance, the trophy was 
awarded to the province of Manitoba, to be held for the year by No. 538, St. John's 
College Cadet Corps, Winnipeg, which was found to be the most proficient in drill 
and musketry in the province. 

For the Imperial Challenge Shield Competitions, circulars, entry forms, targets 
and register cards were received from the Secretary, National Rifle Association. 



■J6 DEPARTilEXT OF MILITIA AXD DEFENCE 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

Bisley Camp, England. The circulars were despatched to all military districts for 
distribution to Cadet Corps and other organizations interested. Entries were received 
from 93 senior and 40 junior teams, a total of 133 Canadian entrants against 103 
laet year. 

Cadets have been encouraged to take part in the annual matches of the Provin- 
cial and Dominion Rifle Associations, and in the competitions of the Canadian Rifle 
League. 

Historical Section 

Receipts and Classification of Records 

A considerable quantity of overseas records was received from the officer in 
charge of the overseas detachment of the War Narrative Section, on his return from 
England. Other parcels of records were handed over by the officer in charge of the 
Air Force Research Section, with his final report, in September, 1920. Other impor- 
tant overseas documents have been transferred from the overseas section of the 
Central Registry of the Department. A large quantity of files of correspondence, 
relating to the war, have also been turned over from the Central Registry at Militia 
Headquarters, and other shipments of files of similar correspondence have been received 
from time to time from Military Districts. These files have been found to be of par- 
ticular value in clearing up questions for the Record Office, with reference to enlist- 
ments and discharges of recruits. The cinematograph records of the operations of 
the Canadian Forces in France and England have likewise been turned over to this 
section. All the above-mentioned documents have been duly checked, arranged in 
order, placed in covers and made accessible, and a large number of the original war 
diaries have been rebound in stiff covers to preserve them from damage in course of 
consultation, as far as possible. A hundred boxes of records received from infantry 
units have been examined and sorted and many valuable documents discovered. The 
final sorting and classification of the documents of the First Divisional Headquarters 
have been completed to November, 1917; and considerable progress has been made in 
sorting the documents of the Canadian Corps Headquarters. 

Indexing of Documents 

The index of the documents contained in the original war diaries has been 
lantern slides in the possession of this section. A card catalogue of the books and 
lantern sides in the possession of this section. A card catalogue of the books and 
printed documents in possession of the section is in course of preparation. 

Preparation of Location Ledgers 

The location ledger for infantry units of the Canadian Corps in the theatre of 
war, has been completed. It forms a volume of three hundred and eighty pages, with 
eighty lines to a page, containing approximately thirty thousand entries, showing 
daily moves, operations, engagements and map locations of the trenches and fronts, 
held by the battalions concerned. Many enquiries have been answered with respect 
to engagements in which particular units took part. Information with respect to 
map locations for registration of graves has been furnished as far as possible. A 
card index showing the map location of all trenches and places mentioned in war 
diaries is in course of preparation. 

Completion of Triplicate War Diaries 

Many applications have been received for triplicate copies of the war diaries from 
Ex-Commanding Officers of units for the purpose of compiling regimental histories. 



DEPARTMENT OF MiUTlA AND DEFENCE 17 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 39 

A comparison of these triplicate copies showed that many of the montlily diaries were 
missing; and in one particular case the diaries for sixteen months had been lost. 
In such cases copies were made of the missing text of these triplicate diaries and 
important appendices and reports on operations, in order to make the triplicate diaries 
complete before they were sent to the applicants. 

Properly completed applications were received for the diaries of the units named 
below. The original and triplicate copies were compared, copies made when necessary, 
and triplicate diaries were forwarded on the dates given: 

28th Battalion, April 27, 1920; 14th Battalion, May 11, 1920; P.P.C.L.I., May 14, 
1920; 16th Battalion, May 15, 1920; 49th Battalion, July 28, 1920; 43rd Battalion, 
October 30, 1920; 20th Battalion, December 28, 1920; 22nd Battalion, December 23, 
1920; 5th Battalion, March 30, 1921; 46th Battalion, April 2, 1921; 1st C.M.K., April 
12, 1921. 

Research Work 

Applications which have been received, from time to time, for permission to 
search the war diaries and other documents for historical information, have been 
granted, and every possible assistance has been given. Copies of documents have 
been furnished to several oiBcers of the permanent force requiring material for prepar- 
ation of lectures; and many enquiries by letter have been received and answered and 
the information supplied whenever practicable. In many cases these enquiries havs 
necessitated much research. 

Compilation of Narratives 

The narrative of the operations of the Canadian Machine Gun Corps has beeii 
completed and the typescript suitably bound. The compilation of the narrative of 
the operations of the Canadian Corps during the last hundred days of the war has been 
continued. A history of the Canadian Chaplain Services during the war has been 
undertaken and nearly completed. Further progress has been made in the selection 
of material and collection of data for the completion of a history of the Medical 
Services. 

Puhlications 

A monograph on demobilization entitled "The Return of the Troops" has been 
printed and distributed. A third volume of the History of the Military and Naval 
Forces of Canada covering the period from 1778 to 1784, has also been printed, and 
is available for distribution. The typescript of other volumes of this work bringing 
it down to the year 1815, has been prepared and made available for publication. 



36-2 



18 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 



12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 
RETURN OF CERTIFICATES GRANTED BETWEEN APRIL 1, 1920 AND MARCH 31, 1921 

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2 






















12 






















18 




1 
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4 
27 
























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8 
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16 
71 
























28 


























125 


























1 


























14 


19 


33 




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6 


24 




















31 








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23 
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62 






















62 
































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35 


49 


187 


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11 


305 


1 












14 


19 


621 

















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19 



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36-21 



20 DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 

12 GEORGE V. A. 1922 



REPORT OF THE ADJUTANT-GEXERAL FOR THE FISCAL TEAR 

ENDING MARCH 31, 1921 

On March 31, 1920, the date of the last annual report of the Department of 
Militia and Defence, the Adjutant-General's Branch consisted of the follo'n-ing 
Directorates, each Directorate being sub-divided into a number of sections to 
facilitate the performance of its various duties: — 

The Directorate of Personal Services. 

The Directorate of Organization. 

The Directorate of Medical Services. 

The Directorate of Dental Services. 

The Directorate of Chaplain Services. 

The Directorate of Records. 

The Directorate of the Judge-Advocate-General. 

The Directorate of Cadet Services. 

Early in 1920, the Canadian Army Dental Corps was demobilized, with the 
exception of the Director of Dental Services, a small staff at Militia Headquarters, 
and a District Dental Officer and Clerk in each Military District, all dental work 
required by ex-memhers of the C.E.F. being carried out by civilian dentists, prefer- 
ably those who had had overseas service. On the 31st March, 1921, all remaining 
personnel of the Canadian Army Dental Corps were demobilized, and the balance 
pf dental work still to be done for ex-members of the C.E.F. was transferred to the 
Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment. The Directorate of Dental Ser- 
vices was, therefore, disbanded and remaining dental matters have since been dealt 
with by an officer of the Adjutant-General's Staff. 

During the year covered by this report, the complete disbandment of the Dir- 
ectorate of Chaplain Servic/cs was also effected and matters concerning Chaplain 
Services for the Permanent and Non-Permanent Active Milita are now dealt with 
by the Director of Personal Services. 

The Director of Cadet Services was transferred to the branch of the Chief of the 
General Staff during the year ending March 31, 1921. 

A further reduction in the number of Directorates in the Adjutant-General's 
Branch was also accomplished 'early in 1921, by the abolition of the appointment 
of Director of Organization, whose duties were amalgamated with those of the 
Director of Personal Services, the officer performing the duties of these two Director- 
ates now being known as the Director of Organization and Personal Services. 

The reports of the various Directorates now comprising the Adjutant-General's 
Branch follow : — 

DmEOTORATE OF ORGANIZATION AND PERSONAL SERVICES 

Permanent Force 

The reversion of Permanent Force personnel from Canadian Expeditionary 
Force status to Permanent Force status was carried out with effect from May 31, 1920. 
The following new unit has been added to the Permanent Force: — 
22nd Regiment. — Organization consists of a Regimental Headquarters and two 
companies, with a total authorized establishment of 14 officers and 398 other ranks. 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 38 



21 



The following table shows the reorganized units of the Permanent Force, their 
authorized Establishments and Limited Establishments in personnel. 

The strengths of the respective units are restricted to the numbers laid down in 
the Limited Establishments. 



Unit 



Authorized 
Establishments 



Other 
Officers Ranks Total 



Limited 
Establishments 



Other 
OfBcers Ranks Total 



Actual Strength 



Othei 
Officers Ranks Total 



Royal Canadian Dragoons 

Lord .Strathcona's Horse 
(R.C.) 

Royal Canadian Artillery 

Royal Canadian Engineers 

Canadian Permanent Sig- 
nal Corps 

Royal Canadian Regiment 

Princess Patricia's Cana- 
dian Light Infantry. . . . 

22nd Regiment 

Canadian Permanent Ma- 
chine Gun Brigade 

Royal Canadian Army 
Service Corps 

Royal Canadian Army 
Medical Corps. .*. 

Royal Canad ian Army 
Veterinary Corps 

Royal Canadian Ordnance 
Corps 

Royal Canadian Army 
Pay Corps 

Corps of Military Staff 
Clerks 

Canadian School of Mus 
ketry 

(Spare) 



505 

516 

1,024 

360 

IS 
921 

690 
39S 



412 
101 

23 
700 
100 
199 

13 



533 

.544 

1,090 

408 

20 
957 

719 

412 

527 
445 
144 

30 
734 
140 
231 

17 



290 

227 
745 
260 

14 
513 

298 
217 

160 

346 
71 
21 

526 
75 

199 

6 
32 



310 

247 
811 
298 

19 
549 

323 
229 

185 

379 

103 

28 

560 

100 

213 

9 
32 



18 

17 
66 
38 

5 
36 

25 

12 

25 

33 

31 

7 

34 

25 

6 

3 



268 

193 
690 
214 

21 

458 

269 
198 

138 

329 
74 
15 

579 
76 

190 
2 



Totals. 



494 



6,457 



6,951 



395 



4,000 



4,395 



381 



3,744 



286 

210 
756 
282 

26 
494 

294 
210 

163 

362 

105 

22 

613 

101 

196 

5 



4,125 



Recruiting. — Recruiting has been carried out where necessary to fill any vacancies 
which have occurred from time to time in the Limited Establishments. Many appli- 
cations to enlist in the Permanent Force have been received from ex-soldiers of the 
C. E. F., but have in most cases been refused, there being no vacancies. 



Non-Permanent Active Militia 



The Canadian Railway Corps has been authorized as a Corps of the Non-Per- 
manent Active Militia. The organization of this Corps is at present under 
consideration. 

Good progress has been made in the reorganization of the Non-Permanent 
Active Militia. 

Peace Establishments have been laid down for the reorganized Non-Permanent 
Active Militia, and published from time to time in general orders. 
The following changes in organization have been effected : — 
(a) Cavalry. — Regiments of Cavalry and Mounted Rifles are now organized on 
a three-squadron basis. 



22 DEPARTMEXT OF MILITIA AXD DEFEXCE 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

(t) Engineers. — The organization of the Canadian Engineers provides for: — 

Divisional (or District) Engineer Headquarters 11 

Field Companies 33 

Fortress Companies 2 

Field Troops 7 

Army Troops Companies 5 

Bridging Train 1 

Tramway Companies 2 

Survey Directorate and Company 1 

Electrical and Mechanical Company 1 

Workshop Company 1 

As an interim arrangement organization has been restricted to the following 

units : — 

Divisional (or District) Engineer Headquarters 11 

Field Companies 15 

Fortress Companies 2 

Field Troops 7 

(c) Signals. — Provision has been made for the following organization: — 

Signal Battalions 11 

Fortress Signal Companies 2 

Signal Troops 7 

Sound Ranging Sections 2 

Artillery Observation Sections 4 

(d) Corps of Guides. — The Corps of Guides which previously consisted of 11 
Mounted Detachments, has now been reorganized and consists of 12 Cyclist 
Companies. 

(e) Canadian Officers Training Corps. — The establishment now authorized for a 
company, C. 0. T. C, corresponds with that laid down for a company of infantry. 

(/) Infantry.— Infantry Battalions are now organized on a four (double com- 
pany) basis, with a total battalion establishment of 31 officers and 540 other ranks 
(excluding attached personnel). 

(g) Canadian Army Medical Corps. — In the reorganization of the Canadian Army 
Medical Corps provision has been made for the following units: — 

Cavalry Field Ambulance 7 

Field Ambulance 27 

Sanitary Sections 11 

Casualty Clearing Stations 7 

General Hospitals 7 

Sanitary Hospitals 11 

Motor Ambulance Convoys 3 

Mobile Laboratory 1 

Reserve X-Ray Unit 1 

Base Depot Medical Stores 1 

Advanced Depot Medical Stores 1 

Except in the case of 22 Cavalry and Field Ambulances, and two Casualty Clearing 
Stations, organization of the units above enumerated has been restricted to the 
posting of officers only, and no expense has been incurred in connection with their 
organization. 

(h) Canadian Army Veterinary Corps. — The Canadian Army Veterinary Corps 
has been reorganized with a total establishment of 140 officers, 260 other ranks and 
140 horses. 

This includes: — 

Sections C.A.V.C 11 

Mobile Veterinary Sections 7 

Cavalry Mobile Veterinary Sections 2 

Regimental Veterinary Officers 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AXD DEFENCE 23 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 39 

(t) Canadian Ordnance Corps. — In order to provide a Detacliment of the Cana- 
dian Ordnance Corps for each Military District, eight more Detachments have been 
authorized. 

The establishment of each Detachment consists of 1 officer and 19 other ranks. 

(i) Canadian Postal Corps. — The Canadian Postal Corps has been reorganized 
and consists of one Base Post Office with Headquarters in Ottawa, Ontario, and 
eleven Detachments (one in each Military District). 

The total establishment of the Canadian Postal Corps is 13 officers and 45 other 
ranks. 

(A:) Corps of School Cadet Instructors. — The establishment of the Corps of School 
Cadet Instructors has been increased by 20 officers. 

Canadian Expeditionary Force 

Disibandment of Units. — Following the demobilization of personnel of units of 
the Canadian Expeditionary Force, and the necessary clearance certificates having 
been obtained in respect of accounting for stores, clothing, arms, equipment, regi- 
mental and canteen funds, practically all units of the Canadian Expeditionary Force 
have been officially disbanded. 

Regimental Funds Board. — ^The Regimental Funds Board which was appointed 
to audit and inspect accounts of canteen and other regimental funds of C.E.F. Units, 
and deal with questions concerning thase funds generally, has now been dissolved. 

Matters of this nature still requiring attention are dealt with in the Directorate 
of Organization of the Adjutant-General's Branch. 

Demobilization. — By the 31st March, 1921, the demobilization of the C.E.F. had 
been practically completed and the personnel disposed of; the last detachment in 
London, England, being demobilized on that date. 

The recoi-d<s and outstanding matters concerning C.E.F. are now being dealt 
with by the personnel of the Permanent Force at District Headquarters and Militia 
Headquarters. 

During the year the remainder of the O.M.F.C. together with remaining depen- 
dents, have been returned to Canada, and have been demobilized on arrival, where not 
returned for duty. All personnel had been disposed of by March 3]st, 1921. 

Co-ordination with the Department of Soldiers' Civil Re- establishment, also Board of 

Pension Commissioners 

The Department of Militia and Defence has continued to maintain the closest 
possible co-ordination with the above departments, both in connection with the demobi- 
lization of the remaining personnel and in connection with many outstanding cases 
referred to Militia Headquarters from ex-eoldiers themselves, or through the agency 
of the several ex-soldiers' organizations. 

Discipline 

During the past year all cases of discipline have been dealt with by this Directorate 
in co-opCTation with the Judge Advocate-General. 

Dress 

No action has been taken up to date of this report to revise Dress Regulations, 
as the Post Bellum Committee of the War Office is considering the whole question 
of dress and a decision has not as yet been arrived at. 

Regimental Crests and Badges 

During the past year action has been taken to authorize Regimental Badges and 
Crests for all units of the Non-Permanent Active Militia. 



24 DEPARTMENT OP MILITIA AND DEFENCE 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 
Ceremonial 

All matters connected with ceremonial have been attended to by this Directorate. 

Arrangements for the supply of Guards of Honour and Escorts were made on 
the following occasions: Arrival and departure of the French Military Mission; 
Departure of His Excellency the Duke of Devonshire, late Governor General; and 
the arrival of His Excellency the Governor General. 

Royal Military College 

The regular three-year course at the Eoyal Military College has now been extended 
to a four-year course. 

The Report of the Commandant will be found in Appendix E, and the Report 
of the Board of Visitors for the year 1920-21 in Appendix G. 

Officers' Messes Permanent Active Militia 

Action has been taken to revise and to authorize all the Regulations for Officers' 
Messes of the Permanent Active Militia. 

Movement of Troops 

No large movement of troops has been made within the last year, with the 
exception of the units of the Permanent Force going into camp. 

Military Funerals 
All matters concerning military funerals have been dealt with by this Directorate. 



Personal Services 

During the past year every endeavour has been made to expedite the rearrange- 
ment of officer i>ersonnel occasioned by the disbandment and reorganization of all 
Active Militia units. Although there is yet considerable to accomplish to fill all the 
commissioned ranks provided for under the establishments, good progress has been 
made and, with few exceptions, no serious difficulties are contemplated in completing 
a satisfactory and effective reorganization. The returns submitted by District Com- 
manders have revealed a ready response by officers who gained valuable experience 
during the late war, to continue serving in the Active Militia, with the result that 
a very high percentage of the officers already appointed hold Active Service qualifica- 
tions. ( 

The undermentioned statement indicates the number of units, by the various 
arms of the service, to which the establishment of officers have been gazetted during 
the year under report : — ff 

Cavalry 22 Regiments. 

Artillery 47 Batteries with the requisite Brigade 

Staf £ ; also 5 companies of Garrison 

Artillery. 

Engineers 6 Field Companies. 

Canadian Corps of Signals S Signal Companies. 

2 Signal Troops. 

Corps of Guides 1 Cyclist Company. 

Canadian Officers Training Corps 8 Contingents. 

Infantry 84 Regiments. 

Canadian Army Service Corps 13 Companies. 

Canadian Army Medical Corps 32 Medical Units. 

Canadian Postal Corps 11 Detachments. 



DEPATtTME'ST OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 25 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 3© 

Consequent upon the very large surplus of oifioers to be absorbed into Active 
Militia units on demobilization of the Canadian Expeditionary Force, it has been 
possible to allot a large number of them to the Reserve Units and thus retain their 
interest as well as their services should occasion for such arise. 

All qualified officers who have not accepted appointments in either Active or 
Reserve units have been extended the option of being placed on the General List 
of the Reserve of Officers, from which they may be recalled to the Active List at any 
time their services are required. 

In connection with the reconstruction of the Active Militia units, every effort 
has been made to fill the senior commissioned ranks from officers with creditable 
overseas records, and the selection of new Commanding Officers has also been given 
special attention, having due regard to the special qualifications necessary for such 
appointments. 

Policy regarding the status of officers appointed to the reorganized Active Militia from 

the C.E.F. Reserve. 

Every inducement has been held out to officers with creditable C.E.F. service to 
continue in the Active Militia on its reorganization, and although the establishments 
of the Active and Reserve units would not permit of all being appointed with sub- 
stantive rank in their respective units, equivalent to that held by them in the Cana- 
dian Expeditionary Force, regulations were introduced and approved whereby they 
receive a brevet rank in the Militia equal to their C.E.F. rank, thus overcoming any 
cause for grievance, and at the same time bringing into force a liberal policy giving 
recognition for service in the Canadian Expeditionary Force. 

Number of appointments to non-permanent Active Militia units. 

The following statement shows the number of officers (including provisional 
appointments) appointed to the Active Militia (non-permanent) during the twelve 
months ended March 31. 1921: — 

Cavalry 283 

Artillery 167 

Engineers 25 

Corps of Guides 5 

Canadian Officers Training Corps 49 

Infantry 1,193 

Canadian Machine Gun Corps 238 

Canadian Siijnal Corps 41* 

Canadian Army Service Corps 18 

Army Medical Corps 31 

Nursing Sisters, A.M.C 1 

Canadian Army Dental Corps , 1 

Canadian Army Veterinary Corps 5 

Canadian Postal Corps 3 

Canadian Ordnance Corps (non-permanent) 

Corps of School Cadet Instructors 4 4 

Canadian Militia (General List) 13 

•Temporary appointments (General List) 90 

Reserve of Officers 2,469 

Reserve Militia 

Total 4,689 



•Gentlemen promoted to commissioned rank in the C.E.F. who did not hold commissions 
in the Active Militia at time of such promotions, were granted temporary commissions in the 
Active Militia. If recommended by District Commanders, these are being absorbed into Active 
and Reserve units as vacancies arise. 



26 DEPARTMETs'T OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 
Document Commissions 

The number of document commissions prepared and issued to officers of the 
Active Militia during the period under review was 1,852. 

Fifty-two warrants were also issued to specially qualified non-commissioned officers 
who were seleoted for promotion to warrant rank during the same period. 

Militia List 

Owing to the necessity for a complete revision of the Canadian Militia List, con- 
sequent upon the reconstruction of the Active Militia, it has not been found practicable 
or in the interests of economy to produce an edition of this publication during the past 
year. The entire personnel, as well as the establishments and order of units, have 
undergone changes which necessitate a revision of this book from cover to cover. It 
was, therefore, decided to withhold its production until reorganization had well 
advanced towards completion. 

Resignations and Eetirvmenis, Permanent Force 

The reduced establishments of units of the Permanent Force, on the grounds of 
economy, has necessitated a decrease in the officer personnel, and the following state- 
ment shows the number of officers of each Permanent Force unit who vacated their 
appointments either by resignation or on retirement to pension: — 

The Royal Canadian Dragoons 11 

Lord Strathcona's Horse (R.C.) 8 

The Royal Canadian Artillery. . ; 15 

Royal Canadian Engineers 2 

The Royal Canadian Regiment 11 

Princess Patricia's Canadian IJght Infantry 3 

Royal Canadian Machine Gun Brigade 1 

Royal Canadian Army Service Corps. 9 

Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps 7 

Royal Canadian Ordnance Corps 9 

Royal Canadian Army Pay Corps 7 

Corps of Military Staff Clerks 6 

Not borne on regimental establishment 10 

Total 99 



Of the above, some 30 comprised former warrant and non-commissioned officers 
of the Permanent Force who gained promotion to commissioned ranks in the Cana- 
dian Expeditionary Force but who could not, owing to the reduced establishments, 
be continued in a commissioned capacity on reconstitution of the Permanent Force 
units, and, therefore, in the majority of cases, elected to be retired to pension rather 
than accept a lower status. 

Canadian Expeditionary Force 

Although the Canadian Expeditionary Force ceased to exist as a Force on Decem- 
ber 31, 1921, it has been found necessary to detail a small staff to deal with the many 
demands for information and miscellaneous correspondence relating to inquiries 
from ex-members of the force, the War Office, departments of the Federal and Pro- 
vincial Governments, as well as legal and commercial institutions, which, in the 
majority of cases, necessitate careful research before replies or decisions can be 
made. 

With the exception of the Military Hospital Staff at Winnipeg, and a few details 
at Militia Headquarters, the demobilization of the Canadian Expeditionary Force 
was completed by March 31, 1921. 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 27 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 3d 

Reserve of Officers, C.E.F. 

The Reserve of Officers, C.E.F., is rapidly being reduced as units of the Active 
Militia become reorganized, and as the names of officers are struck off this list on 
reappointment to their new corps. This Reserve will cease to exist on completion 
of reorganization as all the officers for whom no appointments have been found on 
reorganization will either be absorbed into the Reserve of Officers, Canadian Militia, 
with their present status, or be placed on the Retired List, retaining their rank, if 
they express their preference for such. 

Directorate of Medical Services 

During the period under review, the work of treating C.E.F. patients and the 
demobilization of the Medical Service was brought to a finality, with the exception 
of one hospital, The Manitoba Military Hospital, Tuxedo Park, Winnipeg, which 
was continued under special authority. 

On April 1, 1920, there were still in operation 11 Military Hospitals, with a bed 
capacity of 2,494, employing a personnel of 122 officers, 178 nursing sisters and 767 
other ranks. By the end of March, 1921, all hospitals had been closed, with the 
exception mentioned above; nine having been closed outright, and one transferred to 
the Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment. By the closing of these hos- 
pitals, there was a reduction in medical personnel of 115 officers, 164 nursing sisters 
and 708 other ranks. 

The Manitoba Military Hospital has been continued as a C.E.F. unit for the 
purpose of caring for patients of the Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establish- 
ment, which department has been unable to secure sufficient hospital accommodation 
in Winnipeg. On March 31, 1921, there were still in this hospital 23 overseas patients 
on the strength of the Department of Militia and Defence, 132 D.S.C.R. patients, 
and 50 D.S.C.R. patients attending for treatment. To continue the work of this 
hospital, it has been found necessary to retain on the strength of the C.E.F. six 
medical officers, one quartermaster, one adjutant, 14 nursing sisters, and fifty-nine 
other ranks. 

During the year there were treated in hospital 4,884 patients, made up as 
follows : — 

Over.seas 1,078 

Canada cases 2,594 

Others 1,000 

R.M.C 212 

the chief cause of admission being influenza and tonsilitis. There were 4,828 Medical 
Boards held during this period. The mortality amongst patients was low, there being 
only 25 deaths from all causes, a percentage of 0-51 of all patients treated. There 
were no epidemics of infectious diseases amongst the troops, but an outbreak of 
miunps during the winter months at the Royal Military College caused the admission 
to hospital of some 33 boys. No deaths occurred, and by the end of March the 
epidemic was stamped out. 

Upon the closing of C.E.F. hospitals, it became necessary to open Garrison Station 
Hospitals for the treatment of Permanent Force troops. In Halifax, Quebec, St. 
John's, P.Q., and Work Point Barracks, Victoria, these hospitals have been equipped 
for the treatment to a finality of all cases, while in Montreal, Kingston, Toronto, 
London and Calgary, owing to the reduced establishment of the Royal Canadian 
Army Medical Corps it has been found impossible to do more than establish Detention 
Hospitals, where patients are kept under observation for a short period before being 
transferred to civil or to D.S.C.R. hospitals. 

The work in connection with the Army Medical War Museum, including the 
collection and mounting of pathological specimens, has progressed favourably under 



28 DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

the direction of Dr. Maude E. Abbott, of McGill University, Montreal. It is expected 
that this Museum, with the Descriptive Catalogue, will have been completed by the 
end of the present fiscal year. In April, 1920, an officer of the Staff of the Director 
General of Medical Services visited the Army Medical ^Museum of the War Depart- 
ment in Washington for the purpose of studying the methods of preparation of 
specimens, and the general plan for the Medical War Museum. During the month 
of October, 1920, a most creditable exhibit of Canadian Army Medical Corps War 
Specimens was made at the American Medical Association Congress held at McGill 
University, Montreal. During March, 1921, twenty War Specimens of the Medical 
Museum were sent to Cleveland as an exhibit at the meeting of the International 
Association of Medical IMuseums held in that city. Dr. Maude E. Abbott, who was 
delivering an address at this meeting, was personally responsible for the safe return 
of all specimens. 

Upon the closing of C.E.F. hospitals, surplus medical and surgical supplies were 
collected into District Medical Stores, where they were sold by tender. During the 
year 1920-21, the sum of, approximately, $260,000 was realized from these sales. In 
addition to this, $30,000 worth of surplus stores was transferred to the Department of 
Justice (Penitentiaries Branch) without payment. Surplus stores not disposed of in 
Districts were shipped to Central Medical Stores, Ottawa, where there is still a 
considerable amount for disposal. In addition, there is a small amount in Military 
Districts Xos. 10, 11 and 13. Some difficulty has been experienced in disposing of 
these surplus stores on account of the market being more or less flooded with these 
goods. The total expenditure in the Medical Stores Branch for the year amounte(3 
to $13,088.54. 

The complete Technical Field Equipment for four Divisions, and the correspond- 
ing Lines of Communication Medica^ Units, has been received from England, and 
is held in Central Medical Stores as Mobilization Equipment. Technical Field 
Medical Equipment for approximately 75 per cent of the authorized units has been 
sent to each District, and is held there for training purposes. Quartermasters of 
the Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps are now stationad in Halifax, Ottawa, and 
Winnipeg, where have been established Central Medical Stores for the supply of the 
Maritime Provinces, Central Canada, and Western Canada, respectively. 

The reconstitution of the Permanent Army Medical Corps was made effective for 
officers from April 1, 1920, and for other ranks from May 1, 1920. The reorganiza- 
tion of the C.A.M.C., Non-Permanent, made good progress during the year. In all, 
77 Medical Units of the Active Militia have been reorganized and, in all cases, an 
officer has been recommended to command the unit, and, in addition, there have been 
recommended for posting to these units 382 medical officers, 31 Quartermasters, and 
12 nursing sisters; 168 Medical officers have been recommended for attachment to 
Non-Medical Units. Temporary Establishments for Medical units have been 
published, and are to obtain until Permanent Establishments, based on those of the 
War Office, have been authorized. In addition to the establishments of the regular 
Medical Units, an establishment has been laid down for a Camp Hoepital, and 
authority obtained for the units to recruit other rank personnel up to this establish- 
ment. 

During the year very little training of Medical units was carried out, owing to 
the fact that reorganization had not progressed sufficiently to warrant calling up 
units for summer training. The usual training of the R.C.A.M.C. personnel was carried 
out in Stations where facilities existed, such as Halifax, Quebec, St. John's, P.Q., and 
Esquimau. This training consisted of courses of lectures for N.C.O's., and the 
usual training in practical work. No qualifying courses were held for officer person- 
nel. 

One R.C.A.M.C. officer attended McGill University during the winter term, 
taking up work in public health, and at the Spring Convocation was given the degreo 
of "D.P.H." 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 29 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 39 

Judge Advocate-General 

During the year ending March 31, 1921, 168 courts-martial were held in Canada, 
of which 13 were General courts-martial, and the remainder District. 

By Army Order 137 of 1920, authority was granted to the Judge Advocate-General 
at the War Office to transfer to such officers in the overseas Dominions as might be 
appointed by the respective Governors General the proceedinge of courts-martial held 
overseas for the trial of members of the Military Forces of that Dominion, and by 
an Order in Council of June 15, 1920 (P.C. 1341), the Judge Advocate-General at 
Ottawa was authorized by the Governor-in- Council to receive the oourt-martial pro- 
ceedings held overseas for the trial of members of the Canadian Expeditionary Force, 
and arrangements were made through the Overseas Detachment, C.E.F., for the 
transfer to Canada of tiiese proceedings, which amounted to about 16,000. These 
are now at Militia Headquarters and are available for reference. 

At the beginning of the year covered by this report there were in England 14 
other ranks and one officer undergoing sentences of penal servitude and imprisonment 
awarded by the civil courts, and nine other ranks undergoing sentences awarded by 
courts-martial. Of the former two other ranks have completed their sentences and 
their cases have been disposed of, and, of the latter, one has completed his sentence 
and the case disposed of. 

The Judge Advocate-General was engaged in preparing material and giving 
evidence before the Special Committee of the House of Commons on Pensions and 
Soldiers' Civil Ee-establishment during the session of 1920, and certain important 
amendments to the Militia Pension Act and the Pension Act with regard to the 
payment of pensions under both Acts were approved by the Special Committee and 
passed by Parliament. 

The Judge Advocate-General acted as legal advisor to the Overseas Ministry in 
Ottawa whilst that Ministry was winding up its affairs, and, since the Ministry has 
ceased to function, all claims of a legal nature which concern the Overseas Ministry 
are referred to this office. 

The normal number of leases and agreements which this office prepares was 
materially increased by reason of the fact that a large number of leases and agreements 
in which the Crown, through the Minister of Militia and Defence, was a party were 
cancelled owing to the fact that it was decided that all properties possible should yield 
a rental based on a fair valuation of the same, rather than a nominal rental, with the 
result that new leases or agreements in respect to these properties had to be prepared. 

Owing to the large number of retirements to pension in cases of members of the 
Permanent Active Militia consequent upon the reorganization thereof, opinions with 
regard to the interpretation of certain portions of the Militia Pension Act were 
required, and, in addition, a number of the cases had to be referred to the Deputy 
Minister of Justice, all the material and the letter of reference being prepared by the 
Judge Advocate-General. 

The Judge Advocate-General, further, assisted the Department of Justice in a 
number of cases where actions were brought against the crown in respect of pay and 
allowances and pension. 

Pursuant to Routine Order 1736 of 1919, 44 dishonoured cheques, mess accounts, 
etc., aggregating $1,746.11 have been collected. 

The issue in March, 1920, of the new Pay and Allowance Regulations added to 
the work of this office, as owing to changing conditions, numerous amendments were 
required, most of which were submitted to this office. 



30 DEPARTMEXT OF illLITIA AND DEFENCE 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

The Directorate of Records 

The output of work performed by the Directorate of Records during the fiscal 
year 1920-21 shows a material increase over that of the previous year. 
This is mainly due to the following reasons — 

(a) The demobilization of District Record Offices in August, 1920, and the 
resultant centralization at Militia Headquarters of all reoord work in con- 
nection with the late war. 

(&) The very heavy detail in connection with the issue of the British War and 
Victory Medals and awards of all kinds. 

(c) The application of the Hollerith System of electrical sorting to the records 
of ex-members of the C.E.F. This system has been made necessary by the 
very large number of requests received, mainly for memorial, historical and 
statistical purposes, which could not be dealt with by hand without great 
delay and expense. 

The situation as regards the administration of military estates is satisfactory, 
with the exception of the difficulties encountered in clearing the estates where next 
of kin or beneficiaries are resident in Russia or other countries which are in a state of 
disturbance, and in the large number of cases in which the beneficiary cannot be 
located by any means so far attempted. 

New estates are being received daily on account of personnel dying while on the 
strength of D.S.C.R. 

On July 1, 1920, the " General List C.E.F." was created to take oare of all i)er- 
sonnel remaining on the strength of the iC.E.F., under the administration of the 
Director of Records. 

In November, 1920, the Secretary-General of the Imperial War Graves Com- 
mission in Canada took up his duties; the agency of the Department of Militia and 
Defence functioning through this Directorate, so far as the recording of graves is 
concerned. 

During March, 1921, the Pay Ledger Sheets and Unit Pay Lists previously on 
charge to the Separation Allowance and Assigned Pay Branch were transferred to the 
custody of this Directorate, enabling a considerable reduction in staff to be effected. 

(a) DOCUMENTS 

Total sets on file 31-3-21 594.152 

Miscellaneous documents filed 2,171,173 

Total researches and verifications of all kinds 979,251 

(b) HONOURS AND AWARDS 

Medals and decorations issued 1,209 

1914-15 stars issued 19,311 

King's certificates on discharge issued 3.266 

War Service Badges issued 4,107 

Memorial Crosses issued 46,413 

Canadian medals issued 251 

Certificates for "Mentions" issued 3.211 

Memorial Scrolls issued 39,849 

British War Medals Issued 8,339 

Miscellaneous 13,711 



Total issued 139,667 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 



31 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

(O) GRAVES AND CASUALTIES 

Period Total 
under recorded 
review approx. 

Engraved death certificates issued 438 60,438 

Graves recorded in Great Britain 2 3,509 

Graves recorded in France and Belgium 396 37,070 

Graves recorded in Canada 413 3.762 

Burial reports despatched 5,564 

(d) COREESPONDENCB AND ENQUIRIES 

Letters written 304,482 

Telegrams despatched 347 

Cables despatched 202 

(e) HOLLERITH 

Total cards punched 31-3-21 240,789 

Total medical cards punched, 31-3-21 101,167 

(/) ESTATES 

New estates received 658 

Estates distributed 1,513 

Estates on hand 31-3-21 -963 

Delayed shares on hand 63 

Funds awaiting distribution $195,603 79 

Funds held in trust $24,612 06 

Estates on hand are made up as follows : — 

(o) Action pending 210 

(b) Awaiting letters of administration 66 

(c) Bona vacantia 19 

id) No next of kin 16 

(e) Unable to locate next of kin 320 

(/) Unable to locate beneficiary 116 

((7) Next of kin in Russia 209 

(A) Under contest 2 

(«) Next of kin in late enemy countries 3 

O) Living man (deserter) 1 

(it) Insane man, escaped and not located 2 

963 



The total cost of operating the Directorate during the fiscal year 1920-21 was 
$C64,078.7S. That for 1919-20 was $657,434.32. Of the latter figure the sum of 
$123,864.30, representing separation allowance, assigned pay, and cost of living bonus, 
was not included in the two reports covering the year 1919-20. 

As, however, these expenditures are direcrtly chargeable to the maintenance of the 
Directorate, they are now included in all figures given. 

The net increase in cost is therefore $6,644.46, which is made up as follows: — 

1919-20 1920-21 Increase Decrease 

Personnel $580,320 81 $589,700 04 $ 9,379 23 

Operating expenses 32,168 21 18,203 38 $13,964 83 

Building and plant 44,945 30 56,175 36 11,230 06 

$657,434 32 $664,078 78 $20,609 29 $13,964 83 



The cost per diem per set of records kept for 1920-21 was -31 of a cent. 



32 DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 

12 GEORGE V A. 1922 



REPOET OF THE QUAETEE-MASTER GENERAL FOR THE FISCAL 
YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1921 

Supplies and Transport 

This Directorate includes all services in connection with the Army Service Corps, 
Veterinary and Postal Corps, and is administered by the Director of Supplies and 
Transport. The services performed are as follows: — 

Feeding and housing of troops and horses. 

Rental of buildings (in conjunction with Public Works Department). 

Heating and lighting of buildings. 

Dieting of hospital patients. 

Transportation by land and sea (ocean, rail, mechanical road transport). 

Horse transport and the provision of publicly owned horses. 

Veterinary services. 

Barrack services. 

Telephone services. 

During this period the amount of work consequent upon demobilization, lessened 
to a great extent, and the staffs at Headquarters and in the districts were reduced 
accordingly. Retrenchment in all services has been carried out as rapidly as possible. 

Supplies for Troops and Horses 

For the period covered by this report, 1,000 contracts for various supplies were 
made by the Director of Contracts, at the request of this branch. 

Eight hundred and thirty-six thousand, five hundred rations were issued to 
troops during the year ending March 31, 1921. These included alternate food supplies 
allowed under Regulations, but did not include fuel, disinfectants, etc. 

In addition to the above, 153,500 hospital diets were supplied. 

Five thousand, three hundred and forty-five tons of forage were issued during 
this period. 

In connection with the rationing of troops and horses, the Contracts Branch and 
the purchasing Commission of Canada have assisted in every possible way. 

Dieting of Hospital Patients 

Supplies for hospitals were taken care of by contracts, with the exception of the 
smaller centres, where authority was granted to obtain the supplies locally, owing 
to the small quantities required. 

All accounts and service requisitions covering expenditures of this nature were 
checked and passed for payment. 

Rental of Buildings 

During the period covered by this report, buildings which were still occupied for 
war purposes in March, 1920, have been gradually vacated, and the number of buildings 
so occupied is now reduced to a minimum. 

As Active Militia Units (non-permanent) have become organized, suitable 
accommodation, where necessary, has been rented. 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 33 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

Lighting and Heating of Buildings 

The supply of heat and light to all buildings occupied by this department has 
entailed a large amount of work, especially in securing the amount of coal required, 
owing to sliortage and the existing labour situation, etc., but in all cases the require- 
ments have been met. 

Transportion hy Ocean and Rail 

During this period there were very few troops returning from England, and no 
special arrangements were required to be made. Such details as did return were 
handled on regular trains. 

A considerable number of outstanding transport claims were audited and passed 
for payment, in addition to the current accounts for this branch of the service. 

Mechanical Transport 

With reference to the Mechanical Traneport Section, there were on hand, on 
March 1, 1920, the following vehicles : — 

Motor-cars 48 

Trucks 53 

Light deliveries and omnibuses 79 

Ambulances 55 

Motor-cycles 12 

The undermentioned vehicles have been disposed of during the year above 
mentioned : — 

Motor-cars .- . . . . 20 

Trucks 36 

Light deliveries and omnibuses 53 

Ambulances 33 

Motor-cycles 1 

There are now doing duty in the various districts, the following vehicles : — 

Motor-cars 28 

Trucks 17 

Light deliveries and omnibuses 26 

Ambulances 22 

Motor-cycles 11 

Horse Transport 

At the commencement of this period there were on hand in various parts of Canada 
a total of 690 horses, of which 118 were sold, four died, and four were destroyed, 
leaving a balance of 564. There have been during this period a total of 205 horses 
purchased, making the total number now on hand, 769 horses. 

Veterinary Services 
This service has been well maintained, and is now on a peace footing. 

Telephones 

During the period March 31, 1920, to March 31, 1921, aU the switchboards at the 
various district headquarters were done away with, and a system of direct telephones 
installed. 

This has resulted in a reduction of sixty-one telephones throughout the country, 
with a consequent saving in telephone rentals, amounting to $7,526.05, 
36—3 



34 ] DEPARTMENT OF illLITIA AND DEFENCE 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 
Barrack Services 

This service is responsible for the proper conduct of all duties in connection with 
the receipt, custody, issue and accounting for fuel, light, water, paillasse straw, 
barrack, prison and hospital clothing and other stores required for the use of troops 
in barracks and hospitals. 

War stores have been returned to Ordnance and the service reduced to peace 
conditions. 



Equipment and Ordnance Services 

The twelve months terminating March 31, 1921, has been a very busy period for 
this Directorate and for the Eoyal Canadian Ordnance Corps. The following is a 
review of the principal services that have been attended to, in addition to all routine 
work, which has proceeded as usual. 

Equipment from Overseas 

The following is a list of the principal stores received from overseas during this 
period, on demobilization of the C.E.F, : — 

Field guns 76 

Field gun carriages and limbers 90 

Ammunition wagons and limbers 360 

Travelling kitchens 100 

Water carts 100 

Other vehicles 150 

Bicycles 1,272 

Machine guns 2,029 

S.M.L,.E. rifles with bayonets and scabbards 49,000 

Cavalry swords 1.250 

Revolvers 5,000 

Wireless sets 82 

Ammunition Q.F. 18-pr. rounds 4,000 

Q.F. 4 . 5 How. rounds 5.000 

B.Li. 60-pr. rounds 1,000 

" B.L,. 6-in. How. rounds 2,000 

B.L. 8-in. rounds 200 

In addition to the above, large quantities of harness, saddlery, miscellaneous 
engineer stores, signalling stores, field sketching and other instruments and other 
miscellaneous stores have been received and distributed to Ordnance Depots and much 
of it handed over to units, on reorganization. 

Distribution of Equipments 

The following guns and their full equipments have been handed over to artillery 
units during the year, viz : — 

Guns and equipment to 35 Q.F. 18-pr. batteries. 

Guns and equipment to 12 4.5 Howitzer batteries. 

Guns and equipment to 2 60-pr. B.L. batteries. 

Guns and equipment to S B.L. 6-in. Howitzer batteries. 

Guns and equipment to 2 B.L. 8-in. Howitzer batteries. 

Additional to the above, training equipment, personal equipment, arms and 
clothing have been supplied as required to about 80 per cent of the total number of 
authorized units. 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 35 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

Tonnage moved 

The total tonnage handled in Ordnance Depots in Canada during the twelve 
months, April 1, 1920, to March 31, 1921, was:— 

Tons 

Received at Ordnance Depots 18,793 

Sent out of Ordnance Depots 14,836 



Total 33,629 



Overhaul of Bifles, Revolvers, etc. 

During the year, 47,700 S.M.L.E. rifles, and 500 iB.'S.A. pattern Lewis machine 
guns, received from overseas, have 'been overhauled by the staff of armourers at 
Quebec and distributed to districts for issue to units. The overhauling and repair 
of the balance is rapidly proceeding. 

Storage of Ross Rifles 

Approximately 90,000 Mark III Eoss rifles with their bayonets and scabbards, 
have been overhauled, made fit for long storage, and collected at one point for safe 
custody and storage. 

Inspection of Field Guns and Vehicles 

A complete examination has been made during the year by the Inspectors of 
Ordnance Machinery and their assistants, of all field guns, vehicles and technical 
stores in charge of non-permanent batteries, the necessary reports^ thereon have been 
rendered, and such action as was necessary has been taken i-egarding their repair. 

Sales of Surplus Stores 

Surplus stores to tlie value of $1,334,617 have been disposed of under approval of 
the Purchasing Commission, during the twelve months ending March 31, 1921. 

Estahlishmcnt — Regimental and Civilian 

On January 1, 1921. a reduction of 25 was made in the regimental establish- 
ment, E.C.O.C., and during the year, 64 out of a total of 128 civilians, who were 
doing duty on April 1, 1920, were dispensed with. 

Manufacturing Esiahlishments 

The Dominion Arsenals, Quebec and Lindsay, and the branch for the inspection 
of ammunition turned out in these establishments, have been administered by this 
branch during the whole year ending March 31 last. From August 15 to December 
15, these establishments were closed in order to enable the department to have the 
machinery and tools overhauled, placed in order, and reassembled in the various 
buildings in a manner more suitable for the economical production of ammunition 
under peace conditions, and for a complete stock to be taken and accounts audited. 
The establishments reopened and manufacture was resumed on December 15, 1920. 

The Eeports of the Superintendents of the Dominion Arsenals, Quebec and 
Lindsay, will be found in Appendices D and E respectively. 
36—3^ 



36 DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AXD DEFENCE 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 
Miscellaneous Services 

Publication of regulations, etc. : — 

(a) Scales to govern issue of clothing and equipment for "peace" purposes 
have been promulgated, with the exception of those for engineers and cyclists, and the 
necessary amendments to these scales have been published from time to time. 

(h) Existing regulations and orders have been republished or revised so far as 
has been necessary and opportunity permitted. 

(c) The Canadian Priced List of Clothing and Stores has been re-compiled, 
approved and passed to the printers. 

(_d) Practically every Militia Form that is in use by this branch and in the 
Ordnance Depots has been revised for republication. 

(e) Inspection of clothing and equipment for Non-Permanent Force. — The 
annual inspection of the clothing and equipment of all Non-Permanent iinite was 
carried out by Ordnance Officers in Districts, and reports rendered, except in a few 
cases where the unit had been too recently organized for the annual inspection to 
have been necessary. 

(/) Stocktaking in Ordnance Depots. — Special attention has been given to this 
subject during the year with the result that the stock in Ordnance Depots has been 
checked practically throughout, and discrepancies arising from war conditions, 
adjusted. 

(g) Magazine services. — The question of magazine accommodation ifor the 
reception of gun ammunition and explosives from overseas has been taken up and 
suitable arrangements made for storage. 

(h) Regimental tailors and shoemakers. — These services have been instituted, 
a regimental establishment for the purpose having been authorized; and supplies of 
the necessary materials for the master-tailors and master-shoemakers to keep the 
clothing and boots of the Permanent Force unite in repair, have been obtained. 

(t) Extended issues of Camp Stores. — Additional to the usual annual supplies 
of tents and other stores made to Non-Permanent units for training purposes, the 
policy of making similar issues to the Cadet Services was introduced during the year 
and has added to the labour of the Ordnance Depots. 

(;') Reserves of dental equipment. — A collection of dental equipment (technical 
and other stores), in each district, has been received by the Ordnance Officer from 
the demobilized dental authorities and is held in the Ordnance Depots for special 
services. 

(fc) Cordite, etc., taken over from the Imperial Munitions Board. — A large 
supply of cordite and certain other explosives received from the Imperial Munitions 
Board, free of cost, during the year, has been inspected by the Chief Inspector of 
Ammunition, classified and utilized as far as possible, and the unserviceable destroyed. 

(0 Dominion Rifle Factory. — The buildings formerly in occupation by the 
Dominion Rifle Factory, Quebec, were taken over and converted for use as an 
Ordnance Depot, and the machinery and stores taken over have been disposed of by 
sale under approval of the Purchasing Commission, from time to time, as found 
possible. 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AM) DEFENCE 37 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 



REPORT OF THE MASTER GENERAL OF THE ORDNANCE, FOR THE 
FISCAL YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1921 

Herewith are submitted reports on Engineer Services, on the Artillery, and on 
the work of the Survey Division, for the year ending March 31, 1921. 

Report on Engineer Services 

Administration of Engineer Services in the various Military Districts throughout 
Canada has, on the whole, been .satisfactorily carried out, although at times a great 
difficulty has been experienced, due to the lack of officers. This is partly accounted 
for by the necessity to reduce staffs which were built up during the war and partly 
on account of newly-appointed officers being sent to the iStaff College and to the School 
of Military Engineering for special courses. A further very serious difficulty has been 
experienced owing to the lack of experienced Military Foremen of Works. During 
the war no attempt could be made to train new Military Foremen of Works, and a 
large number of the old foremen have been retired ; and although every effort has been 
made, suitable men could not be found who would enlist. Training of suitable 
personnel has, however, been commenced, and a sufficient number of these men have 
been trained and these will greatly improve the situation dliring next year. 

During the war nearly all of the expenditure was on War Appropriation, which 
after the Armistice was changed to Demobilizatio'n Appropriation, and a very small 
amount of work carried out under the Vote Engineer Services and W^orks. The pro- 
portion between Demobilization Appropriation and the Vote Engineer 'Services and 
Works has been gradually reversed, so that during the year under report a greater 
part of the work has been carried out Tinder Engineer Services and Works and a 
smaller amount under Demobilization Appropriation. 

The work, therefore, has been divided into main heads — ^Under Demobilization 
Appropriation, various works, renovations, demolitions, etc., have been carried out, 
the necessity for which was brought about by the war. Ordinary maintenance, fair 
wear and tear and new services, have been carried out under Engineer Services and 
Works Vote. A detail of the more important work which was carried 6ut is given 
in para, (a) and (b). 

During the first half of the year only absolutely essential work -was undertaken, 
the governing policy being that, quite regardless of the funds voted by Parliament, 
every saving possible was to be made. This policy resulted in the postponement of 
many much needed services of a periodical nature such as outside painting, etc. In 
November, however, the unemployment of returned soldiers became so acute that it 
was decided to carry out any work for which value could be obtained, in order to 
relieve the situation. Under this policy a large amount of work of demolition of war 
buildings and the renovation of other war buildings was carried out, notably in 
Quebec, Kingston, Toronto and London. All of this work was carried out by day 
labour and only returned soldiers employed. The materials from the demolished 
buildings were sold retail, in order to give individuals a chance of purchasing the 
lumber for the building of houses in order to relieve the housing shortage. This 
method of sale resulted in obtaining a much larger sum for the material than would 
have been obtained had it been sold to professional wreckers or sold in bulk. 

No nev; armouries, drill halls, or rifle ranges were constructed during the year but 
the rifle ranges at Calgary and Edmonton were reconstructed. 



38 DEPARTMEAT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

During the war many alterations to military buildings were made and no proper 
plans prepared. In order, therefore, to bring all record plans up to date, a complete 
revision of plans of all buildings was commenced. This entailed a very large amount 
of work and satisfactory progress has been made, although the work has been delayed 
slightly, owing to the revision being undertaken only during the Engineer Officer's 
periodic visits to the various military buildings. This method was adopted in the 
interest of economy. 

Preliminary sketches and outline specifications have been prepared for a large 
number of armouries which have been placed on a " Priority List " and in conjunction 
with this work a comprehensive investigation has been made into the accommodation 
required for various units with a view to standardization. Further investigation has 
been made into a new and a more economical type of armoury of light construction; 
and from these results, detailed plans have been prepared of an armoury and drill hall 
to accommodate one battalion of infantry and one battery of field artillery. 

The detail of the more important work carried out is as follows: — 

(a) Chargeahle to Detnohilization 

London. — Demolition of temporary war buildings, renovation of Wolseley barracks, 
renovation of Tecumseh barracks. 

St. Thomas. — Eenovation of armouries. 

Windsor. — Renovation of armouries. 

Toronto. — Demolition of war buildings. Long Branch; renovation Toronto Arm- 
ouries; renovation College St. Armouries; making good damage Crawford, Givens 
and Clark Streets Schools ; making good damage. Dominion Orthopaedic Hospital. 

Camp Borden. — Salvaging of building material from temporary rifle range. 

Kingston. — Demolition of war hute; renovation of Armouries; renovation of 
Barriefield huts; renovation of Tete du Pont Barracks. 

Belleville. — Eenovation of Armouries. 

Brockville. — Renovation of Armouries. 

Gananoque. — Renovation of Armouries. 

Lindsay. — Renovation of Armouries. 

Ottawa. — Renovation of O.A.A.C. building; making good damage to Lansdowne 
Park. 

Quebec. — Demolition of Cove Field huts; making good damage to Immigration 
building; renovation of Citadel Barracks; renovation of Cove Field Barracks; fitting 
up Dominion Rifle Factory for Ordnance Stores. 

Valcartier. — Preparation of Camp for Czecho-Slovak troops. 

Beauport. — Renovation of Armouries. 

Levis. — Eenovation of Armouries. 

Halifax. — Renovation of war buildings; renovation of certain war buildings; 
renovation of Wellington Barracks; renovation of Glacis Barracks; making good 
damage to Militia Department's wharves in Halifax Harbour; making good damage 
to military roads, Halifax Fortress; fitting up old H.Q. building for oflice accom- 
modation; provision of crosses for C.E.F. soldiei-s' graves. 

Dartmouth. — Making good hospital accommodation. 

St. John. — Eenovation of Armouries. 

Sussex. — Eenovation of Armouries. 

Woodstock. — Eenovation of Armouries. 

Winnipeg. — Eenovation of Main Street Armouries; renovation of Ft. Osborne 
Barracks; renovation and alterations of Tuxedo Park; provision of Ordnance Stores. 

Vancouver. — Eenovation Armouries; making good damage to Exhibition buildings. 
Bastings Park; renovation buildings, Cambie Street. 

Eegina. — Restoration Hospital. 



DEPARTMENT OF MIUTIi AND DEFENCE 39 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

Prince Albert. — Kenovation Armouries. 
North Battleford. — Renovation Armouries. 
Moosomin. — Renovation Armouries. 
Indian Head.— Renovation Armouries. 
Grenfcll. — Renovation Armouries. 

(b) Chargeable to Engineer Services and Worhs 

London. — Repairs to Armoury. 

Guelph. — Repairs to Armoury. 

Toronto. — Repairs to Armoury; repairs to Long Branch rifle range. 

Hamilton. — Repairs to Armoury. 

Oshavpa. — Repairs to Armoury. 

Whitby.^ — Repairs to Armoury. 

Collingwood. — Repairs to rifle range. 

Kingston. — Repairs to Armoury. 

Brockville. — Repairs to Armoury. 

Picton. — Repairs to Armoury: 

Ottawa. — Construction of Cojinaught rifle range; repairs to Rockcliffe rifle range; 
repairs to Drill Hall and other buildings used for armoury purposes. 

Kingston. — R.M.C. repairs and upkeep. 

Lindsay.- — Repairs and upkeep Dominion Arsenal. 

Petawawa Camp. — General repairs and upkeep. 

Montreal. — Repairs to Armoury; repairs to Pointe Aus Trembles rifle range. 

Sherbrooke. — Repairs to Armoury; repairs to rifle range. 

Quebec. — Repairs to Armoury. 

Beauport. — Repairs to Armoury. 

Fraserville.' — Repairs to Armoury. 

Levis. — Repairs to Armoury. 

Montmagny. — Repairs to Armoury. 

Quebec. — Repairs to Chain Gate wall. 

Halifax. — Repairs to Armoury; repairs to batteries and military works in the 
fortress; repairs to retaining wall South' Dock; repairs to retaining wall Citadel Moat; 
street paving in front of military properties. 

Amherst. — Repairs to rifle range. 

Antigonish. — Repairs to Armouries. 

Camp Hughes. — General Maintenance and repairs; repairs to rifle range. 

Fredericton. — Repairs to Armoury. 

Sussex. — Repairs to Armoury. 

Winnipeg. — Repairs to Main St. Armouries. 

Camp Hughes. — General Mainteance and repairs; repairs to rifle range. 

New Westminister. — Repairs to Armoury. 

Vancouver. — Repairs to Armoury. 

Victoria. — Repairs to Armoury. 

Calgary. — Reconstruction of rifle range. 

Edmonton. — Reconstruction of rifle rnnge. 

Military Properties disposed of 

Aylmer, Ont. — Drill Hall site — Originally donated by the town, and retransferred 
:o the town as no longer required. 

Orillia, Ont. — Drill Hall site — transferred to the town of Orillia, in exchange 
for a new site. 



40 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 



12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

Binbrook, Ont. — Drill Hall site — sold to the town of Binbrook for the sum of 
$225 as site for a memorial tall. 

Kingston, Ont. — Little Cataraqui Redoubt — sold to the Cataraqui Golf Club 
and the Kingston and Portsmouth Electric Eailway Company for $11,170. 

Wallace, N.S.— Drill Hall site— sold for $400. 

The following properties were transferred to the Department of the Interior for 
preservation and maintenance as Historic sites : — 

Chrysler's Farm, Ont. — Monument site. 

Chateauguay, P.Q. — Monument site. 

Chambly, P.Q. — Old Fort and burying ground. 

Isle-aux-Noix, Que. — site of Fort Lennox. 

Militai'y Properties acquired 

Quebec.^ — SeVen small parcels of land with buildings purchased on account of 
dangerous condition of cliff. 



Report of Staff Officer, Artillery 

Reorganization of Artillery 

The following units, Canadian Artillery, have been authorized: 58 Batteries of 
Field Artillery, 15 Batteries of Heavy and Siege Artillery, 3 Eegiments of Garrison 
Artillery, consisting of 9 Companies and 3 Anti-Aircraft Sections. 

The reorganization of these units is proceeding along sound lines, and with the 
majority hae already reached a satisfactory basis. 

Guns have been allotted to all Field, Heavy and Siege Artillery Batteries, and 
in most cases taken over by the O.C. unit. In a few instances suitable accommoda- 
tion is not yet available and the equipment is, therefore, retained in Ordnance Corps 
charge. Guns for Anti-Aircraft Sections are also available and will be issued at an 
early date. 

A record of services of ex-officere Canadian Corps Artillery (C.E.F.) has been 
compiled. The greater majority of officers now being gazetted to Non-Permanent 
Artillery are those having had overseas experience. The following appointments have 
been approved: 470 officers appointed to unite, 147 officers to Corps Reserve, 202 
officers to Reserve of Officers. 

Reorganization of Royal School of Artillery 

A complete reorganization of the Royal Schools of Artillery has been recom- 
mended and approved, a new school being authorized at Winnipeg, Man. By this 
arrangement all officei« and N.C.O's, western artillery units, will receive their training 
in the west, thus causing a considerable saving in the cost of transport and pay ; and, 
in addition, will be of great convenience to militiamen desiring to qualify for their 
rank or for promotion. 

Training 

Training under canvas and artillery practice was not carried out in 1920 by 
Non-Permanent Artillery units. Permanent Force officers and N.C.O's were allotted 
to all districts from November to March 31, 1921, and very considerable impetus 
was given towards effecting reorganization of Artillery unite. A considerable amount 
of training at local headquarters or armouries was done during this period. 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 41 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

For financial reasons training at 80 per cent strength has been authorized and 
restricted to six daye at local headquarters, or under canvas, where this doee not 
entail transport by rail. In addition arrangements have been made for all unite to 
carry out four days' practice at the nearest artillery practice camp. Limited Gun 
Detachments are being sent in order to save expense, the Permanent Force units 
supplying guns, equipment, horses and drivers. 

Establishments 

Provisional Peace Establishments for Field, Heavy, Siege and Garrison Artil- 
lery have been compiled and approved. 

Equipment Regulations 

Equipment Regulations for Q.F. IS-pr., 4-5-inch Howitzer, B.L. 60-pr. and 
6-inch Howitzer Batteries have been compiled in concert with the branch of the 
Quartermaster-General. 

General 

A complete history of all Canadian 'Corps guns and carriages received from 
England has been compiled. 

Considerable difficulty and delay has been experienced in compiling establish- 
ments, regvilations and issue of equipment generally owing to the deliberations of 
Post War Committees (Imperial) regarding the future organization and scale of 
equipment, based on lessons gained during the late war. 



Report of Work Carried Out by the Survey Division 

General 

Survey work was carried out in Ontario, Quebec and Cape Breton. In Ontario 
control surveys were completed of six new sheets, Alliston, Barrie, Beaverton, Grand 
Bend, St. Mary's and Stratford. These six districts are now ready for the topogra- 
phers. The firet three, surrounding Camp Borden, were undertaken for the use of 
the Air Force. The control of the Alliston sheet was plotted to two inches to one 
mile, and sent to the Air Board for use in experimental mapping work from air 
photographs. 

In Quebec and Cape Breton topograpliy was carried out of districts of which 
the control had been completed previously. 

The drafting of the standard one-inch maps has not been as large as usual owing 
to the increased amount of other work required of the draughtsmen. 

The publication and distribution of topographic maps, diagrams and lantern 
plates continues to increase, and is now taxing the capacity of the small printing 
staff. An assistant transferer and prover and a press feeder are urgently required. 

Field Work 

Control. — Horizontal and vertical control work was carried out and completed 
in the AUiston, Barrie and Beaverton sheets near Camp Borden. Vertical control 
(levelling) of about 80 miles of road was completed in the Aston sheet, Quebec, and 
555 miles in the St. Mary's and Stratford sheets. 

A motor-truck was used for the first time on this work to transport men and 
camp outfit. As compared with horse transport it is cheaper, saves much time in 



42 DEPARTMEyr OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 

12 GEORGE V^ A. 1922 

carrying the men further and faster from camp to work, and thus permits of fewer 
changes of camp. Where roads are at all passable motor transport is to be preferred 
from nearly every point of view. 

Miles 

Chain transit lines 488 

Stadia transit lines 680 

Stations occupied 3,424 

Total levelling 1,895 

Topography. — In Nova 'Scotia about 15 square miles were finished in the 
Uniacke sheet, completing the Halifax district. About 400 square miles of topo- 
graphy in the Sydney district were left uncompleted from last season, and though 
work was continued till January 15, 70 square miles remain to finish the Mira sheet. 

In Quebec three sheets were completed. Three Rivers, Tamaska and Ashton, 
and a portion of Becancour. 

The total area of topography completed during the season was about 1,600 square 
miles. 

The present condition of the field work is as follows: — 

Districts fully controlled (430 square miles each) ready for the topographers : — 

In Ontario, six: Grand Bend, St. ilarys, Stratford, Alliston, Barrie and 
Beaverton. 

In Quebec four : Lotbiniere, St. Sylvestre, Arthabaska and Thetf ord. 

Drafting. — The Orleans, Sydney, Quebec, Portneuf, Sherbrooke and Sambro 
one inch sheets were completed, as well as the engraving of the Kingston half inch. 

The sheets now in hand are Halifax, Chezzetcook, Musquodoboit, Uniacke in 
Kova Scotia; St. Malachie, Quebec, and engraving of the Brome half inch. 

Besides the above standard work the draughtsmen were employed for about ten 
man months on work for the Second Volume War Xarrative and six inch War Game 
maps. A draughtsman was also employed at the Historical Section for three and one 
half months for special work. 

Printing. — The following new sheets were published: — 

Orleans, Quebec, Portneuf, Sherbrooke, 1" sheets ; Sydney, N.W., 

2"; Kingston, J"; two Index maps Total 5,296 

Reprints of eleven maps were published Total 5,198 

Seventeen large scale Artillery diagrams were produced Total 540 

Other maps and diagrams : Battlefields Memorial, Siege Railway 
Map, Royal Military College, Three Examination Maps, 
Royal Military College Grounds, Diagrams for Historical 

Section Total 2,965 

For War Narrative Section, 1,500 copies of 19 maps Total 28,500 

Lantern plates Total 557 

Blue-prints Total 373 

Total maps and diagrams printed 42,499 

Lantern plates 557 

Blue-prints 373 

Maps Issued. — The demand for one inch and half inch maps continues to increase 
the total issue for all purposes having been 10,220; 7,529 free to various Governmenr 
Departments and 2,691 sold to the public. 

Various diagrams and special maps 3,505 

Total maps and diagrams issued 13,725 



DKI'MtTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 43 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF PAY SERVICES, FOR THE FISCAL 
YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1921 

General Remarks 

The period included in the last report ending March 31, 1920, saw the eoinpletion 
of demobilization of the Canadian Expeditionary Force, with the exception of those 
who were employed in winding up outstanding questions in connection with the war. 

The period of the present report covers the transition from a war to a peace 
footing, and it may be said that by March 31, 1921, in so far as this Branch is con- 
cerned, the winding up of financial matters in connection with the War period had 
been brought almost to a conclusion. 

In recognition of the work performed by the Canadian Army Pay Corps during 
the war, His Majesty the King was pleased to confer the title " Royal " on the Corps, 
which is now known as " The Royal Canadian Army Pay Coi-ps ". 

The reorganization of this Corps, foreshadowed in the last report, was efiected 
early in the year, the appointment of officers taking effect from May 1, 1920, and of 
the other ranks from July 1, 1920. 

For some time, owing to the volume of work, it was necessary to retain the 
service of C.E.F. personnel to assist the R.C.A.P.C. personnel, but by the end of the 
year practically all the non-permanent military personnel had been demobilized, and 
any additional personnel etill required were employed in a civilian capacity. 

In April, 1920, the Deputy Minister and the General Auditor of the Overseas 
Military Forces of Canada proceeded to England for the purpose of arriving at, so 
far as was possible, a final settlement of all accounts in connection with the adminis- 
tration of the Overseas Forces. They were accompanied by the Accounting Officer 
of the O.M.F.C. Pay Section, with the necessary data and information regarding the 
accounts between the two Governments. 

Although numerous financial transactions took place between the departments of 
the overseas forces and the various Imperial departments, the large majority were 
matters connected with the War Office, with which department these transactions 
aggregated between eighty-five and one hundred million pounds sterling. 

It was found possible to arrive at a final settlement with the War Ofiice, covering 
all matters of a financial nature between that office and the Ministry, O.M.F.C, up to 
May 31, 1920. This settlement was confirmed by Order in Council of February 16, 
1921 (P.C. 408). 

While during the war the accounts of the Overseas Forces were kept up to date, 
and partial settlements were effected from time to time, had no final settlement been 
reached, as above described, the winding up of the above accounts would have 
necessitated a large staff on both sides for a considerable period, to examine into 
the comijosition of the individual detailed accounts which would arise. 

Following upon the conclusion of the negotiations with the War Office, which 
were carried out in May and June, 1920, the Ministry, Overseas Forces, ceased to 
function on July 31, 1920. After that date the late Chief of the General Staff, 
O.M.F. of C. and the late Deputy Paymaster General, O.M.F. of C, became 
responsible for dealing with all questions which might arise in connection with the 
administration Overseas (Order in Council P.C. 1705 of 1920). The O.M.F.G. 
Pay Section continued to function under their direction until November 30, 1920, 
when it was found possible to finally close out that Section and to absorb any out- 
standing matters into the Pay Organization of the Department of Militia and 
Defence. 



44 DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

The small Pay Detachment, referred to in previous report, which it was found 
necessary to continue in England, carried on there until March 31, 1921, when it was 
found possible to close that office, and to arrange for any necessary work to be dealt 
with through tlie office of the High Commissioner. On the closing of that office the 
Pay Department, Overseas, which had necessarily grown to large dimensions during 
the war, ceased to exist. 

In April, 1920, Brigadier-General J. G. Langton, who held the appointment of 
Paymaster General in Canada during the strenuous period of demobilization, was 
granted leave prior to retirement, and the Director of Pay Services (formerly the 
Deputy Paymaster General, Overseas) became responsible for the administration 
of the Pay Services in Canada. 

At the end of the period covered by this report, the work of th,e Pay Services falls 
conveniently into two main divisions, as under : — 

(1) The section dealing with the Pay Services for the reconstituted P<_>rmanent 
and Non-Permanent Active ililitia. 

(2) The section dealing with questions arising out of the adjustment of the 
accounts of ex-members of the C.E.F. 

The following supplementary reports are submitted in connection with the work 
which may he considered under these two divisions : — 

(1) 
Permanent and Non-Permanent Active Militia 

Administration 

The work in connection with the pay of the Permanent and Non-Permanent 
Active Militia is carried out by the personnel of the R.C.A.P.C., under the juris- 
diction of the Director of Pay Services, small staffs under a Senior Officer Pay 
Services being employed at the Headquarters of each Military Distrct. 

At the time the Corps was reorganized, provision was made for a sufficient 
number of officers and other ranks to efficiently carry out pay duties for the force 
which was then proposed. Owing to modification of the original proposals it was 
possible to operate upon a Limited Establishment, although the duties for the period 
under review were considerably greater than might be anticipated in peace time, due 
to the reorganization of the entire force, and the work still arising as an aftermath 
of the war. 

In carrying out these duties, as already explained, the Permanent personnel were 
assisted by certain officers of the C.E.F., who were retained in a temporary capacity, and 
at the date on which this report closes it is possible to anticipate that the following 
year will see the final demobilization of all the officers temporarily retained, and a 
further possible reduction of the number of officers of the R.C.A.P.C., which will place 
the Corps substantially upon a pre-war basis. 

Due partly to the fact that the work of reconstitution of the Permanent Active 
Militia was not completed until about the middle of the year, the volume of work in 
connection therewith continued to be heavy. 

Eevised Pay and Allowance Regulations were published with effect from March 1, 
1920, and while substantially satisfactory, it was found necessary to introduce numerous 
amendments and alterations to conform to practical conditions and this necessitated a 
good deal of extra work. 

In order to conform to the requirements of the Auditor General, the system of 
accounting for disbursements to troops in Canada by means of pay lists was again 
put into effect. This system had been discontinued during the war, but was considered 
the most satisfactory method of accounting in time of peace. 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 45 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 39 

Considerable work was thrown on the District and Headquarters Pay Staffs through 
the necessity of compiling Pay Lists for the fiscal year 1920-21, which had n-ot been 
made up in the regular way due to the changes introduced during the war. This work 
was carried on in conjunction with the current work which had to be kept up to date. 

The preparation and drafting of new forms to conform to the revised Pay and 
Allowance Regulations was found necessary, and was carried out during the year 
under review. 

A system of audit of Pay Lists somewhat similar to pre-war arrangements was 
instituted at Militia Headquarters, so as to effect a thorough check upon the disburse- 
ments to the Permanent troops, and to constitute a proper safeguard for public funds. 

Consequent upon the reorganization of the Permanent Active Militia, a much 
larger number of officers and soldiers were retired or discharged to pension than would 
normally be the ease, necessitating considerable work in connection with the computa- 
tion of pensions. ■ 

The introduction of the new Pay Regulations, the many changes in personnel and 
the conditions following upon the war necessitated the reference to Headquarters of 
many questions which could not be decided in the Districts, thus largely increasing 
the work of the Headquarters Pay Staff. 

Aecou7its Militia Headquarters 

On reorganization of the Corps, the title " Assistant Director of Pay Services 
(Accounts)" referred to in previous report was abolished, and the various District Pay 
Offices, including the Paymaster Militia Headquarters, now account for funds received 
under the direction of the Director of Pay Services to the Chief Accountant of the 
Department of Militia and Defence. 

The Paymaster, Militia Headquarters, for the year under review, has been 
responsible for disbursements on the following accounts : — 

(a) Payment of all pay and allowances for military personnel employed at Militia 

Headquarters. 
(6) Payments in liquidation of the estates of deceased officers, warrant officers 

and men. 

(c) Disbursements in connection with the Petawawa Training Camp. 

(d) Payments of adjustments of pay and allowances in the accounts of ex- 
members of the C.E.F. 

During the period April 1, 1920, to March 31, 1921, the Paymaster, Militia Head- 
quarters, issued 22,098 cheques, amounting to $2,137,150.30, on the following 
accounts: Pay and Allowances, Headquarters Personnel; War Service Gratuity; Pay 
Adjustment Account; Estates; Petawawa Camp. 

District Pay Staffs 

During the year under review the work iu the District Pay .Offices has been heavy, 
for the reasons previously indicated in this report. 

On the reorganization of the R.CA.P.C. the appointments of Senior Officers Pay 
Services in the various Districts were filled by officers of the Corps, and as the Pay 
Staffs in each District are very small it was necesssary to exercise the greatest care in 
the distribution of the personnel, having in view local and other conditions. 

Early in the year all war and demobilization pay records, files, ledger sheets, etc., 
were transferred from the District Pay Offices to Militia Headquarters, so as to 
centralize the work, and all claims and inquiries in connection with matters apper- 
taining to the C.E.F. were then dealt with from Militia Headquarters. This transfer 
of documents, etc., entailed considerable work in the Districts, but was carried out 
satisfactorily. 

During the year the District Pay Staffs were greatly reduced, and by the end of the 
year the services of nearly all the temporary personnel had been dispensed with. 



46 DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AXD DEFENCE 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

The undermentioned financial statements, included in Appendix B, covering the 
fiscal year ending March 31, 1921, will show the expenditure in each District in connec- 
tion with the Permanent and Non-Permanent Active Militia: — 

(1) Allowances paid to Active Militia in the various Districts. 

(2) Showing Expenditure by Stations on account of Pay and Allowances of the 
Permanent Force. 

(3) Statement of Expenditure on account of Pay and Allowances of Officers and 
Warrant Officers of the Permanent Force. 

(4) Statement of Expenditure on account of Pay and Allowances of Officers and 
Warrant Officers of the Permanent Force with details of expenditure by 
Stations. 

(5) iStatement of Expenditure on account of Pay and Allowances of X.C.O's 
and men of the Permanent Force. 

(6) Statement of expenditure on account of Pay and Allowances of N.C.O's and 
men of the Permanent Force with details of expenditure by Stations. 

Stores Aiidit 

Audit of ledger and stock accounts of Ordnance and other receiving and distribut- 
ing depots accounting for militia stores, clothing and necessaries for use of the Depart- 
ment of Militia and Defence, and ledger accounts of officers receiving stores and 
clothing from the depots to equip the troops, have been carried out during the period 
under review. 

Stock and ledger accounts audited are as follows (clothing accounts Permanent 
Force monthly, all other accoimts annually) : Ordnance Depots, Engineer Stores, Arma- 
ment Stores, Barrack Stores, Mechanical Transport Stores, Water Transport Stores, 
Medical Stores, Veterinary Stores, Artillery Equipment Accounts. Clothing and 
Equipment Accounts, Permanent Units; Clothing and Equipment Accounts, Non- 
Permanent Units; Clothing and Equipment Accounts, Royal Military College; Ammu- 
nition and Small Arms Accoimts, Eifle Associations; Equipment and Ammunition 
Accounts, Cadet Corps. 

Value of stores and clothing recovered during period 1.4.20 to 31.3.21, as result 
of Stores Audit Observations on the above accounts — $71,974.86. 

(2) 

Canadian Expeditionary Force 

This Section, known as that of the Assistant Director Pay Services (Demobili- 
zation), deals with the following: — 

(1) War Service Gratuity. 

(2) Pay and Allowances, Separation Allowance and Assigned Pay. 

(3) Working Pay.' 

(4) War Loan, and Refund Transportation to soldiers' dependents returning 
from Overseas. 

(5) Accounting Section. 

(6) Voucher and Pay Library. 

(1) War Service Gratuity. 

War Service Gratuity Subsection is divided as follows : — 

(a) War Service Gratuity to Ex-Members of the C.E.F. and their dependents. 

Adjustments under this head are being made on belated applications, and also 
on claims from soldiers' dependents where the ex-soldier on demobilization did not 
make application on their behalf. In addition to actual adjustments made, consider- 
able investigation and correspondence are entailed regarding the many claims on 
which no adjustment is found to be due. 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 47 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

(6) Gratuity to dependents of members of the C.E.F., who were killed or died 
in the service, and to the dependents of Canadians who were killed or died 
during service with His Majesty's Forces. 

Claims for settlement under this head are mainly from the dependents of 
Canadians who were killed or died on service with the Imperial Forces. With few 
exceptions in the case of dependents of Members of the C.E.F., it has been possible 
to effect settlement from reference to the records of this department and of the Board 
of Pension Commissioners, without the necessity of obtaining individual applications. 

(c) War Service Gratuity to ex-members of His Majesty's Forces (and their 
dependents) who were domiciled in Canada prior to the war, and who, after 
discharge from such forces, became resident and domiciled in Canada. 

Applications under this heading were still being received at March 31, 1921, at 
an average rate of eight daily. Special investigation is necessary in these cases. 
Confirmation of service in His Majesty's Forces, and of the amount of gratuity paid 
from Imperial funds, has to be obtained from overseas. In many cases also it is 
necessary to investigate the eligibility of the soldier's dependent. 

During the period under review War Service Gratuity was paid to 24,765 indi- 
viduals, involving an expenditure of $4,539,019.68. 

During the year the War Service Gratuity Subsection handled approximately 
73,000 individual files, and approximately 56,000 letters were written in connection 
therewith. 

(2) Pay and Allowances, Separation Allowance and Assigned Pay. 

This Subsection deals with all claims for adjustment on account of Pay and 
Allowances, Separation Allowance and Assigned Pay of ex-soldiers of the C.E.F. for 
service overseas or in Canada during the war. 

During the fiscal year, this Subsection handled approximately 60,000 files, and 
wrote approximately 44,000 letters in connection therewith. Payments in connection 
with adjustment of Pay and Allowances, Separation Allowance and Assigned Pay 
were made through this Section, totalling $166,601.90. 

(3) Working Pay. 

This Subsection deals with adjustment of Working Pay for personnel of different 
Units. Some difliculty has been experienced in obtaining the necessary evidence 
properly to adjust claims, and as a result considerable correspondence was entailed. 

During the year 1,800 claims were received, one-third of which were found to be 
admissible under the regulations. 

During the period under review this Subsection handled approximately 2,000 
files, and wrote approximately 3,500 letters in connection therewith. 

(4) War Loan and Refund of Transportation. 

This Subsection collected and transmitted to the Finance Department all moneys 
subscribed for Victory Loan by Soldiers in Canada, and members of the Militia 
Department, during the years 1917-18-19. 

During the year under review 68 requisitions for bonds were made to the Depart- 
ment of Finance, and 387 refunds were made on account of uncompleted subscriptions. 

This Subsection also investigates claims for refund of transportation on account 
of the return of soldiers' dependents from overseas. 

During the year ending March 31, 1921, 1,047 claims were authorized for pay- 
ment. 

(5) Accounts. 

This Subsection issues cheques for War Service Gratuity, Separation Allowance 
and Assigned Pay, on the authority of the Subsection which investigates the claim. 



48 DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

In this Subsection the cheques are written, audited and mailed. 

Overpayments and classification of debit balances are also dealt with by this 
Subsection. 

For the fiscal year ending March 31, 1921, the following transactions were 

effected : — 

Number of Canadian War Service Gratuity cheques mailed.. .. 6.275 

Number of Imperial War Service Gratuity cheques mailed.. .. 30,449 

Nximber of Dependent War Service Gratuity cheques mailed.. .. 14.494 

Number of S.A. & A. P. cheques mailed 2.141 

Total number of cheques mailed 53.359 

Number of letters despatched as ordinary mail 139,136 

Number of letters despatched as registered mail 7,132 

Number of cheques despatched as registered mail 53.359 

Total number of letters and cheques mailed 199,627 

Number of letters traced 219 

Number of files passed through Section 91,066 

(6) Voucher and Pay Library. 

This Subsection was established to take care of all the vouchers supporting 
disbursements made through the Department of the Paymaster General, O.M.F.C., 
and supporting disbursements in connection with the C.E.F. in Canada. 

It is difficult to convey an idea of the volume and the variety of documents 
which are being sorted, filed and arranged in this Subsection. 

Over 2,000 packing cases were required to ship the documents from England to 
Canada, occupying an estimated space of 16,000 cubic feet, and weighing approxi- 
mately 325 tons. 

Approximately 60,000,000 separate vouchers support the disbursements made 
through the Department of the Paymaster General, O.M.F.C, including over 5,000,000 
cheques, 20,000,000 Acquittance Rolls supporting payments to the soldiers in England 
and the Field, and 35,000,000 vouchers supporting payments on Miscellaneous 
accounts. 

It is estimated tliat a total of 25,000,000 paid cheques have been lodged in this 
Subsection to be filed for ready reference. 

It is essential that the documents and vouchers referred to, supporting financial 
disbursements of every kind, in connection with the war, should be filed and arranged 
so as to be available for reference at any time, as it is very frequently found necessary 
to refer to these vouchers in dealing with claims or complaints received from 
ex-members of the forces. 

File Subsection 

During the year a large number of files and other documents were received from 
the Military Districts, and overseas, for amalgamation and filing with the records 
held here. 

Over 333,000 files and 190,000 Last Pay Certificates from the Districts, and 
410,000 files and 160,000 Last Pay Certificates from overseas were dealt with, in 
addition to filling the daily requisitions for files. 

These requisitions showed a steady decline from month to month — the number 
in April, 1920, being 44,039, falling to 19,050 in January, 1921; the total requisitions 
for the year being 292,539. In addition, 110,974 letters were received in this Sub- 
section for filing and passing to the appropriate division for further action. 

In March, 1921, the files of this Subsection were transferred to the Records 
Directorate, over 200 tons of documents and 1,240 cabinets being handed over. 

Pay Ledger Subsection 

During the year various Ledger Sheets (Pay, S.A. & A.P., etc.) covering the 
accounts of each individual soldier, were being steadily amalgamated, so that the 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 49 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

full details of each account should be readily accessible. The Ledger Sheets filed 
by this Subsection comprised the following: — 

Overseas Ledger sheets 870,742 



District 

Separation Allowance and Assigned Pay 

War Service Gratuity and Post Discharge Pay.. 

Dependents' War Service Gratuity 

Clearing Services Command 

Casualty Paymaster 

War Loan 

Insurance 

Siberian 

Canadian Military Police Corps 

Special Remittance 



391.440 

1,011,764 

81,517 

19,329 

2,428 

43,849 

2,240 

701 

8,115 

920 

22,000 

2,455,105 

In addition the Subsection filled requisitions made by other Subsections which 
required the ledger sheets for investigation, to the number of 87,.377. These documents 
were also transferred to the Records Directorate in March, 1921. 

Officers' Pay Section 

This Subsection has been operated separately from the Section of the Assistant 
Director Pay Services (Demobilization), and the work performed is similar to that 
carried out by the Pay and Allowances, Separation Allowance and Assigned Pay 
Subsection previously referred to. 

The Subsection deals with inquiries, complaints or questions regarding the pay 
accounts of officers, respecting their period of service with the forces during the war. 
Any questions arising in this connection are found to be almost invariably of a com- 
plicated nature involving careful investigation and considerable research work. 

By March 31, 1921, the work was considerably reduced, but a substantial number 
of •claims were still being received for consideration. 

During the fiscal year ending March 31, 1921, approximately 8,000 letters were 
despatched by this Subsection, in connection with which it was necessary to refer to 
approximately 30,000 files. 

Regimental and Canteen Funds 

In connection with this report it may be of interest to refer briefly to the disposal 
of the Kegimental Funds of units which served overseas. 

In the case of those units with territorial affiliation, arrangements were made 
for the transfer of Regimental Funds to local ti'ustees appointed by the units, for 
administration imder trust deeds executed by the units under the arrangements 
approved by the Governor in Council. Approximately $580,000 was transferred in 
this manner. 

On demobilization the Regimental Funds of those units which had no territorial 
connection, having been raised in England or in France, were transferred to the 
Paymaster General, O.M.F.C., to be held " in trust," and these funds (which amounted 
to approximately $300,000) were subsequently transferred to Canada. 

In April, 1920, as it was anticipated that it would be some time before these 
funds were finally disposed of, and in order that a substantial rate of interest might 
be obtained, war bonds were purchased to the value of $250,000. 

In the month of March, 1921, these bonds, and the balance of accumulated funds 
aggregating $56,322.01, were transferred to the custody of the Finance Department, 
to be held with the Canadians' share of the profits from the Expeditionary Force 
Canteens in France and the Army Canteens in Great Britain, until the final disposi- 
tion of such funds is decided. 



36- 



50 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 

12 GEORGE V. A. 1922 



EEPOET OF THE CHIEF ACCOUNTANT FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 
ENDING MARCH 31, 1921 

Expenditure 

That portion of the expenditure for 1920-21 attributable to the war, shows a 
marked decrease from that of the previous year, which contained the bulk of 
demobilization expenditure, and was consequently very heavy. On the other hand the 
Militia expenditure for 1920-21 has increased over 1919-20, owing mainly to the 
partial reorganization of the non-permanent units of the Militia and the recruiting 
up to strength of the Permanent Force. The same remarks apply to revenue funds, 
and other credits. 

The following comparative tables indicate the extent of these differences: — 

War 

Militia Votes Appropriation Total 

1919-20 $ 4,634,aH; $323,360,987 $327,995,503 

1920-21 10,058,625 16,229,764 26,288,389 

•$5,424,109 t$307,131,223 t$301,707,114 

•Increase. fDecrease. 

CREDITS 

War 

Revenue Militia Votes Appropriation Total 

1919-20 $194,820 12 $ 83,230 67 $7,776,333 74 $8,054,384 53 

1920-21 277,308 93 229,828 27 5,554,191 63 6,061,328 83 

•$ 82,488 81 •$146,597 60 t$2,222,142 11 t$l, 993,055 70 

•Increase fDecrease. 

Number of deposit receipts to Keceiver General received and taken to 

account, 1919-20 18,042 

Number of deposit receipts to Receiver General received and taken to 

account, 1920-21 14,506 

The following statements of expenditure and revenue will be found in Appendix 
A:— 

(1) Appropriation Accounts Militia Votes, 1920-21. 

(2) Militia Revenue, 1920-21. 

(3) Comparative statement of expenditure for ten years from 1911-12 to 1920-21. 

(4) Expenditure on account of Demobilization Appropriation, 1920-21. 

(5) Expenditure on account of War and Demobilization Appropriations, August, 
1914, to March 31, 1921. 

Volume of Work 

The above figures alone do not give an accurate indication of the volume of work, 
owing to the fact that a great deal of subsequent work is necessary in connection with 
expenditure for previous years. 

As an instance, interest on the value of all goods sold or services rendered to or 
on behalf of the Imperial Government involves a computation on each individual 
detailed entry in these accounts from the date the service was rendered to the date of 
final settlement. These accounts aggregate some eighteen millions of dollars. 

The adjustment of accounts after the war is a slow process, and particularly 60 
with those rendered against other Governments, as in most of such cases adjustments 



UEI'AUTilEXT OF MILITIA AND DliFEKVE 51 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

have to be effected by correspondence. Some of the larger accounts are tho.sc against 
the Imperial Government for Royal Air Force, Siberian E.xpedition, Polish Falcons, 
Chinese Coolies, etc., running into many millions. The British Ministry of Shipping 
have rendered statements of account against Canada for ocean transportation of the 
Canadian troops on demobilization, aggregating about eighteen million dollars, on 
which payments have been made of fourteen million dollars, the balance being with- 
held pending audit of vouchers in detail. 

Large quantities of sui-plus stores have been sold ; this branch being responsible 
for the collections and the necessary book-keeping and correspondence. The total 
proceeds of sales for the year on this account were $3,258,250.71. 

Many other accounts are still to be settled, so that a considerable further period 
will be required before the work of this bi'anch returns to its noi-mal proportions and 
the staff can be reduced accordingly. 

Transport and Freight Claims 

Order in Council P.C. 179 and amending orders provide for the refund of 
passage money to soldiers' dependents returning from overseas, and cover some 17,000 
persons estimated to have about 12,000 claims, of which 8,087 claims have been paid. 
Claims are being received and dealt with promptly. 

During the year railway accounts were numerous and for large amounts, owing 
chiefly to demobilization and to reorganization and transfers of station of units of the 
Permanent Force. Claims are usually three or four months in arrears in being ren- 
dered. The outstanding accounts with all the railway lines March 31, 1921, aggregated 
$140,808.52. 

The steamship accounts of the individual lines have been reduced to compara- 
tively small proportions. There is, however, the account for ocean transportation with 
the British Ministry of Shipping, above mentioned, totalling slightly under eighteen 
million dollars, on which payments of over fourteen million dollars have been made. 
Before the balance is paid it will be necessary for an auditor to go to London and 
audit the detailed accounts, which the British Ministry of Shipping are holding there 
for inspection. 

Claims for loss and damage to shipments are continually made, and are followed 
up to insure that satisfactory settlement is received in due course. 

Becoverahle Accounts 

During the period under review, in addition to recoverable accounts amounting 
to $6,102,405.72 having been dealt with as indicated below, the efforts of this section 
were mainly directed in answering audit observations, and supplying additional parti- 
culars respecting items in accounts previously rendered. This work involved careful 
research of documents and paylists and considerable correspondence. 

Amounts debited to Imperial Government by transfer through the Department of 
Finance, which operates a reciprocal account with the Imperial Treasury: — 

Royal Air Force $ 455,220 52 

Imperial Naval Account 2,963 55 

Serbian account 30134 

Chinese coolies 507,252 54 

Siberian account ' 4,020,797 02 

Mechanical Transport 48,316 88 

Montenegrin Reservists 66,940 67 

Railway construction 261,746 85 

$ 5,303,539 37 
Other recoverable accounts 738,866 35 

$6,102,405 72 
36-4J 



52 DEPARTMEXT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

The amount of payments actually received, exclusive of advices of payments to 
Finance Department, on behalf of this department, totalled $1,032,010.06. 

The undernoted accounts were rendered during the year but were outstanding 
and in course of adjustment as at March 31, 1921: — 

Australian Government ? 320 13 

Chinese Coolies 1,600 00 

Czecho-SIovaks 38,499 09 

Polish account 704,849 92 

Imperial pension account 114,895 83 

Imperial Naval 43 42 

Internment operations 96 23 

Indian Affairs 24,630 00 

Imperial War Graves Commission 6,258 03 

Mesopotamia Engineers 27 SO 

Naval Service 3,200 00 

New Zealand Government 327 50 

Newfoundland Government 7,135 12 

Pension Commissioners 2 32 

Royal Air Force 156.069 87 

Russian Government 55,608 07* 

St. Lucia account 35,016 33 

United States Government 16391 

$1,148,743 57 

•Account rendered in July, 1915, and resubmitted to High Commissioner during 1920-21, 
owing to reports that present Government might assume the liability of the late Imperial 
Russian Government. 

Mechanical Book-keeping Machines 

During the fiscal year 1920-21, a careful investigation was made into the merits 
of mechanical book-keeping machines, and their adaptability to cerain classes of 
departmental book-keeping. As a result of this investigation, two ledger posting 
machines were purchased mainly for use in connection with the recording, in a com- 
prehensive manner, of the expenditure under the diilerent votes. The installation of 
these machines has resulted in the saving of the salaries of two employees, as prior to 
the war the accounting work now done with the machines required the services of four 
clerks. In addition, the entries are now proved daily and the total expenditure under 
any vote in any district, as well as the total expenditure under any vote for all dis- 
tricts, is available at any time. Under the old system the latter was not obtainable, 
without considerable trouble and delay, except at the close of a month. 

These machines have also been used in conjunction with the addressograph 
installed in the previous year, in the compilation of pay lists for the Permanent Civil 
Staff, and in posting the individual pay accounts of the Permanent Civil Staff of the 
department. 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 
SESSIONAL PyWER No. 39 



53 



EEPORT OF THE ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER FOR THE FISCAL 
YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1921 

Submitted herewith is a report on the work of the Eegistration Office, and the 
Printing, Stationery and Contingencies Division: 

Registration Office 





1919-20 


1920-21 


Decrease 
Central 
Registry 




Central 
Registry 


Overseas 
Section (a) 


Central 
Registry 


Overseas 
Section 




681,800 
1,089,021 


3.525 
293,439 
393,097 


523,629 
871,871 


64,150 

541,073 

633,885 

498 

143. 8S9 

60,000 


158,171 


Incoming files recorded or passed 

Filps handled but not issued . ... 


217,150 




561,000 
59,361 


398,814 
51,932 


162, 186 




171,490 


7,429 
















Total iiles handled 


2,391,182 


861,551 


1,846,246 


1,443,495 


544,936 







(a) The Overseas Section, which was organized to deal with correspondence files created by 
the Overseas Military Forces of Canada, overseas, only commenced operations on September 
8. 1919. 

(b) The special files dealing with the Estates of deceased soldiers are being amalgamated, 
for convenience, with the general correspondence files relating to these soldiers. 



Printing, Stationery and Contingencies Division 

Statistical statement showing work and expenditure by the Printing, Stationery 
and Contingencies Division: — 



1919-20 



1920-21 



Increase 

or 
Decrease 



Printing Requisitions, issued 

Stationery Requisitions issued 

Proceeds of sales of military books 

Expenditure for Printing 

Expenditure for stationery 

Express & Freight 



764 

2,172 

$ 150 27 

147,664 09 

181.310 84 

9,001 42 



526 

1,527 

38 OS 

69,665 41 

59,479 57 

7,571 76 



238 dec. 

645 dec. 

$. Ill 59 dec. 

77,998 68 dco. 

121,831 27 dec. 

1,429 68 dec. 



54 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 

12 GEOBGE V A. 1922 



APPENDIX A 

The following are statements for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1921, showing: 

1. Appropriation accounts, 1920-21. 

2. Militia and Defence revenue. 

3. Comparative etatement of expenditure for the ten years, 1911-12 to 1920-21. 

4. Demobilization appropriation expenditure 1920-21. 

5. Expenditure ou account of war and demobilization appropriations, August, 

1914, to March 31, 1921. 

Statement No. 1 — Appropriation Accounts 1920-21 



Appropriation 



Amount of 
Grant 



Kxoenditure 



Grant 
Unused 



Grant 
Exceeded 



Allowances, Active Militia 

Annual drill 

Cadet Services 

Clothing and necessaries. ... - 

Contingencies 

Customs dues 

Departmental Librar.v 

Dominion Arsenal, Lindsay 

Dominion Arsenal, Quebec 

Engineer Services and Works 

Grants to associations and bands 

Headquarters and district staffs 

Maintenance of military properties 

Ordnance arms, lands, etc 

Permanent Force 

Printing and stationery 

Royal Military College 

Salaries and wages 

Schools of Instruction 

Topographic Surveys 

Transport and freight 

Training Areas 

Warlike stores 

Special Votes — 

Battlefields Memorials, Kos. 325 and 552. 

Gratuities. Nos. 391 and 467 

Civil Pensions, No. 390 

Total Militia Expenditures 

Demobilization appropriation 

Total 

Special account — Regimental funds 



120. 

1..500, 

390, 

60, 

50, 

50, 

1, 

258, 

.532. 

705, 

105, 

345, 

200, 

100, 

6,500, 

70 

319 

331, 

150 

45, 

300, 

.30, 

400, 



» cts 
000 00 
000 00 
000 00 
000 00 
000 00 
000 00 
000 00 
112 00 
512 00 
000 00 
000 00 
600 00 
000 00 
000 00 
000 00 
000 00 
819 00 
463 00 
000 00 
000 00 
000 00 
000 00 
000 00 



260,000 00 
6,129 78 
1,115 42 



$ cts 

75,418 04 

481,027 13 

230,288 23 

31,410 92 

38,461 22 

19, 788 40 

846 21 

174, .349 54 

463,073 26 

575.518 16 

64.535 69 

292,830 96 

221,046 5 

69,596 97 

5,705,735 .53 

75.205 75 

321,308 94 

291.741 48 

21,958 07 

45, 124 99 

315.442 90 

10,611 90 

361,303 13 

161,756 21 
6, 129 78 
1.115 42 



$ cts 

44,581 96 
1,018,972 87 

159,711 77 

28,589 08 

11,538 78 

30,211 60 

153 79 

83,762 46 

69,438 74 

129,481 84 

40,464 31 

52, 769 04 



30,403 03 
794,264 47 



39,721 52 
128,011 93 



19,388 10 
38,696 87 

95,243 79 



12,830,751 20 
38,250,900 00 



10,0.58,625 40 
16,229,764 45 



2,815,435 95 
22,021,135 55 



51,081,651 20 



26,288,389 85 
5,081 91 



21,836,571 50 



$ cts. 



21,046 57 



5,205 75 
1,489 94 



124 99 
15,442 90 



43,310 15 



43,310 15 



Properties Sold 


Balance of 

proceeds of 

sale brought 

forward from 

1919-20 


Expenditure 
1920-21 


Balance of 
proceeds of 
sale to be 
carried for- 
wardto 1921-22 




$ ets. 
,*2,144 14 
19,783 10 
62.947 27 


$ cts. 
144 15 

Nil 
Nil 


$ cts. 
1,999 99 




19,783 10 


Fort Osborne Barracks Site, Winnipeg 


62,947 27 








84,874 51 


144 15 


84, 730 36 



♦$1,999.99 omitted from 1919-20 statement. 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 39 

Statement No. 2. — Revenue, 1920-21 

Advertisements } 198 7B 

Sales of ammunition 099 94 

Sales of stores and clothing (not including surplus war stores) .... 25,2.35 35 

Sales of books and maps 2,888 23 

Sales of cast horses 4,456 00 

Sales of military properties (old buildings, etc.) 8,963 90 

Rents of military properties 16,390 23 

Receipts for barrack damages 675 90 

Discharges by purchase 13,029 18 

Refunds in respect of previous year's expenditure 7,597 51 

Insurance re loss of S.S. Berjil 5,136 88 

Medals and ribbons 18 51 

$ 85,290 38 

Pensions, 1901 Act, deductions 120,386 47 

Royal Military College, Cadet tecs and supplies 70,107 39 

$275,784 24 

Conscience money 1380 

Premium discount and exchange 1,364 08 

Interest on deposit at Bank Montreal, London, Eng 146 81 



55 



$277,308 93 



56 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 



12 GEORGE V. A. 1922 






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57 



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58 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 



12 GEORGE V A. 1922 



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60 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 



12 GEORGE V. A. 1922 



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DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 61 

StSSIONAL PAPER No. 36 



APPEKDIX B 

The following are statements for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1920, showing : 
1. Allowances paid to the Active Militia in the various districts. 

•2. Statement of expenditure, by stations, on account of pay and allowances of the 
Permanent Force. 

3. Statement of expenditure on account of pay and allowances of Officers and 
Warrant Officers of the Permanent Force. 

4. Statement of expenditure on account of pay and allowances of Officers and 
Warrant Officers of the Permanent Force, with details of expenditure, by stations. 

5. Statement of expenditure on accoimt of pay and allowances of N.C.O's. and 
men of the Permanent Force. 

6. Statement of expenditure on account of pay and allowances of N.C.Os. and 
men of the Permanent Force with details of expenditure, by stations. 



62 



DEPARTMEXT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 



12 GEORGE V A. 1922 






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DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 



63 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 



Statement No. 2.- 



-Showing expenditure by stations on account of Pay and Allowances 
of the Permanent Force for the year 1920-21 



Stations 



Pay and 

Allowances. 

Officers and 

Warrant 

Officers 



Pay and 

Allowances, 

N.C.O's 

and 

Men 



Total 
Pay 
and 

Allow- 



London, Ont. . . 
Toronto, Ont.. 
Kingston, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont.. . 
Montreal, Que. 
Quebec. Que. . . 
Halifax, N.S... 
St. John, N.B. 
Winnipeg, Man. 
Victoria, B.C.. 
Regina, Sa.sk.. 
Calgary, Alia.. 
Abroad 



S cts, 

116, .580 56 

201,405 50 

196,350 

253,245 43 

146,325 SO 

158,428 72 

263,594 94 

48, 787 99 

117,0.58 46 

149,603 34 

42,075 98 

76,862 88 



$ cts 
171,799 6i 
363,431 28 
311,273 74 
323.249 13 
291,816 19 
288.175 26 
442.451 97 

51,741 83 
212,819 08 
193,135 30 

45,9.30 54 
129,616 78 



$ cts. 
288,380 23 
564,836 78 
507,623 95 
576,494 56 
4.38. 141 99 
446,603 98 
706,046 91 
100, 529 82 
.329,877 54 
343,038 64 
88,006 .52 
206,479 66 



1,770,319 81 



2,825,740 77 



4,596.060 58 



64 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 



12 GEORGE V. A. 1922 



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DEPARTMENT OP MILITIA AND DEFENCE 



65 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 3d 



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66 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 



12 GEORGE V. A. 1922 



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68 DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 

12 GEORGE V. A. 1922 

APPENDIX C 

EEPORT OF THE INSPECTOR GEXERAL, FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 

ENDING MARCH 31, 1921 

PERMANENT FORCE 

The Permanent Force is well trained throughout. OflBcers and non-commis- 
sioned officers are efficient and hardworking and with but few exceptions have 
overseas service. 

War games have been efficiently carried out and drill and manoeuvre practieed 
so far as winter weather permitted. 

Discipline and interior economy is now good. 

Owing to lack of peace training by a number of officers, and, also, on account of 
unsuitable men having been enlisted as recruits, a number of units were weak on 
these two points but are now satisfactory. I found one small unit not up to standard, 
for which a very inferior barracks, in which it was quartered, was, in my opinion, 
largely responsible. 

The provision of sanitary and up to date barracks is, in my opinion, the most 
urgent need of the Permanent Force, to-day. 

I cannot too strongly recommend that barracks should be built, or provided, at 
the earliest moment in the vicinity of Montreal, for the Royal Canadian Regiment; 
Toronto for the Royal Canadian Dragoons, the Royal Canadian Regiment and the 
Permanent Machine Gun Corps; Calgary, for Lord Strathcona's Horse; Vancouver, 
for the Permanent Force to be stationed there. 

It is most important that the Armoury at Calgary should be vacated by Head- 
quarters Military District No. 13, and by " B" Squadron, Lord Strathcona's Horse, 
at the earliest moment in order to release the building for Active Militia unite for which 
it was built, and in the case of Lord Strathcona's Horse for the added reason that 
the Armouriee are most unsuitable for Barracks, mainly for the reason that the 
barrack rooms are unsuitable and below the ground level. 

FORTRESSES AT HALIFAX AND ESQUIMALT 

Both at Halifax and Esquimalt I found the armament in excellent condition 
and well kept. All arms of the service were clean, well turned out, and efficient 
in their duties, both for manning the guns and lighte. 

The ammunition at all forts had been thoroughly overhauled and put into work- 
able shape. 

ACTIVE (non-permanent) MILITIA 

In reporting upon the Active Militia for the year ending March 31, 1921, the 
following points should be borne in mind: — 

(a) There was no training in camp for Active Militia during the summer of 
1920. 

(6) Units of Active Militia organized since the termination of the war made 
generally but little real progi-ess until the early spring of this year. 

The result of my inspections during January, February, and March have been, 
in view of the nrSmber of units still in process of reorganization, generally satis- 
factory. 

Because of reorganization being so recent in many units, and still in process in 
others, my inspections during the past year were carried out with a view to assisting 
the units just come into being, and were not critical, as they would have been during 
a normal period. 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 69 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

I found tliii' esprit to be very high throughout, though the strength in personnel in 
training varied greatly in different Military Districts. 

The great majority of officers have oversea service with good records and the same 
applies to the Senior non-commissioned officers. The rank and file were mainly 
cwmpoeed of men who were too young at the time to take part in the war, though in 
a number of units there was a good sprinkling of returned men in the ranks. 

Generally speaking, elementary training only had been carried out. The reason 
for this, mainly, was that although the officers and non-commissioned officers were, 
as a rule, qualified by oversea service, the work of organization, procuring recruits, 
etc., had taken up much time. 

Lack of Armoury accommodation in a number of places, affects very adversely 
the reorganization and efficiency of militia units. Armouries are very urgently 
needed at Moncton, N.B., for the 7th Canadian Machine Gun Brigade and the 8th 
Battery, C.'F.A. Westmount, P.Q., for the Royal Montreal Regiment. Vancouver, 
B.C., for the Irish Fusiliers of Canada. Regina, Sask., for the South Saskatchewan 
Regiment. 

I found a general feeling among Commanding Officers that they should have 
Government assistance in keeping their office, official correspondence, etc., which 
carries on throughout the year. The consensus of opinion was that while a Peilmanent 
Force officer and non-commissioned officer would be preferable, the difficulty would 
be met if a grant of money was authorized for the purpose of paying an officer and 
non-'commissioned officer of the Unit for this extra work. 

I am of opinion that for comparatively slight remuneration a suitable officer 
and non-commissioned officer could be found b.v the majority of city corps who would 
carry on the clerical work of the unit throughout the year. 

It was not possible this year to make an efficiency classification of units. Officers 
and senior non-commissioned officers I found, generally, to be efficient on account of 
war service. Junior non-commissioned officers and rank and file, generally, were 
untrained and had not carried out rifle practice, WaO-^l, for the reason that during 
the summer and autumn anonths of 1920 the units were not sufficiently organized. 
Thus out of forty (40) battalions inspected, a total of si.x thousand five hundred 
(6,500) other ranks had performed rifle practice, either at miniature ranges or at local 
rifle ranges where it was possible for men to turn out in the afternoons for practice. 

Drill was fair, but no field training had been carried out for the reason shown 
above. 

The following statement shows the number of units authorized to train, (a) 
inspected by Inspector General, (6) not inspected by Inspector General, (c) inspected 
by another officer (General Officer Commanding) : — 

, Cavalry Artillery Machine Infantry 

Regiments Batteries Gun Coy's Battalions 
(o) Units inspected by Inspector general. 4 32 26 40 

(6) Units not inspected by Inspector 
General for which no inspection re- 
ports have been received to date 17-5-21 5 37 13 13 
(c) Units inspected by another officer 
(G.O.C.) for which reports have been 
received to date, 17-5-21 1 s 3 14 

10 77 42 67 

REORGANIZATION AND TRAINING 

Cavalry units are reorganizing but slowly. 

Artillery units are reorganizing well and took advantage of the winter training, 
and after sixteen days in camp should be good and efficient from an active service 
standard. 



70 DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

Infantry battalions vary greatly in esprit, efficiency, and strength. Of the forty 
battalions inspected by me twenty-two showed every sign of becoming efficient and 
strong, nine were outstandingly good and would be fit for Active Service after a 
short period of training, and nine had made but little real progress. 

Machine Gun units are in general very good, organized on good and sound lines, 
somewhat under strength, but comijosed of excellent personnel. 

Engineer ttnits are stiU in a state of organization. 

DISCIPLINE AND INTERIOR ECONOMY 

Discipline and interior economy I found to be good and much improved to that 
of pre-war days, due mainly to the oversea experience of the officers. Equipment was 
well kept, and dress and turn-out was good. 

Increased armoury accommodation is urgently required for equipment as well as 
for personnel, to which I have previously referred. 

Officers' books were generally incomplete, and these were not available at the 
District Headquarters. A number of these are, I understand, out of print, being 
under revision, and may be expected within a short time. 

OFFICERS TRAINING. CORPS 

Officers' Training Corps are progressing exceedingly well at many of the 
universities, notably so, the Universities of New Brunswick, Saskatchewan and 
Alberta. Where military science and training has been given academic support by 
the university authorities, the beneficial results are most marked. 

CADET CORPS 

I was much impressed with the efficiency of the Cadet Corps throughout the 
country. It ie now appreciated much more widely than heretofore that the drill 
and discipline in which cadets are instructed are of the greatest value to them not 
only during school years but for the duties of citizenship in the future. 

Cadet Corps, both in number and strength, are now increasing so rapidly, it 
would appear that, if this increase is to be met with the proportionate Government 
support as heretofore, a considerable increase in the future vote will be required. 

The full-eized rifle is far too heavy and long for the average-sized boy and I strongly 
recommend the general issue of a shorter and lighter rifle. 

I found the Stetson hat to be universally unpopular and the email wedged cap 
to be in general request. 

SUMMARY 

The military value of the Militia was, on March 31, 1921, considerable notwith- 
standing disadvantages due to reorganization, etc., etc. During February and March, 
1921, there was much activity and signs of increased efficiency among units training 
as City Corps. 

Nineteen hundred and twenty and nineteen hundred and twenty-one can be 
considered the year of reorganization; 1921-22 will be the first year since the war in 
which field training will be carried out by the Active Militia — and while the period 
of field training for 1921-22 is so limited that a high state of efficiency cannot be 
expected at its termination, it should, however, be then possible to make a fair estimate 
of the military value of the Militia, which, at present, is still somewhat in a state of 
transition. 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA. AND DEFENCE 71 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 



APPENDIX D 

EEPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT, DOMINION ARSENAL, QUEBEC, 
FOR YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1921 

EMPLOYEES 

Number of employees on Augnst 15, 1920, (date of closing) — 391. 

The average number of employees from February 19 to March 31, 1921 — 260. 

FINANCIAIi STATEMENTS 

1. Appropriation and Expenditure. 

2. Statement of moneys received and deposited to credit of Receiver General. 

3. Distribution of Disbursements. 

4. Statement of Assets and Liabilities. 

5. Capital Account. 

6. Production Statement. 

7. Reconciliation Statement. 

Appropriation and Expenditure, 1920-21 

Total letter of credit $433,000 00 

Balance lapsed unexpended 45,030 60 

Gross expenditure at Quebec $387,969 40 

Gross expenditure at Ottawa 97,957 89 

$485,927 29 

Less refunds to current year's expenditure 4,034 03 

Expenditure charged to Dominion Arsenal, Quebec, Vote $464,464 59 

Expenditure charged to Bonus Vote No. 363 16,325 97 

Expenditure charged to Customs Dues Vote 786 04 

Expenditure charged to Civil Service Gratuities Vote 316 66 

$481,893 26 $481,893 26 



Statement of Money Received and Deposited to Credit of Receiver General 

Petty cash i 50 00 

Unused advances for travelling expenses 11 15 

Canada steamships 2 08 

Balance salaries and wages account 3,970 50 

$ 4,033 73 

Refund of Customs dues 30 

Receipts from sales of scrap 18,523 01 

Receipts from sales of fmished goods 3,921 16 

Returned barrels, refund of freight and other refunds 2,334 93 

Amount credited to current year's expenditure (Dominion Arsenal 

Vote) $ <.033 73 

Amount credited to current year's expenditure (Customs Dues Vote) 30 

Amount credited to casual revenue 24,779 10 



$28,813 13 $23,813 13 



72 DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA A^D DEFENCE 

12 GEORGE V^ A. 1922 
DiSTRIBDTION OF DISBURSEMENTS, 1920-21 

Dominion Arsenal, Quebec, Vote— 

Salaries $ 36,652 21 

Wages 215,616 65 

Wages special service 883 50 

Power and light (including gas purchased). .. 10,719 78 

Fuel 38,684 59 

Telegrams, telephones, postage, printing and 

stationery 1,892 40 

Lumber 8,507 23 

Freight, transport (except cartage) and travel- 
ling expenses 5.306 42 

Cartage 2,206 12 

Cordite 41,937 00 

Aluminum 4,396 00 

Steel 3,087 74 

Spelter and tin 1,96125 

Bandoliers 9,765 08 

Other materials, including oils, hardware, cast- 
ings, acids, factory and chemical supplies. 54,841 35 

Belting 422 13 

Equipment 625 80 

Machinery 12,410 00 

Miscellaneous 269 99 

$450,185 24 

Customs Dues Votes 786 04 

Bonus Vote No. 363 — 

Bonus payments to employees 16,325 97 

Dominion Arsenal Quebec Vote — 

Gratuities to employees under P.C. 46.'3139 14,279 35 

Civil Service Gratuities Vote — 

Special gratuities (Mrs. A. Samson) 316 66 



$481,893 26 



Statement of Assets and Liabilities, March 31. 1921 

Assets Liabilities 

Accounts receivable $ 1,732 09 

Material in stores 218,000 03 

Inventory of work in process and finished 

goods 363,611 37 

Buildings 229,336 54 

Machinery 222,275 61 

Equipment, general 18,643 72 

Belting 1.538 66 

Gauges ' 7.500 00 

Tools, loose 8,751 34 

Office furniture, fixtures and supplies. . . . 2,053 49 

Deferred charges 12,840 00 

Accounts payable 1,228 93 

Surplus, Department of Militia and Defence 1.085,053 92 



$1,086,282 85 $1,086,282 85 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AS I) DEFENCE 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 39 



73 



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DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 



75 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 3& 



Eeoonoiliation Statement 



Inventory of work in process and fin- 
ished goods, Maren 31. 1920 

Inventory of material in stores, March 
31st. 1920 

Net expenditure. 1920-21 

Additions and renewals by Engineers 
M.D. 5, not paid for by Arsenal 
Funds 

Water tax paid by Ottawa (not 
charged to Arsenal Funds) 

.\ccount3 receivable. March 31. 1920.. 

.\ccounts payable, March 31, 1921. . . . 

Inventory of work in process and fin- 
ished goods, March 31, 1921 

Inventory of material in stores, 
March 31, 1921 

Finished goods delivered during year 
as per Production Statement 

Net increase in value of capital assets 
by .-Vrsen-il Funds 

Expenses during temporary closure of 
A] 5enal — 



Gratuities paid employees on release . . 



$ cts. 

325,998 56 

201,173 25 
481.893 26 



5,812 98 

1,800 00 
7,305 12 
1,228 93 



$ cts. 



$ cts. 



Wages 

Material... 
Overhead. 



..P. C. 46-3139 

Civil Service Gratuity. 



38,380 38 
12,594 62 
19,119 93 

14,279 35 
316 66 



Cost of living bonus paid employees. . 
Refunds credited to Casual Revenue. 

Deferred charges 

.\ccounts receivable, March 31. 1921.. 
Accounts payable, March 31, 1920. . . 



1,025,212 10 



363,611 37 

218,000 03 

289, 149 40 

12,030 14 

70,094 93 



14,. 596 01 
16,325 97 
24,779 10 
12,840 00 
1,732 09 
2,053 06 

1,025,212 10 



76 DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 

12 GEORGE V. A. 1922 



APPENDIX E 

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT, DOMINION AESENAL, LINDSAY, 
FOR YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1921 

Employees 
The average number of employees throughout the year was 159. 

FiNANCUL Statements 

1. Appropriation and Expenditure. 

2. Statement of Moneys Received and Deposited to Credit of Receiver General. 

3. Distribution of Disbursements. 

4. Statement of Assets and Liabilities. 

5. Capital Account. 

6. Production Statement. 

7. Reconciliation Statement. 

Appropriation and Expenditure, 1920-21 

Total letter of credit $227,000 00 

Balance lapsed, unexpended 1,214 11 

Gross expenditure at Lindsay $225,785 89 

Gross expenditure at Ottawa 9,676 01 

$235,461 90 

Less refunds to Current Tear's Expenditure 617 54 

Expenditure charged to Dominion Arsenal, Lindsay, Vote $211,952 41 

Expenditure charged to Demobilization Vote 3,811 60 

Expenditure charged to Customs dues 109 21 

Expenditure charged to cost of living bonus 4,273 35 

Expenditure charged to Engineer services 6,036 11 

Expenditure charged to maintenance 4 11 

Expenditure charged to ordnance, arms, lands, etc 8,040 93 

Expenditure charged to Permanent Force 616 64 

$234,844 36 $234,844 36 



St.atement of Moneys RECEiVEn and Depositeii to Credit of the (Receiver General 

Petty cash $200 00 

Nichols Chemical Co .-• •• 322 00 

M.D. No. 3, sale of fuel 95 54 

$ 617 54 

Grasselli Chemical Co 105 00 

G. T. Ry., account railroad siding 802 48 

Department Militia and Defence, account railroad siding 1,186 06 

Lindsay Coal Co 120 

Amount credited current year's expenditure $ 617 54 

Amount credited Demobilization 'Vote .. 2,093 54 

Amount credited Casual Revenue 1 20 

$2,712 28 $2,712 28 



Note. — An amount of $37,202.34 was transferred to the credit of the Dominion Arsenal, 
Lindsay Vote, on account of materials and supplies delivered to Quebec Arsenal. 



nKI'MCI'MENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 



77 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

Distribution of Disbursements, 1920-21 

Dominion Arsenal, Lindsay, Vote — 

Salaries $12,084 56 

Wages 97,661 90 

Power and light 9,438 39 

Water 1,603 23 

Fuel 42,753 84 

Telegrams, telephones, postage, printing and sta- 
tionery 855 22 

Lumber 2,071 17 

Freight, transport, travelling and transfer ex- 
penses 1,227 87 

Cordite 35.188 87 

Oils, paints, waste, emery wheels, hardware.. .. 2,178 81 

Steel, iron, copper, brass tubing and castings.. 1,069 70 

Acids, gas, chemical supplies 1,878 67 

Antimony and aluminium. 779 36 

Glazeboard 297 70 

Mercury 234 00 

Factory supplies 1,346 23 

Miscellaneous 1,282 89 

$211,952 41 

Demobilization Vote — 

Hardware, lumber, oil and paints charged to 

Capital $ 327 50 

Unloading and storing Ross rifles 5S6 40 

Gratuities paid clerical employees on release.. 338 00 

Printing and stationery 428 97 

Transport 944 67 

Adjustment rental railway siding 1,186 06 

3,811 60 

Customs Dues Vote 109 21 

Cost of Living Bonus Vote 363 4,273 35 

Engineer services and works — 

Salaries and wages $ 3,202 66 

Repairs, painting, etc 2,833 45 

6,036 11 

Maintenance Military Properties — 

Rental of phone for engineers 4 11 

Ordnance Arms, Lands, etc. — 

Salaries $ 4,533 84 

Wages 3,392 20 

Telephones, telegraph and postage 42 24 

Supplies, etc 72 65 

■ 8,040 93 

Permanent Force — 

Adjustment of salary of Assistant Superintendent previous to 

transfer 616 64 

$234,844 36 

Statement of Assets and Liabilities, March 31, 1921 

Accounts receivable — Assets Liabilities 

Material in stores $ 227,363 10 

Inventory of work in process and finished 

goods 136,042 73 

Land 39,943 97 

Buildings 748.921 21 

Machinery 376.546 09 

Equipment 47.748 00 

Belting 6 72 

Shafting and pulleys 27,386 25 

Chemical apparatus 482 82 

Gas apparatus 36,123 25 

Heating apparatus 14,757 22 

Track scales 3,978 11 

Railway siding 4.725 51 

Roads 4,148 43 

Sewers 28,747 85 

Fences and sidewalks 3,797 55 

Traverses and drainage at magazine 5,798 42 

Traverses and drainage at Filling Branch.. .. 2,097 85 

Pipe trenches 1,887 00 

Deferred charges 74 73 

Accounts payable 23,990 69 

Surplus, Department Militia and Defence . . 1. 686.586 12 

11,710,576 81 117710.576 8l" 



78 



DEPARTMENT OF itlLlTIA AND DEFENCE 



12 GEORGE V A. 1922 



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DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 



79 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

Statement of Production and Costs 





Quantity 


Rate 


Per 


Amount 




Boxes Ammunition S.A. 1000 Rds. .303" in Chargera 
No. 1 


4,479 
2,440,032 


S c. 

2. 793.50 1 
66.84,500 


Ka 

PerM 


$ c. 

12,512 36 


Cartridges S A. Ball 303' Cordite Mk. VII 


138.704 13 








151,216 49 



Eeconciliation Statement 



112,064 37 

245,829 36 
234,844 36 



$ cts. $ cte. 
Inventory of work in process and fin- 
ished Koods, March 31, 1920 

Inventory of material in stores, March 

31, 1920 

Net expenditure, 1920-21 

Inventory of work in process and fin- 
ished goods, March 31, 1921 

Inventory of material in Stores, March 

31, 1921 

Finished goods delivered during year 

as per Production Statement 

Expenses during temporary closure of 

.Arsenal Salaries 3, 636 16 

Wages 9,708 40 

Gratuities 2, 226 61 

Boiler house expenses.... 4,090 39 

Electrical expenses 2, 716 57 

Water 179 95 



Gratuities paid employees on release 

Cost of living bonus paid to employees 

Refunds credited to Casual Revenue Stores account returns. . . 106 20 

Sales to Quebec Arsenal 37,202 34 

Deferred charges ... 

Adjustment rental railway siding 

Adjustment of salary assistant super- 
intendent 

Net increase to buildings as per Cap- 
ital Account 

Expenses transferring bullet plant and 

inspection room to case plant Wages 667 50 

Material 104 43 



Expenses shipping machinery to chief 
Inspector Ammunition. Quebec 

Expenses Chief Inspector Ammunitior., 
Lindsay Branch, during year 



.Salaries, wages, etc 8,040 93 

Material supplied 38 76 

Work performed 63 03 

Power and lighting sup- 
plied 300 00 

Heating supplied 1 , 552 92 

Rifle range expenses 94 32 

Express accounts charged 1 10 



Wages of men unloading and storing 
Ross rifles. 

Decrease in accounts payable March 
31, 1921, under those of 1920 



March 31, 1920 24,299 92 

March 31, 1921 23,990 69 



$ cts. 



136,042 73 
227,363 10 
151,216 49 



22, .558 08 

338 00 

4,273 35 



37,308 54 
74 73 

847 76 

616 64 
327 50 



771 93 
12 55 



10,091 06 
586 40 

309 23 



592, 738 09 



592. 738 09 



80 UEPARTMEyr OF IIILITIA AXD DEFENCE 

12 GEORGE V A. 1922 



APPENDIX F 

REPORT OF THE COMMANDANT ROYAL MILITARY COLLEGE OF 
CANADA FOR THE YEAR 1920-21 

FOREWORD 

May I place on record my grateful thanks and that of all ranks at the Royal 
Military College of Canada, for the keen attention and unfailing sympathetic consider- 
ation which all matters pertaining to the College have received at the hands of the 
Honourable the Minister of Militia and Defence and the Militia Council; and may I 
add that this has helped me immeasurably in my efforts to make the Royal Military 
College of Canada what I conceive it ought to be — "the corner-stone of the Canadian 
Militia." 

DISCIPLINE 

With three exceptions, the conduct and discipline of the Cadets has been highly 
satisfactory. I am much pleased with the general tone and the assistance which aU 
the menabers of the 1st Class have given me and the rest of the Staff in main- 
taining the high standards of the College, my thanks being specially due to Battaliou 
Sergeant-Major H. A. Mackenzie, who has filled his somewhat onerous duties with 
tact and firmness in keeping with the best traditions of the College. He has been well 
supported by the Company Sergeant-Majors and senior N.C.O's. 

If anything, the bonds of discipline have been drawn a little tighter this year 
than in the past, since on the return of the Cadets after the Christmas vacation, the 
administration of the College was reorganized. 

It remained in two Companies as before, each Company being composed of two 
Platoons, but, in order to provide a working basis with a proper chain of responsibility 
throughout, the Companies were organized on the lines of an Infantry Battalion, the 
Battalion Sergeant-Major acting as commander, two Company Sergeant-Majors as 
Company Commanders, and two Company Sergeant-Majors as Platoon Commanders. 

The rank of Company Quartermaster-Sergeant was introduced and the remainder 
of the N.C.O's commanded or were attached to Sections. 

The administration of the Gentlemen Cadets is therefore now carried out as in 
the best Battalions in the Service. The Company Commanders and Platoon Com- 
manders act as Officers and the Company Quartermaster-Sergeants are in charge of 
stores and are responsible for their issue and receipt. Section Commanders are 
responsible for the control, discipline, etc., of their sections. 

Over the Cadet Company Officers are placed officers of the Superior Staff to 
supervise, each Company having a Superior Staff Company Commander and each 
platoon a Superior Staff Platoon Commander. In addition to this, a Cadet Daily 
Orderly Officer has been instituted, the duties for which are drawn up on the lines 
of an Orderly Officer in a Regiment. These duties are performed each day by a 
different Cadet of the Senior Class, who is responsible that the duties are carried out 
under the Officer of the Week (a member of the Superior Staff). 

In this way it is hoped that the Cadets will become thoroughly familiar with the 
organization of a unit, whereas, hitherto, the study of the administrative methods m 
use at the Royal Military College were of little value to a Cadet after graduating. 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AMD DEFENCE 81 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 39 

In the absence of the senior Cadet, the Cadet Orderly Officer takes the parades, 
giving him an opportunity of becoming familiar with the handling of the whole college 
on parade. In addition, the Cadets have been trained to form up for meal parades, 
etc., as either a Kegiment of Cavalry, a Battery of Artillery or a Battalion of 
Infantry. 

SPORTS 

The principle of the Eoyal Military College of Canada in so far as sports art 
concerned is to get as many as possible to play games and to raise the Gentlemen 
Cadets to a high standard of athletic efficiency, rather than to produce a gilt-edged 
championship team. 

Thus, in the belief that inter-collegiate contests should be pre-eminent, every 
Platoon plays every other Platoon at football, and every Section plays every other 
Section at hockey. The aim is that every Cadet at the College shall be able to play 
every game, and shall understand it thoroughly; being able both to teach it to his 
men and umpire it. This is part of the College training. 

In June last, the mounted sports were held and proved very successful, the Cadets 
of the Senior Class giving an excellent exhibition. 

Our football showing in the C.I.E.F.U. this year was not up to the usual standard. 
We were defeated by Queen's and, in consequence had to drop out of the league early 
in the season. The second team reached the finals but lost the cliampionsliip. The 
Gentlemen Cadets were, however, encouraged to play football through the inauguration 
of inter-company and inter-platoon matches. Competition being keen, a larger number 
than heretofore played rugby, learned the game and derived the accomisanying benefit, 
namely, the combined exercises of brain and muscle under stress, and training in 
leadership. 

The athletic and aquatic sports were held as usual in the autumn and were a 
success. 

Our harrier team competed in the inter-collegiate harrier race and our track 
team was represented at the inter-collegiate track meet. 

In the C.I.H.TJ. and O.H.A., our hockey teams were unable to get beyond the 
first round, but inter-section hockey was played throughout the entire winter and 
created keen competition. 

The annual boxing and wrestling tournament was held in March and produced 
some very good bouts. 

It is hoped that we shall be able to introduce inter-platoon cricket this year. 

The axcellent results obtained by the Eifle Club during the past year are reported 
on elsewhere. 

ATTENDANCE 

In June, 1920, 102 candidates presented themselves for the E.M.C. entrance 
examination. 

Of these, 61 qualified, and the remainder failed. Of those who qualified, 54 
actually joined; one of whom was discharged later at the request of his parents 
in consequence of a long-standing disability. 

Of the seven who did not join, one was medically unfit, and for six there was no 
accommodation. 

The recruits proved to be a splendid class, well above the average physically, 
and there is no doubt that they will benefit materially by the course of instruction 
imparted at the College. 

During the year, a Cadet of the Senior Class was discharged at the request of his 
parents. 
3ft— 6 



82 DEPARTMEliT OF MILITIA A.VD DEFENCE 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

The matriculation examination for entrance to the several universities is modified 
to suit the faculty of that university- and varies 'with each university and faculty 
thereof. The needs of the educational work after entrance determines the character 
of the subjects required for matriculation. 

Thus, in the matriculation for the Faculty of Medicine, Latin is an obligatory 
subject, and in the matriculation for the Faculty of Applied Science, trigonometry 
is an obligatory subject. Just as the subjects for matriculation are selected because 
they bear an influence upon the work to be demanded after entrance, so in our 
own Military College those subjects are selected upon which the work after entrance 
is based. Geography is essentially a military subject par excellence, and mathe- 
matics are as important here as in the Faculty of Applied Science at any university. 

I hope that this interpretation of the essentials of a matriculation examination 
will appeal to those interested in the formulation of a policy for this Military College. 

Inasmuch as the Royal Military College is under the administration of the 
Federal Government, it is not competent to grant a de^ee, which power is delegated 
solely to the provinces of the Dominion under the British North America Act. In 
order to encourage the provincial authorities to recognize our graduates whose aca- 
demic standing would justify such recognition, let me suggest that the following 
principles of selection and recognition be adopted : — 

(i) Those graduates of the E.M.C. whose standing in subjects taken here is 
Y5 per cent upwards, may be accepted by the university as of Fourth Year St-atus, 
thus joining and proceeding to the degree in one year. 

(ii) Those graduates of the E.M.C. whose standing in subjects taken here is less 
than 75 per cent and above 50 per cent, be accepted by the university as of Third Year 
Status, thus joining, and proceeding to the degree in two years. 

In order to make the authorities of the provincial universities familiar with the 
character and scope of our academic efforts, I would suggest that a Board of Asso- 
ciate Examiners be selected from members of the several university staffs. The papers 
on the several subjects taught here would be prepared by the member of the staff who 
presided over the teaching of the subject and the answers read -and marks assigned 
by the examiner who prepared the paper. The answer papers would then be trans- 
mitted to the Associate Examiner, who would read the answers and assign the 
values thereto. The independent reports of each' could be assembled and amalga- 
mated. The Associate E.xaminer to report to the university authorities as well, who 
would thus be placed in a position to judge of the propriety of recognizing our gradu- 
ates to suitable standing in accordance with some such principle as oiitlined above. 

SUPERIOR STAFF 

There have been several changes in the Superior Staff during the past year: — 

Lieut-Colonel A. D. Cameron, D.S.O.. M.C., (L.S.H. (R.C.), Professor of Tactics 
resigned to take up a civil career, and Lieut-Colonel C. F. Constantine, D.S.O., 
E.C.H.A., left to attend the Staff College, Camberley. 

I was extremely sorry to lose the services of these efficient officers, both of whom 
were keen and active and rendered excellent service. Colonel Constantine especially, 
a splendid coach, by the interest and time be gave in the supervision of the cadet 
football and hockey teams. 

Major P. Ernshaw, D.S.O., M.C., left the College to take up an appointment in 
the Canadian Permanent Force. He had been my Signalling Officer on the Western 
Front, and had thrown himself heartily into the work of the College. Whilst I regret 
his departure from the College, I am glad of the opportunity given him in the Per- 
manent Force. 

Major R. W. Brigstocke has been taken on temporarily as Instructor in Chemistry. 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 33 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 39 

We have been fortunate in securinjr the following officers of the Canadian 
Permanent Force for appointments on the Superior Staff: — 

Lieut-Colonel K. M. Perry, D.S.O., p.s.c, the R.C.E., as Professor of Tactics, 
vice Lt-'Colonel A. D. Cameron, D.S.O., M.C. 

Lieut.-Colonel W. G. Beeman, D.S.O., R.C.A., as Professor of Artillery, vice Lt.- 
Colonel C. F. Constantine, D.S.O. 

Captain W. J. Finney, O.B.E., R.C.IT.A., temporarily attached to the College 
during the year 1920, has been taken on the strength as Instructor in Artillery. 

Mr. S. Marion has been appointed Instructor in French. 

I regret to say that we are about to lose the services of Lieutenant S. C. Cutbush, 
A.P.T.S., wKo, time expired, is about to take u^ a civil appointment in Montreal. 
It is impossible to speak too highly of this officer's services during his eight and a 
half years as Physical Training Instructor and the high standard he has set and 
attained for the Cadets in his speeiar subject. He carries with him into civil life the 
respect and hearty good will of all ranks at the Eoyal Military College, and I per- 
sonally hope that his efficient services may be secured by some unit of the Active 
Militia, as it is hard for me to imagine him not being a soldier, and I realize the benefit 
that would accrue to a regiment having such an efficient officer as one of its instructors. 

With reference to the Administrative Staff, may I again bring to your favourable 
notice the splendid and efficient work of Captain E. J. Harvey, C.M.S.C, Quarter- 
master and Paymaster. R.M.C., to whose untiring efforts the success of these two 
branches is entirely due. He, in addition, administers a Subordinate Staff of 37 
members, ^and has carried out his responsible duties in a very capable manner. 

The energetic work of my Staff Adjutant, Major E. de L. Greenwood, R.E., must 
also be brought to notice. This officer has now taken over the duties of "Officer i/c 
Records" in addition to those of his specific appointment, has proved himself zealous 
in the discharge of his duties, and is accurate and efficient. 

Again, I have to express my best thanks to the members of the Staff, both Superior 
and Subordinate, and especially to the Director of Studies, Professor I. E. Martin, 
for their never failing readiness to help and co-operate with me at all times and in 
all matters relative to the efficiency and welfare of the Gentlemen Cadets and the 
College in general. Professor Martin, an educationalist of note, has had thirty years 
experience at the College, but time has sharpened rather than dulled the edge of his 
keenness on producing sound academic teaching, with its accompanying beneficial 
results. Until the appointment of Colonel Dawson as Professor of Mathematics, he 
had performed the duties pertaining to that department in addition to his work as 
Director of Studies. The R.M.C is fortunate in possessing him. 



ilEDICAL ARRANGEMENTS 

f 

The health of the Cadets has been very good during the year and no deaths have 
occurred. 

Two hundred and sixteen Gentlemen Cadets were admitted to hospital daring 
the year and 460 attended hospital for treatment. 

There were four cases of fracture during the year, all of which have successfully 
recovered, and a certain number of operations, appendicitis, hernia, etc., were 
performed. 

There were thirty cases of mumps, and one case of smallpox, all of which have 
fully recovered. 

The buildings are in a sanitai'y condition, and a good state of repair, and are 
excellently kept. The kitchen and utensils, the Medical Officer reports, are kept 
clean and well polished. 
36— 6J 



84 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 

12 GEORGE V. A. 1922 



I am move than satisfied witli the way in which Lt.-Colonel R. J. Gardiner, 
A.M.C., has carried out his duties as Medical Officer, and the careful manner in 
which he has safe-guarded the health of the Gentlemen Cadets. He has been ably 
assisted by Nursing Sister E. B. Wurtele, A.M.C., who has worked indefatigably in 
the interests of the Gentlemen Cadets. 



ST.4TISTICS OF PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT OF CADETS 
1st Class 



Date of Inspection 


No. in 
Class 


Average 

Age 


Averag 


3 individual increases since last measure- 
ment 


Height 


Weight 


Chest 


Forearm 


Upper 
^\rm 


May, 1920 


57 
SB 


18-11 
20-8 


5'9"' 
5'9'" 


142 
145 


33i 
36? 
35J 
391 


m 
11 




April, 1921 . . ^ 


m 

13i 






Gained 










2h 


1 














1 


2nd Class 


April, 1920 

April, 1921 


61 
39 


17-5 
17-10 


s'sr 
5'8r 


141 J 
142i 


321 
36 

m 

37 


lOJ 

11 


12 
13 












r 


1 


1 


i 


1 










3rd Class 


May, 1920 


IS 
IS 


19-9 
20-9 


S'9' 

5'iir 


13SJ 
140 


331 
361 
36 
39 


m 
n 


UJ 


April, 1921 


12§ 


Gained . . 






2^ 


n 


21 
U 


1 


J 










4th Class 


August, 1920 


53 
53 


17-6 
18-6 


S'll' 

5'ir 


131 
134 


.325 
35 
32ii 
36 


105 


11 


Apijl, 1921 


12 














3 


1 


I 


1 













SUBORDINATE STAFF 

Military 

The work of the Subordinate Military Staff during the past year has been in 
every way satisfactory, and I am more than pleased with the service they have given to 
the College. They are well above the average, keen on their resi^ective duties, and 
efficient to a marked degree. 

I regret to report that Sergt.-Major (W.O) F. J. Coldham, R.E., the efficient 
N.C.O. Instructor in Survey, has left the College, time expired, to enter civil life. 



niCPAHTMKNT OF Ml LIT I \ AND DEFENCE 85 

SESSIONAL. PAPER No. 36 

During the many years he liad been at tlie CoUoge, he had rendered excellent and 
valuable service, and he took with hiin on leaving, the very best wishes of all con- 
nected with the R.M.C. for his success. He was a Warrant Officer of distinct ability, 
and had earned the respect and esteem of all those with whom he came in contact. 

Civil 

I am well satisfied with the work performed by the Civil Subordinate Staff, and 
I mueh appreciate their efforts and the valuable assistance they have afPorded me. 
I would be sorry to lose any one of them. 

Pending the introduction of the military basis for this Staff, I feel servants 
should be dressed in a distinctive College uniform ; and now that the price of clothing 
is again reaching a normal basis the provision of suitable uniform clothing for the 
Servant Staff should be given consideration. 

The kitchen staff are considerably handicapped, since the erection of the new 
Educational building, which blocks the light to the windows, necessitates the use of 
electric light for the greater portion of the working day. 

S. Caddiqk, kitchen man was retired in September last, on account of age limit. 

Miss N. Milton, clerk in Paymaster and Quartermaster's Department, was 
retired on April 1 last. She had been appointed, since December, 1916, to take the 
place of a non-commissioned officer who proceeded overseas, and has rendered very 
good service during the period of her appointment. 

CALENDAR 

In the report submitted last year, it was stated that a Calendar was in course of 
preparation. 

The work on this publication is as far advanced as is possible at the present 
time, but, owing to the fact that there is still doubt as to what system is to be 
adopted for entrance, we have been unable to gather together all the information, 
necessary for the Calendar. 

It is hoped that this much needed publication will come into existence shortly, 
when the decision regarding the entrance examination is finally reached. 

However, in our Magazine, *' The Eoyal Military College of Canada Review — 
Log of H.M.S. Stone Frigate ", which was started last year, we have a full record of 
all the College activities, education and social. This periodical, which is published 
twice yearly, in May and November, besides keeping its readers informed as to the 
life and progress of the College, affords opportunities to the Gentlemen Cadets to 
express themselves in print, and thus assists materially in their training in English. 

UNIFORMS 

A College master tailor and assistant tailor have been installed during the year, 
and this staff has been engaged on the manufacture of College tunics and the cutting 
of Gentlemen Cadets garments which, when cut, have been handed to the College 
contractors for completion. 

To complete and improve the efficiency of our tailoring establishment, a full staff 
is required, including work girls for trimming and making; and Militia Headquarters 
has authorized us to engage them as from July 1 next. 

It has been recommended that the manufacture of uniforms be carried out at the 
College, as is done at the United States Military Academy, West Point. Until this 
is done it is felt that the making of uniforms will not be on a satisfactory basis. 

During the year, we hope to have the return to the old uniforms completed, with 
the exception of wearing out of the greatcoats (British warms) by tlie two Senior 
Classes. 



86 DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AXD DEFENCE 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 
R.M.C. ACT 

I understand that the necessary revision of the E.M.C. Act is at the moment in 
abeyance, but presume the matter will be taken up in due couree. 

The revision of the Act is very necessary and should be completed as soon as pos- 
sible. 

TRAINING AND EDUCATION 

(A) Report of the Director of Studies 

The Eoyal Military College of Canada was established by Act of Parliament of 
Canada to provide for a scientific education required by a military officer. Such an 
education was revealed during the last war to demand great scientific principles which 
might be applied in detail to many varieties of aggi-essive activities. The ultimate 
success which was achieved in this clash of powers was materially contributed to by 
the scientifically educated members of the many university graduates whose laboratory 
training was volunteered to our great advantage. The mental acuteness needed to 
combat a vigorous and unscrupulous enemy, educated scientifically to a high degree, 
was very conspicuous, and the academic training our officers got at their universities 
and other centres of scientific culture was a grand asset. 

Inspired by the experience we have gained quite recently, we have designed our 
educational course, which at least will aim at laying the foundation for such a mental 
development as may be needed in our future conflicts. 

The youth of Canada in attendance here are of that age when they should have 
that education which will make of them first, good citizens, for a good soldier should 
be first and foremost a good citizen. The intelligence with which he is endowed should 
be developed as far as possible by keeping its possessor busy at the mental gymnastics 
best suited for the needs of his military vocation. He should be taught to read intelli- 
gently and write and speak coherently. He should be taught to reason logically and 
observe accurately. He should assemble his facts gained and deduce the general prin- 
ciple to which they lead. He should recognize the great importance of preparation of. 
data before he proceeds to a solution of a problem with which he is confronted. He 
should think before he acts and seek a perspective view of his difficulties, ere he 
attempts the elimination thereof. 

All of the operations which are in the hands of an officer in the pursuit of his 
vocation involve a power of mind best prepared by a scientific training, and the sub- 
jects which we have included in our curriculum are best suited to this ideal. They 
not only have a practical application to the needs of ordinary civil life, but they are 
theoretically useful in training the mental powers of those whose responsibility is great 
indeed 

We abhor a " Rule of Thumb," so frequently considered in the past as all that 
" I ever had any use for." We have heard it said by officers of the scientific divisions 
of the Service, " Why have so much mathematics ? Why so much chemistry ? Why 
so much engineering for a man who is to follow the soldierman's job ?" If such obser- 
vations are made by gentlemen who occupy positions of prestige, by virtue of that 
prestige only they will have a baneful influence upon the efforts of our academic 
potentialities. 

We feel the time is past, however, when the Gentlemen Cadets will be taught by 
members of the staff here whose scientific accomplishments are not up to the standard 
of fitrst-class all-round educationalists ; whose only aim is to " educate " the Gentle- 
man Cadet by indicating to him the prime importance of deducing and applying the 
great commanding general principle universally applicable to problems of various 
kinds with suitable data at hand. 

The assembling of a set of " formulae," mere skeletons, stripped of all fleeh and 
blood, and lacking in vitality and headless and heartless, is reprehensible and detri- 



DKl'Airi'MHXr (IF Ml 1. 1 11 A AND DEFENCE 



87 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 



mental to the young student, the evidence of which is constantly appearing to the 
teacher in misapplications by him of the mere formulae. 

I have done my best to impress these notions on those members of the StafiE whose 
experience so far may not have been sufficiently extensive to impel them to this con- 
clusion. The usual answer to my suggestion is : " Oh, we haven't the time for that 
perfect system " ; but we must not lose what time we have to the detriment of the 
embryonic mentality. We aim at a developing idea rather than a demolishing one. 

I am compelled to the conclusion that all the members of our Educational StafE 
are giving to the work their conecientious endeavour and if they are not eSective, it 
must be due to the unsuitability of the incumbent for the position which he is holding. 
It is not given to every man of university standing to " teach," and on the staff of 
an educational institution, only those should be retained whose teaching capabilities 
justify his retention. He should be satisfied with the principles of his subject. He 
should be effective and enthusiastic in the presentation of those principles. It is not 
sufficient, for instance, that he should know his subject practically and lack the theory 
thereof. A great lawyer may not have the faculty of conveying to others the under- 
lying principles of his success. A great engineer may be practical, but on the staff of 
an educational scientific school he might not have the patience indispensable to a 
successful pedagogue and he would thus contribute to the public opinion that would 
make us the scorn of the scholastic world. 

I regret that during the past year, in addition to our inadequate accommodation 
of class-rooms and laboratories, we were unable to secure suitable occupants for posi- 
tions on our Staff. To complete the Mathematical Department we require two appoint- 
ments. In the Department of Physics and Chemistry we need two appointments, and 
the need of these necessary members made the res-poneibilities of the heads of these 
important departments very great indeed and at times disheartening. 

We now have the first half of the new Educational building ready for use and 
hope to have the above-mentioned instructors appointed shortly. 

I wish to thank the Commandant for the hearty support he has invariably accorded 
me in my endeavours, and the Staff for the loyal support they have given in attempting 
to carry out the educational aims indicated. 

(B) Training 

We have continued on the lines laid down last year with considerable success. 
The mutual instruction introduced has borne good fruit. Every effort has been made 
to give the Cadets confidence, self-reliance and ability in instructing others. The 
Graduating Class in this respect has made tremendous strides and the confidence with 
which they handle other Cadets in cavalry, artillery, infantry, and engineer drill is 
gratifying. 

I have again to record our thanks to Major-General Sir E. W. B. Morrison, 
K.C.M.G., C.B., D.S.O., and to Brig.-General W. B. King, C.M.G., D.S.O., for the 
great assistance which I have received at all times from them in anything regarding 
the College, and who co-operated with Lt.-Colonel W. H. P. Elkins, D.S.O., and the 
Royal Canadian Horse Artillery in courteously and kindly helping us out with horses 
for our " Cavalry Week " and "Artillery Week." 

Brig.-General W. B. King, C.M.G., D.S.O., Commanding Military District ISTo. 
3, has placed the Drill Shed in the Armoury at the disposal of the Gentlemen Cadets 
and has made arrangements for the Staff and Gentlemen Cadets to be represented on 
the various Staff Tours organized in the District to their great benefit. In many ways 
he has shown a desire to assist the College to the fullest possible extent. 

"Artillery Week," "Cavalry Week," and the "Trek" proved a great success and 
will be repeated again this year. Owing to circumstances which cannot be controlled, 
we will only be able to have fifty-six horses for "Cavalry Week" this spring, but 



88 DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AXD DEFENCE 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

arrangements have been made for the Gentlemen Cadets to drill as a firing battery 
complete during Artillery Week. 

The trek last year was of the greatest value. Lt.-Colonel Cameron, Lt.-Colonel 
Scroggie and Major Jeffrey threw themselves inio the work with tremendous zeal and 
the practical experience gained by tlie Gentlemen Cadets will undoubtedly be of im- 
mense value to them both in civil and military life. 

Every opportunity is given to the members of the Senior Class to become efficient 
Troop Leaders, Battery Section Commanders, Platoon Commanders and Section 
Commanders (Engineers), before graduation, and it is confidently hoped they will 
prove of real value and assistance to the Militia units in which they have the honour 
to receive Commissions. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING 

The system of physical training at the College has reached a very high standard 
and the exercises of the Gentlemen CadeU evoke unstinted admiration from all 
visitors to the College who are privileged to see them in this subject. 

The marked improvements in the physique of the Gentlemen Cadets, as shown in 
the report of the Medical Officer on a previous page, must be attributed to a large 
extent to the instruction imparted in physical training. 

One of the great aims of the Eoyal Military College is to be of very real assistance 
to the Canadian Militia, and with this end in view a Physical Training Course was 
organized, under the administration of Lieut. S. C. Cutbush, A.P.T.S., Superintendent 
of Physical Training at the College, for the purpose of training non-commissioned 
officers of the Canadian Permanent Militia as Physical Training Instructors. 

The various units in Eastern Canada sent detachments to the CoUege whilst the 
Gentlemen Cadets were on their vacation period, and as thorough a course as could 
be given in the time was imparted, with the principal aim of training instructors 
in this work. 

"Physical Training Instructors' Certificates" were given to those qualifying at 
the examinations, and in the autumn those receiving certificates again reported at 
the College for a Refresher Course. 

In this manner, a certain amount of assistance was given to the Canadian Militia, 
and it is hoped that it may gradually be extended, until the Royal Military College 
is closely allied with the Militia in everything which pertains to its welfare: our 
desire being to help in every possible way. 

RIDING AND RIDIXG ESTABLISHMENT 

Full advantage has been taken of outside work for riding instruction when the 
weather permitted, and the jumping courses in the open were utilized whenever 
possible. 

The Senior Class has been thoroughly instructed in sword drill, ceremonial, 
troop squadron and regimental drill, mounted, and additional instruction has been 
given in the use of the sword and lance when motmted. The regular instruction in 
riding, vaulting and jumping has been carried out. 

The remainder of the Gentleman Cadets have received instruction in riding 
proportionate to their progress in this subject, and in some instances have been 
instructed in the use of the sword and lance, both mounted and dismounted. 

Excellent progress has been made with the Recruit Class in riding, and they are 
now able to ride, with or without reins over the leaping bars, have a good balance and 
fair control. They are not yet sufficiently good horsemen to ride a horse bited and 
handle arms, mounted, but I have every confidence that during the next term they 
will rapidly improve upon the solid foundation which they have now received. 



DEl'ARTMEST OF MllJTI.l AMJ UEFENCE 89 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 3e 

It will eventually become necessary, with our large classes, to have the Riding 
Establishment increased so that all members of a class can ride at the same time. 
To split up classes entails extra lectures and extra rides, thus just doubling the work 
of both the Superior Staff and the Hiding Establishment, and is a situation which 
was remedied by the use of twenty horses, on charge to the lioyal Canadian Horse 
Artillery, being placed at my disposal. This has helped us immeasurably, though it 
undoubtedly will become necessary to enlarge our Eiding Establishment. 

Detachments of the Gentlemen Cadets attended the Picton and Kingston Indus- 
trial Exhibitions, where they went through a "Musioal Kide" and many complimentary 
remarks have been made by both press and public regarding the efficiency they 
displayed on these occasions. I feel that incidents of this nature add much to the 
popularity of the Eoyal Military College, and make it more widely known throughout 
the Dominion; and I sincerely trust that the department will place every facility for 
communities to be given in this manner, a practical demonstration of the efficient 
system of training at this institution. 

May I bring to your notice the very capable work performed by Captain H. F. 
Bvay, R.C.H.A., Hiding Master. He is an accomplished horseman and a lover of 
animals, and is an ideal type of officer to instruct the Gentlemen Cadets in horseman- 
ship and horse management. He has brought the Riding Establishment to a high 
state of efficiency. 

MUSKETRY 

A sound and efficient Musketry Course has been established at the College, tha 
recruits being gradually trained in elementary musketry, aiming and firing instruction, 
and finally passing a modified Young Soldiers' Course; and graded progress being 
raad<i with the other claeses, the Senior Class receiving Lewis gun and machine gun 
training, revolver training and passing an advanced course in musketry in their final 
term. 

The system adopted has been very carefully prepared by Major J. JefFery, O.B.E., 
M.C., the E.C.R., himself a keen and an expert marksman, and who has been untiring 
in his efforts to encourage markmanship at the College. The work performe'd by 
Major J. Jefiery is deserving of the highest praise. He has interested the Superior 
Staff, Gentlemen Cadets, Subordinate Staff and the Riding Establishment in rifle 
shooting and has brought the whole College to a standard of efficiency which I venture 
to state it has never before attained. His services and his enthusiasm have been 
invaluable to us. 

During the period November to April, spoon shoots were held on the Miniature 
Range for both .22 and .303 Gallery practices. Decimal, Figure and Solano targets 
were used for application, rapid-fire and snapshooting. 

The College Rifle Club entered three teams in the .32 Competition of the Canadian 
Rifle League, ten marksmen being on each team. I am pleased to report that the 
1st Team secured first place in this competition with 3,922 points out of a possible 
4,000, winning the Dominion Cartridge Company's Challenge Shield, one special 
trophy, one special spoon, seven first-class spoons and twenty-one second-class spoons. 

The Club entered two teams in the .303 Competition of the Canadian Rifle League, 
ten marksmen being on each team. It is encouraging to report that the 1st Team 
secured second place in this competition, with 3,687 points out of a possible 4,000, 
winning one first-class spoon and fifteen second-class spoon. 

One team of eight Gentlemen Cadets under eighteen years of age have been 
entered in the Imperial Challnge Shield Competition to be fired in June. Up to date, 
the practices have been very satisfactory. 

The Inter-College Rifle and Revolver Competition between R.M.C. Canada and 
R.M.C. Sandhurst, will be fired late in June. 



gp DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 



12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

May I again bring to your notice the kindness of the Governments of the 
provinces of Ontario and Quebec, who have each continued this year their grant to the 
Eifle Club of $100. The record of the Club as shown above would appear to justify 
the confidence shown in them by the Governments of these two provinces. 

SERVANTS 

In my report for 1920, it was strongly recommended that all servants should be 
placed on a military basis and be "On Command" to the K.M.G. for duty as servants, 
and I beg to reiterate this recommendation. 

The advantage of having the servants on a military basis would be primarily 
from a disciplinary point of view, and it would be quite immaterial 'whether they 
were members of a departmental unit of the Canadian Permanent Force, or of a 
unit of the Non-Permanent Active Militia. 

BXJILDINGS 

The situation at the Eoyal Military College of Canada is such that new candi- 
dates can only be accepted as the present Gentlemen Cadets leave or graduate. Each 
year, the College is filled to capacity, more candidates passing the Entrance Examin- 
ations than existing vacancies. 

This year fifty-six Gentlemen Cadets will graduate, and therefore we will be able 
to accept fifty-SLx of the successful candidates writing on the Entrance Examination. 

Next Year only thirty-nine Cadets will graduate and the number of vacancies at 
the College will be governed accordingly. 

In the following year, 1923, only fifteen Gentlemen Cadets will graduate, and 
unices action is taken towards the erection of dormitory accommodation in the near 
future, only fifteen of the successful candidates can be admitted to the Institution. 

It would seem reasonable to expect that all those candidates who successfully pass 
the Entrance Examination to Canada's National Institution should be afforded an 
opportunity for entering upon its Course of Instruction, and it is therefore imper- 
ative that the Fort Frederick Dormitory building should be completed by the addition 
of two wings without any delay, in order that accommodation may be provided for 
the new students who will undoubtedly wish to take advantage of the training at the 
College during the next few years. 

Experience has proved that the numbers writing on the E.M.C. Entrance Examin- 
ation do not fluctuate much but that there is a steady stream of successful candidates 
each year of between fifty and sixty in number anxious to join the College. The 
problem is to provide accommodation for fifty-five Cadets {at least) entering in 1922 
and the same number in 1923. 

Thus, during the years 1922 and 1923, one hundred and ten is the minimum 
number who will wish to enter, and only fifty-four vacancies will occur through thy 
graduation of the present Gentlemen Cadets; and this, notwithstanding that the 
College is steadily gaining in popularity throughout the Dominion. 

On completion of the wings, it will become necessary to build a Messroom, capable 
of seating 300 Cadets, together with a Gymnasium, etc., after which the completion 
of the new Educational building, and the second new Dormitory building to be built 
may be considered. 

A drill shed is urgently required, but accommodation for the Cadets is the 
supreme necessity and must first receive consideration. 

On February 25, 1921, the west half of the new educational building was formally 
taken over. The following is an extract of the proceedings of the Board of Officers : — 

" The Board find that, with few exceptions, which have been taken into con- 
sideration, and which will be attended to by the contractors, the building is 
entirely suitable for the purpose for which it was built, and corresponds to the 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE gi 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

plans and specifications as approved by the Department of Militia and Defence, 
and that the contractors have carried out their work in an eminently satisfac- 
tory manner." 

The lighting contract is being completed, and I understand that an estimate has 
been passed to install the necessary furnishings. Several of the Superior Staff have 
already occupied their new offices. 

Owing to the fact the increased accommodation is available in the new Educa- 
tional building, we shall be able to appropriate one class-room for an over-flow mess- 
room which will hold the same number of cadets as the present mess-room, until the 
new mess-room mentioned above is built. 

The completion of half of the new Educational building has provided accommo- 
dation in the old Administrative building for a Superior Staff Mess and a Subordinate 
Staff Mess, both of which were urgently required. 

TRALNING GROUND 

We have been allotted a stretch of ground by Navy Bay running down to Dead- 
man's bay, and the high ground in the vicinity of and including Eort Henry. The 
difficulty is its accessibility, and the Cadets are building a pontoon bridge in order 
that the ground may be used for training this year. 

Under the heading "Improvements" wiH be noticed my hope that some day there 
will be a causeway connecting the College with the ground on the opposite side of 
Navy bay. 

The ground given to the College is of immense value for instructional work, and 
will greatly improve the training imparted at the Institution. 

BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

In my report of last year it was suggested that the College has reached such a 
stage that it might be probably in its best interests to have a Board of Governors 
appointed so as to ensure a continuity of policy from one Commandant to another. 

It has been suggested that the Governing Board should be modelled somewhat on 
the lines of our larger universities, and in this suggestion I concur. 

The matter is still in abeyance, and an early decision would be appreciated. 

The Board of Visitors will again act this year. 

I understand that Sir Robert Falconer has informed the department that he will 
be unable to be present this year with the Board of Visitors. For two years the 
College has enjoyed the inestimable advantage of having this distinguished and eminent 
educationalist as Chairman of the Board of Visitors, and I take this opportunity 
of tendering to him the sincere and grateful thanks of all ranks at the Eoyal Military 
College for the masterly and sympathetic manner in which he discharged his duties 
to the great benefit and furthering of the efficiency of the R.M.C. of Canada. We 
all feel that in Sir Robert we have a friend indeed. 

HISTORICAL RECORDS 

It is gratifying to report that authority has been received for the new Assembly 
Hall in the Educational building to be known as "The Sir Arthur Currie Hall," in 
honour of the victorious native-born Commander of the Canadian Corps, General 
Sir Arthur W. Currie, G.C.M.G., K.C.B., etc. 

His Majesty the King has very graciously presented signed engravings of Their 
Majesties to be placed in The Sir Arthur Currie Hall, where they will receive the 
most prominent position. 



92 DEPARTIIENT OF MILITIA AND DEFEyCE 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

Major Stuart Forbes, D.S.O., as his free gift to the College, has kindly offered 
to paint the oak panels which surround the Hall with the badge, battle-patch, number 
and name of every unit which was serving on the Western front on ^November 11, 
1918, as a representative of Canada. 

This step is being taken to perpetuate in the Sir Arthur Currie Hall the glorious 
traditions of the Canadian Corps; that the regiments which formed part of that 
galaxy of fighting men may not be forgotten by the generations of the future, but 
that there may be one place in Canada where the remembrance of them will be 
treasured forever. It is also felt that no greater incentive or inspiration could be 
given the Gentlemen Cadets of the Royal Military College of Canada than the sight 
of the emblems worn by the Canadian Corns. 

I am hoping to obtain a grant of $3,000 from the Government of Canada for the 
purpose of commemorating the work of Canadians, and the gallant deeds of our own 
ex-cadets (14S of whom paid the supreme sacrifice) in the late and previous wars. 

I have noticed in the press that <a Committee of the Government of the province 
of Ontario have suggested the Royal Military College as one of the suitable places 
in Ontario where a memorial might be erecTed to the sons of that province who died 
in France. May I urge that the Dominion Government should now assume the initia- 
tive by inviting the Government of the province of Ontario to utilize the College 
grounds for this purpose. Every facility will be given them by the College author- 
ities, for it would seem that the Royal Military College of Canada is the natural 
repository for such a memorial. 

ATTACHED OFFICERS 

When the Attached Officers' Courses recommence in October, the College will be 
in an even better position to give the assistance to the Active Militia for which we 
strive. 

It would seem essential that consideration should immediately be given the 
question of where the Attached Officers will live during their course at the College, 
and I would strongly recommend that quarters be alloted to them within a reasonable 
distance of the College, so that they may be members of the Superior Staff Mess, 
have the use of our reference library, see the activities of the Gentlemen Cadets, 
and come into close personal contact with their own Professors and Instructors. 

I regard it as of great importance that the Attached Officers should live in close 
proximity to the College and thus absorb the atmosphere of the Institution and the 
spirit and ideals of the place. 

I am hoping that eventually Fort Henry may be utilized as quarters for the 
Attached Officers and it will be the psychological place for them to be billetted when 
the much desired causeway is built connecting the College with the opposite side of 
Navy bay. The necessary mess-rooms, reading rooms and sleeping accommodation 
would be provided for them in the Fort at comparatively small expense. 

IMPERUL COMMISSIONS 

I have much pleasure in announcing that an Army Order has been issued by 
the War Office granting all graduates of the College who take Commissions in the 
Imperial Army one year's ante-date. 

CUPS AND TROPHIES 

As a result of the College competing in the Canadian Rifle League during the 
season 1919-20, we won the Lt.-Col. Edwards Cup for Gallery Practice, and came 
second during the present season 1920-21. 



DEPARTMEyr OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 93 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

Major J. Jeffrey, O.B.E., M.C., the R.C.E., of the College Staff at the Dominion 
Rifle Association meet last year, won. the Harold Borden Trophy, which has been 
retained amongst the cups at the College during the last year. I am very pleased 
to be able to report that Militia Headquartin-s has given authority for all the Bexhill 
trophies to be handed over to the Royal Military College of Canada. These trophies 
were competed for by members of the Canadian Expeditionary Force at the Canadian 
Training School, Bexhill, England, during the late war, and it seems peculiarly 
appropriate that they should be handed to the Royal Military College of Canada, 
where they will continue to act as an incentive to the Gentlemen Cadets, who will 
strive for the honour of being, year by year, the winners of the various Bexhill 
trophies. The trophies will be formally handed to the College on June 3, by Brig.- 
General J. A. Gunn, C.M.G., D.S.O. 

As a result of competing in the Canadian Rifle League during the season 1920-21, 
we won the Dominion Cartridge Company's Challenge Shield for .22 Miniature 
Practice, open to the Dominion. 

IMPROVEMENTS TO COLLEGE 

I wish to make the report on improvements to the College under certain definite 
and prescribed headings, as follows : — • 

(a) Improvements actually imdor way. 

(li) Improvements projected, which can actually be carried out by the College 

Staff, as funds are available, 
(c) Large improvements, which can only be done with outside assistance, and 

which would materially expedite the instructional efficiency of the College 

and assist the Canadian Militia generally. 

I would like to bring attention to the work of Captain F. Yokes, R.C.E., who has 
been indefatigable in endeavouring to improve the College grounds, and who has 
carried out his responsibilities as District Officer, R.C.E., in an able and efficient 
manner. 

The College grounds are capable of being made so beautiful that I feel constrained 
to reiterate the request of a previous Commandant as to the urgent necessity of 
obtaining the services of a landscape engineer to formulate a scheme for laying out 
the College grounds for future development and to make them, as they could easily 
be made, the beauty spot of Canada. 

(A) Improvements Actually Under Way 

Memorial Arch. — A sum of money has been subscribed through the medium of 
the R.M.C. Ex-Cadets' Club for the purpose of commemorating, by a Memorial Arch, 
the services of graduates and ex-Cadets in the late and previous wars. 

The design for the Arch was selected after competition by noted Canadian archi- 
tects, and has been favourably commented upon wherever it has been exhibited. 

There is a general feeling at the College that the Arch should not be placed at 
the gateway to the College grounds, but should be placed at a point some distance 
down the drive; and it has been suggested that it might with advantage be erected 
near the small Observatory on a high point of ground and that the drive from the 
outer gate should be made perfectly straight, passing under the archway. Thus the 
visitors to the College would, on entering the main driveway, proceed along a straight 
roadway, on the highest point of which would be the Memorial Arch, which would be 
viewed to great advantage as the conveyance moved up the graded ground towards it. 
Should this plan be adopted, the main road in front of the Educational building and 
the Administrative building would be straightened, and pass through the wall of the 



94 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 



12 GEORGE V. A. 1922 



inner enclosure, curving after passing through it and connecting with the main drive- 
way. The visitors, therefore, after passing through the archway, would on making 
the slight curve come immediately within sight of the College buildings. 

This action would also enable the Arch to be seen from Kingston and from the 
water in every direction. It would be visible from the LaSalle causeway, and would 
give a wonderful approach to the College precincts from the outer gate, as it would 
be in the distance on a perfectly straight and graded road, looming in a majestic 
manner as the visitors drew nearer and nearer to it. 

The reason this is brought to notice is that it would entail an alteration of the 
existing College roads. 

Names. — The following names have been suggested for the roads at the College: — 

Frontenac Avenue. — The main road running from LaSalle causeway to Educa- 
tional building to be known as Frontenac Avenue, in honour of Count Frontenac, 
Governor of French Canada and the original founder of Fort Frontenac, and there- 
fore of Kingston, 16Y3. 

Mackenzie Avenue. — The main road running past the Riding Establishment to 
be Mackenzie Avenue, in honour of the Honourable Alexander Mackenzie, Prime 
Minister of Canada, 1873-78, and founder of the College, 1876. 

Lundy's Lane. — The first road running east and west after entering Frontenac 
Avenue, and leading to Superior Staff Quarters, to be called Lundy's Lane, to com- 
memorate the battle of Lundy's Lane, 1813. 

De Verehere's Driveway. — The second road running east and west after entering 
Frontenac Avenue, and leading to Company Commander's Quarters, to be named De 
Verehere's Driveway, in honour of Mademoiselle Madeleine de Verehere's heroic 
defence against the Iroquois. 

Chateaugnay Drive. — The third road running east and wester after entering 
Frontenac Avenue, and leading to Commandant's Quarters, to be named Chateaugnay 
Drive, to commemorate the Battle of Chateauguay, 1814. 

Queenston Heights Drive. — The short road off Mackenzie Avenue, and past the 
Holt Rink, to be named Queenston Heights Drive, to commemorate the Battle of 
Queenston Heights, September 13, 1812. 

Vimy Ridge Place. — The beauty spot behind the Educational Building to be 
known as Vimy Ridge Place, in honour of the Battle of Vimy Ridge, April 9, 1917. 

Byng Avenue. — The driveway which encircles Vimy Ridge Place to be known as 
Byng Avenue, in honour of General J. H. G., Lord Byng, G.C.B., etc., who com- 
manded the Canadian Corps at Vimy. 

Amiens Avenue. — The roadway in front of Fort Frederick Dormitory to be known 
as Amiens Avenue, to commemorate the Battle of Amiens, August 8-9, 1918, according 
to Ludendorff " the black day for the German Army." 

Hewett Avenue. — The road which passes in front of the H.M.S. Stone Frigate 
and Staff Adjutant's Quarters to be known as Hewett Avenue, in honour of Lieut. - 
General E. O. Hewett, C.M.G., R.E., first Conunandant of the College, 1875-86. 

Passchendaele Avenue. — The road connecting Amiens Avenue and Hewett 
Avenue, and which passes behind the Lunette of Fort Frederick, to commemorate the 
capture of Passchendaele Ridge, October and November, 1917, by the Canadian Corps. 

Sanctuary Wood Place. — The beauty spot at the extreme end of Mackenzie 
Avenue, near Fort Frederick, to commemorate the Battle of Sanctuary Wood, June, 
1916. 

Hill 70 Plateau. — The high ground to the south of the Commandant's Quarters, 
to commemorate the capture of Hill 70 by the 1st and 2nd Canadian Divisions, August 
15, 1917. 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AS J) DEFENCE 95 

SESvSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

St. Juliiin Place, Langeiiiaarek I'lace, Gravenstafaal Ridge. — These places are 
situated on the right liand side of Front^nac Road, where it is proposed to erect the 
names indicated, in comnienioration of the battles which composed the Second Battle 
of Ypres, the battle which placed the Canadian troops in one bound as, not only poten- 
tiall.v, but actually, fighting men of the first rank. 

There are many more roads and places to be opened up which will receive other 
historic names, euch as Paardeburg, etc., etc., which do not appear in the above list. 

(B) ImTprovements Projected 

On all these roads great improvements have been made. A great deal of sodding 
has been done just north of Holt Rink, and a great deal of filling has be«n carried 
out on the west side of Holt Rink, which will also be sodded in the near future. 

Byng Avenue has been actually cut and filled with stone, and should be completed 
at an early date. 

On Queenston Heights Drive a great deal of work has been done towards filling 
the east side of the wall opposite the Holt Rink and where it is proposed the new tennis 
courts shall be constructed. 

On the continuation of Mackenzie Avenue, after it crosses Frontenac, we have 
planted many trees, and have planted all along the wall, at distances of thirty yarde, 
a creeper of rapid growth which should beautify the already jjicturesque surroundings. 

We have made arrangements with a contractor of the Ontario Road Commission 
to deposit his debris on the north end of Navy Bay with a view to filling it in and 
making a fine boulevard where a marsh now exists. Negotiations are now in progress 
with the city to secure ashes for this purpose, and there are a number of places where 
it is proposed to fill in gradually and gain a great deal of ground; notably, on the nortli 
side of Queenston Heights Drive to the end of the college wall, and to the north of 
the gun shed and the little hay to the north of it. 

It is hoped from the debris of the wings of the Fort Frederick Dormitory to fill 
in on the west side of Mackenzie Avenue and thus retrieve the ground worn away by 
the action of ice and water. 

It is also hoped to do a certain amount of filling at the commencement of 
Frontenac Avenue near the main gate as far as the Commandant's boat-house. We 
are in great danger of losing several fine trees there unless this action is taken in the 
near future. 

The rough pasture field at the back of the Commandant's house has been 
ploughed and it i? proposed to construct a lane connecting it with the Riding School 
field. It will thus give the college a good field for mounted drill, and can eventually 
be used for a football field. 

On my recent visit to the United States Military Academy at West Point, T 
noticed that the names of the various commandants are perpetuated by being carved on 
buildings which surround the parade ground, the Administration building being thei 
one chiefly used for this purpose. Action of this nature in connection with the Royal 
Military College is suggested, since it would naturally add to the interest of the 
institution and maintain its history. 

(C) Large Improvements 

An improvement which would give one of the most wonderful driveways in 
Canada would be the construction of a boulevard extending from Mackenzie Avenue, 
running outside Fort Frederick, thence close along the water's edge, behind the power- 
house, g,ymnasium, and Stone Frigate, out onto the reef which runs north-easterly 
into Navy Bay, then curving to the right and carrying the causeway about sixty yards' 
to the north of the western Martello Tower, on to Fort Henry; thence up the hill 
and joining the main road to the fort. After passing right round Fort Heni-y, it 



96 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 



12 GEORGE V. A. 1922 



would proceed along Deadman's 'Bay, following the boundary of the college to the 
Gananoqup Road. 

This beautiful Causeway would present to the -visitor in succession the following' 
scenes : — 

(a) The ex-Cadets' Memorial Arch, erected by the ex-Cadets to the memory of 
their comrades who died in the recent and previous wars, the cost of the Memorial 
being about $75,000. 

(b) The visitors would then pass along the College Drive, furnishing one of 
the finest views of old and historic Kingston which it is possible to obtain. 

(c) Passing round the Outer Enclosure of the College, the visitor would see 
on his left Fort Frederick ilartello Tower, the best preserved tower in the country; 
and on his right a beautiful panorama of Lake Ontario. 

(d) Then Cedar Island with its old tower comes into prominence, followed by 
a wonderful perspective of old historic Fort Henry. 

(e) Finally the College looms into sight in tlie most attractive and delightful 
manner it is possible to see it 

(f) The visitors would then apjiroaeh Fort Henry, passing right around it, taking 
a road paralleling Deadman's Bay, a jivetty ba.v with an old legend regarding treasure 
galleons; and passing through delightful scenery and innumerable picturesque views, 
would evetuall.y join the Gananoque Road. 

The whole area is crowded with past historic events, from the time of Frontenac's 
lauding at Kingston to the present day, and I am strongly convinced that such an 
improvement would be a wonderful asset to the Province of Ontario and to the 
Dominion. 

One of the benefits which would accrue to the Militia at large through the 
construction of this roadway, would be that the Attached Officers at the College could 
reside at Fort Henry and have the advantages of the Superior Staff Mess, being 
always in close touch with College activities, and near the College Reference Library. 

Fort Frederich. — I have had Fort Frederick carefully examined and it has been 
deemed by those most capable of judging that it would make a splendid Cadet 
Museum and Observatory but unless it can be done by private subscription or without- 
expense to the Government, I am afraid that several years must elapse before the 
matter can be even thought of, but at least the building should be prevented from 
falling to pieces. 

It seems a cause for sincere regTet that a building of this nature, erected on 
solid rock and with a concrete shaft running through the centre, should not be 
utilized for educational purposes, when it is so advantageously sited and suitably 
constructed for observator.v work. 

The matter will be brought to the attention of the Visiting Board with the request 
that they submit a recommendation to the Government. 

LIAISON \VITII OTHCR INSTITUTIONS 

The Colonel Lafferty Cup 

Mrs. F. D. Lafferty, widow of the late Colonel F. D. Lafferty, a distinguished 
graduate of the Royal Military College and a former Staff Adjutant of the College, 
has very kindly offered to give a cup in memory of her late husband in competition 
between the following institutions: The Royal ililitary College, Sandhurst: the 
Royal Military Academy, Woolwich; the Royal Military College of Australia: the 
Royal Military College of Canada, and such other institutions of a like nature that 
may be founded from time to time. 

The competition will be of an athletic nature, the times made in the different 
racee being cabled, and the winning coUege will have the name engraved on the cup 
annually. 



i)Ki'AitrMi:\r or uiLiri\ wit dih-'unve c,7 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

[ am moro than gralilieil lliat siicli a prci|iosal for liaisou between these institu- 
tions should liave originated at Iho lloyal Military College of Canada, and that the 
tr(jphy should he instituted in memory of so gallant an officer and so true a friend 
as Colonel F. I). Lafferty. 

West Point Militanj Academy 

In November, 1920, I had the honour and pleasure of visiting the United States 
Military Academy at West Point, N.Y., U.S.A. 

A full report of this visit has been siuit forward to Militia Headquarters, but I 
would like to bring to the notice of the Board, the great value which this visit was 
to the members of the Staff who accompanied me, and to myself. 

We were able to get in touch with the aims and methods in use at the United 
States Military Academy. The Superintendent and his Staff were most kind and we 
were cordially welcomed, comfortably accommodated and every effort obtained to 
make our visit pleasant and profitable. 

I pointed out in my report that no expense appears to have been spared at that 
Institution to provide all the necessary buildings and equipment. 

It was most interesting to learn of their systems of academic work, although on 
the whole it is considered to be too rigid and inelastic. 

Their sports are well organized and every Cadet must take part and at the same 
time must understand the principles of the games, and must be able to referee. 

In my reports to Militia Headquarters, I recommended that every means ijossible 
should be taken to increase the liaison between the Academy and this College. General 
MacArthur, the Superintendent, appeared to be most anxious to take any steps that 
would encourage this liaison and suggested that fifteen of our Cadets should be sent 
to the West Point Summer Camp and be attached there for a short period. Unfor- 
tunaiely these arrangements could not be effected. 

I hope, however, that should there be any opportunity in the future to arrange 
anything of this nature that the necessary authority may be granted. 

I was most favourably impressed with all I saw and was grateful to have had 
the opportunity of visiting this Institution. 

VISITOKS 

In June, 1920, His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario honoured the 
College by attending the June Ball with his family, and later by presenting the 
diplomas and prizes on Diploma Day, when many distinguished visitors were present. 

During the year, the following visited the College: — - 

The Eight Honourable Arthur Meighen, Prime Minister. 

The Honourable Hugh Guthrie, Minister of 'Militia. 

The Honourable 0. C. Ballantyne, Minister of Naval ^Services. 

The Honourable J. D. Eeid, Minister of Railways and Canals. 

Brig.-General W. A. Griesbach, C.B., C.M.G., D.S.O., M.P. 

Major A. M. Mowat, M.P. 

Major-General the Honourable J. E. B. Seeley, C.B., C.M.G., D.S.O. 

The members of the International Waterways Commission. 

Major-General Sir E. W. B. Morrison, K.C.M.G., C.K, D.S.O. 

Major-General J. H. MacBrien, C.B., C.M.G., D.S.O. 

Major-General E. C. Ashton, C.M.G. 

General Sir Arthur W. Currie, G.C.M.G., K.CB. 

Commissioner A. B. Perry, C.M.G., Royal Canadian Mounted Police. 

Brig.-General W. B. Leslie, C.B., C.M.G., R.E. 

Dr. W. Grenfell of the Labrador. 



A. C. MAODONNELL, Major-General, 
Commandant, The Royal Military College of Canada. 



■id— 7 



98 DEPART.UE\T OF MIUII I .1-YD DEFENCE 

12 GEORGE V. A. 1922 

APPENDIX G 

EOYAL MELITAEY COLLEGE— EEPORT OF THE BOAED OF VISITORS. 

1921 

The Board assembled at the Eoyal Military College on Friday, June 3, 1921. 

CAoirman.— General Sir A. W. Currie, G.C.M.G., KC.B., etc., etc. 

Memhers. — Colonel Sir John Hendi-ie, K.C.M.G., C.V.O.; Commissioner A. B. 
Perrv, C.M.G., R.C.M.P.; Brig.-Geueral W. A. Griesbach, C.B., C.M.G., D.S.O., 
M.P."; Lt.-Col. F. Wanklyn; Lt.-Col. W. B. Kiugsmill, D.S.O.; Colonel C. L. Panet 
(representing the Deputy Minister) ; Colonel J. Sutherland Brown, C.M.G., B.S.O. 
(representing the C.G.S.) ; Colonel W. Gibsone, C.M.G., D.S.O., O.B.E. 

Secretary.— Ca^t. Stuart C. Bate, the E.C.E. 

The following members were unavoidably absent, and expressed their regrets at 
not being able to attend: E. W. Beatty, Esq., K.C.; Hector Melnnes, Esq., K.C.; Sir 
Augustus Xanton, K.B.; Colonel A. Z. Palmer, C.M.G.; Dr. A. C. Mackay, Sir F. 
Williams-Taylor, Hon. Lt.-Col. the Eev. Monsignor G. Dauth. 

The Board assembled at the College at 3.30 p.m. on the date mentioned and were 
met by the Commandant and members of the Staff. 

Owing to the inclemency of the weather, the progranmic. a>i >nbniirtfil by the 
Commandant for the Board of Visitors, was altered. 

1. Examination for Entrance 

The Board of Visitors is of the opinion that the Eoyal Military College, under the 
Department of Militia and Defence, has' a perfect right to set the standard of its own 
entrance examination, but is of the opinion that this should correspond as nearly as 
possible with the matriculation of the universities of Canada, and that if a case should 
arise when there were not sufficient successful candidates who passed the Eoyal Mili- 
tary College examination, that the matriculation examination of the universities of 
Canada would be accepted. 

The Board feels that the time has not yet arrived when proportional representation 
by provinces of Canada, as recommended by the Board of Visitors for 1920, should be 
instituted. 

2. Graduates Obtaining 75 per cent and over to be Admitted to Fourth Year of 

Uno'ersities 

The Board approves of the suggestion of the Conmiandant that the universities of 
Canada should be approached with a view to ascertaining whether the graduates of the 
Eoyal Military College, who have obtained a To per cent or over standard, could not be 
admitted into the fourth year of the Canadian universities iii«tpa<i of tlie third. 

3. Academic Board, E.M.C. 

The Board approved of the steps taken by the Commandant in appointing an 
Academic Board at the College, which is composed of the Director of Studies as chair- 
man, and the heads of each branch as members. This Academic Board will look over 
all the wi-itten examination papers after they have been marked by the examiner; they 
will decide whether the marks awarded are fair and they will make a special report to 
the Commandant as to why a boy who has failed cannot go on. 



tHiPARTMIiXT OF MIfJTIA AM) DHFUXCE 99 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 39 

4. Tailoring Estahlisiime.nt 

The Board strongly recommends that all tailoring work of the Gentlemen Cadets 
should ho done entirely by the R.M.C. Tailorinir Staff. 

5. Buildings, Dormitory Accommodation 

The Board approves of the recommendation of the Commandant that the Fort 
Frederick Dormitory building should be completed by the addition of the two wings 
without delay, and further recommend that the Commandant in resubmitting his 
request, should mention the following facts, which have liocn embodied in his annual 
report for the year 1920-21: — 

The iireicut year, 1021, 56 Gentlemen Cadets will graduate; therefore 56 successful 
candidates writing will be admitted to the College. 

In 1922 only 39 Gentlemen Cadets will graduate; therefore only 39 successful 
candidates writing will be admitted to the College. 

The following year, 1923, only 15 Gentlemen Cadets will graduate ; therefore only 
15 of the successful candidates can be admitted. 

As soon as the fact that only fifteen candidates may be admitted to the Eoyal Mili- 
tary College in 1923 becomes generally kno-svn, there will be great dissatisfaction 
throughout the country. The Board strongly recommends that the Minister of Militia 
take action at once to have the work commenced on the additional accommodation 
required for Fort Frederick. Dormitory, so not only will accommodation be available 
in the year 1923 to take in the same number of successful candidates as this year, 
namely 56, but that the accommodation be increased so that the total accommodation 
of the College for cadets will be 300, thus permitting the admission of 75 successful 
candidates in 1923 and subsequent years. 

6. Status of Pay and Rank of Members of the Superior Staff 

The Board of Visitors again recommend that both the Military and Civil members 
of the Superior Staff be made homogeneous, both as regards ranlr and pay, and further 
recommend that the proposition of the Commandant, as submitted last year, be adopted 
(which is as follows) : — 

"For purposes of pay, the various members of the ^Superior Staff would be graded 
for pay as under: — 

" Director of Studies. — On appointment, on the basis of a Colonel, Permanent 

Force, plus $100 per annum, with annvial increase of $100 per year to a 

maximum of $500. 
'' Professor.^ — On appointment on the basis of Lieut. -Colonel, Permanent Force, 

plus $100 per annum, with annual increase of $100 to a niaxium of $500. 
■'Associate Professor. — On appointment on the basis of a Major, Permanent 

Force, plus $100 per annum, with annual increase of $100 to a maximum 

of $500 per annum. 
"Instructor. — On apiiointiiient, on the basis of a Captain, Permanent Force, with 

additional pay as laid down for an Associate Professor. 

"The manner in which it is suggested that this change be brought about is that 
for what may be known as the "Present Civil Appointments" (such as Professor of 
Mathematics, etc., etc.) to the Superior Staff of the Eoyal Military College, any 
gentleman appointed to fill a vacancy who does not already hold a commission would 
be appointed to the Canadian Militia, given temporary rank, posted to the General List, 
Canadian Militia, and from there shown as an officer of the Active Militia actively 
employed on the Staff of the Eoy.al Military College of Canada. 



100 DEPAKTMEXT Of MILITIA AND DEFENCE 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

"On appointiiient as above, the suggestion is that the rank should be that of a 
lieutenant on first appointment, and the temporary or local rank granted in accord- 
ance Tvith the appointment to be held on the College Staff. Gentlemen granted 
appointments under these provisions would be required to qualify for the rank of 
lieutenant within the usual time limit prescribed for officers appointed to the non- 
permanent Active Militia. 

"In the case of officers of the British Regular Forces, or of the non-permanent 
Militia, the rank held by an officer on appointment to the College Staff will have no 
bearing on the emoluments to be received by him, the ranks suggested above being 
the determining factor in computing the pay to be enjoyed by the incumbent and also 
as a guide in appointing those gentlemen to military rank who, as aforesaid, have 
not previously held commissions in the ai'my. It is to be understood that notwith- 
standing these provisions, an officer of the British Regular Army or Canadian Per- 
manent Forces, whose rank is below the rank laid down for the appointment which 
he is to hold, may be given temporary rank of his appointment during the jieriod 
which he holds the same." 

In the event of an officer of the Permanent Force being appointed to a position 
on the College Staff, in no case will the pay of bis appointment be below his Regi- 
mental Pay and Allowances." 

7. Servants 

The Board was again asked by the Commandant to approve his suggestion 
concerning servants at the Royal Military College, which is as follows: — 

"The Board concur in the recommendation of the Commandant with regard to 
servants, as follows : — 

" That the Royal Military College servants should be placed on a military 
basis and that in order to accomplish this, they should be enlisted in the C.M.S.C. 
Section " B," and shown as on command to the Royal Military College. The 
enlistment of these servants in the C.M.S.C. is recommended for the reason that 
it is felt that in some cases the categories of the men employed for this positioiL 
would not permit of their cnlistement in other Permanent Force units. The Board 
i-onsider it would be a distinct advantage to the college to place the servants on a 
military basis, more espcciall.y from a disciplinary view. This would be a charge 
against the R.M.C. Vote." 

s. Improvement of College Area 

The Commandant submittted a scheme for the planting of trees in tlie college 
area, which is recommended by the Board. 

9. Training 

Cavalry and Equitation. — The Board viewed with great pleasure the excellent 
equitation in the cavalry movements performed by the gentlemen cadets, and in the 
mounted sports. 

Artillery. — The Battery Gun Drill carried out by the 2nd Class was very smart 
and very well executed. 

Military Engineering. — The Military Engineering, bridging and demolitions, 
as demonstrated before the Board, were considered to be of a very high standard. 

Infantry Drill and Ceremonial. — The Board viewed with satisfaction the per- 
formance of Infantry Drill and Rifle Exercises, which were carried out in a very 
smart manner, the only comment beins' that the very difficult operation of saluting 
with tlie sword could be improved upon 



DEPARTMENT OF MllJTlA AND DEFENCE 101 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

Trench Raiding. — Tlio P)o;ird witnessed with greiit plonsin-c flic daylight raid on 
a section of trenches by (lir 'Jiiil. •'Jrd and 4th Classes. 

Command and Inxtniclinn. — Tn the diffeiM nt brandies of the service the Gentle- 
men Cadets not only took actual comiiiand of the Siiuadrons, Troojis, Companies, 
Platoons, etc., but imparted instruction in a very efficient manner. This, the Board 
understands, is a new departure, and has n<it hitherto been attempted in the curricu- 
lum (if training. 

Assaull-al-Arms in the Oymnasium. — The Physical Training in both fluur and 
apparatus work carried out liy the whole College was e.xcellent. 

10. DlSCU'I.ISE 

The Board examined the conduct sheets of the Gentlemen Cadets and found 
that the discipline of the College for the past year had been excellent. 

11. PiiYsic.vi. CoNniTiox OF Gentlemen C-vdets 

On examination of the Medical Records of the College the Board found that the 
health of the Gentlemen Cadets dviring the past year had been very good. 

The Board having had the privilege of witnessing the Gentlemen Cadets carry 
out several phases of their military and ph.vsical training, and having made numerous 
enquiries regarding the academic side of the instruction, and consulted the health 
and punishment charts and other documents connected witli the administration of the 
Royal Military College, desire to place on record their high appi-eciation of the ser- 
vices of the Commandant and Staff. 

Many useful and valuable innovations have been introduced by the Commandant, 
which will undoiibtedly tend to further increase the welfare and efficiency of all 
concerned. 

The Staff have worked with enthusiasm and devotion, with the excellent results 
already noted. 

All of wliicii is rcs|)ectfully submitted. 

A. W. CURRIE, 

Chairman, Board of VisitorSj E.M.C. 

W. G*IBSONK, 

G. L. PAKET. 

J. SUTHERLAND BROWN, 

F. L. WANKLYN, 

JOHN S. HENDRIE, 

W. B. IQNGSMILL, 

A. BOWEN PERRY, 

W. A. G-RIESBACH, 

Memhers, Board of Visitors, R.M.C. 



IHU'AUTMIi^T UF MILITIA Ai\D DEFENCE 103 

StSSIONAL PAPER No. 36 



INDEX 

Page. 
Accounts — 

Appropriation 54 

Active Militia (Non-Perniancnt) — 

Allowances 62 

AppoinlTuents 25 

Pay Services H 

Reorganization 21 

Training T 

Active Militia (Permanent) see "Permanent Force " 

Adjutant General — Report of 20 

Allowances — 

Active Militia 62 

Permanent Force 63-67 

Appropriation Accounts 54 

Armouries — Repairs to 38-39 

Arsenals (see "Dominion Arsenals") 

Artillery — Report of Staff Officer 4U 

Assistant Deputy Minister — Report ot 53 

Buildings (Armouries, etc.), Repairs to 3S-39 

Cadet Services 14 

Canadian Expeditionary Force — 

Demobilization 23-26 

Disbandment of Units 23 

Pay Services (Demobilization) 46 

Records (Honours and Awards) 30 

" (Graves and Casualties) 31 

" (Estates) 31 

Regimental Funds Board 23 

Reserve of Officers , . ; 27 

Soldiers Dependents, Refund of transportation 51 

War Service Gratuity 4 6 

Canteen and Regimental Funds 49 

Casualties (Records) 31 

Central Registry 53 

Certificates granted (Officers) IS 

" " (N.C.O.'s and men) 19 

Chief Accountant — Report of 50 

Chief of the General Staff — Report of 5 

Courts Martial — Overseas 29 

Defence Committee 5 

Demobilization Appropriation 58 

Dependents, Soldiers — Refund of Transportation 51 

Director of Pay Services — Report of 43 

Discipline 23 

District Pay Staffs .,[[ 45 

Dominion Arsenals — Quebec and Lindsay 35 

Quebec — (Report of Superintendent) Appendix " D " 71 

Lindsay — (Report of Superintendent) Appendix " E " 76 

Dress Regulations 23 

Engineer Services ,. 37 

Equipment and Ordnance Services 34 

Estates, Soldiers' 31 

Examinations 14 

Expenditure — 

Allowances, Active Militia 62 

Comparative Statement 56 

Demobilization Appropriation ■. 58 

War and Demobilization Appropriation, from 1914 60 

Permanent Force Pay and Allowances 63-67 



^04 HKfAHTMEST OF MILI'I I i iSl) /</. A>;\ (/•; 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

Page. 

Financial Statements (Appendix " A ") 54 

Financial Statements (Appendix " B ") C2 

Graves and Casualties (C.E.F.) 31 

Historical Section 10 

Horses, Supplies for 32 

Horse Transport 33 

Hospital, Manitoba Military 26-27 

Inspector-General — Report of (Appendix " C ") 68 

Intelligence, Military (sec Military Operations and Intelligence). 

Judge Advocate General— Report of 29 

Manitoba Military Hospital 26-27 

Master-General of the Ordnance — ^Report of 37 

Mechanical Transport 33 

Medical Services — Report of Directorate 27 

Military Operations and Intelligence 6 

Military Properties disposed of and acquired 39-<0 

Militia Council 5 

Militia List 26 

Musketry 11 

Operations (see Military Operations and Intelligence). 

Ordnance Services 34 

Organization and Personal Services 20 

Pay Services — Report of Director 43 

Permanent Force — 

Establishment 21 

Officers' Messes 24 

Pay and Allowances 63-67 

Pay Services 44 

Recruiting 21 

Resignations and Retirements 2G 

Strength 21 

Training 7 

Personal Services 24 

Printing, Stationery and Contingencies 53 

(Quartermaster General — Report of 32 

Records, Directorate of 30 

Recoverable Accounts 51 

Regimental and Canteen Funds 49 

Registration Office 53 

Repairs to Buildings, Rifle Ranges, etc 38-39 

Revenue, 1920-1921 55 

Royal Military College 24 

Report of Commandant (Appendix " F ") 80 

Report of Board of Visitors (Appendix " G ") 98 

Schools of Instruction 12 

Signalling 10 

Staff Tours and War Games 14 

Supplies and Transport — Report of Directorate 32 

Survey Division 41 

Telephones 33 

Training — 

Active Militia 7 

Permanent Force '^ 

Transport and Freight Claims 51 

Transportation, Soldiers' Dependents, Refund of 51 

Transport, Horse and Mechanical 33 

Veterinary Services 33 

I 

War Loan ''7 

War Service Gratuity ■"' 

Working Pay 4 7 



12 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 A. 1922 



REPORT 



DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 



FOR THE 



Fiscal Year ending March 31, 1921 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF PARLIAMENT 




OTTAWA 

F. A. ACLAND 

PRINTER TO THE KING'S MOST EXCELLENT iMAJESTY 

I9.M 

[No. 37—1922.] 



12 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 A. 1922 



To General His Excellency the Bight Honourable Lord Byng of V'lmy, Q.C.B., 
O.C'.M.G., M.V.O., Governor General and Commander in Chief of the 
Dominion of Canada. 

May it please Your Excellency: 

The undersigned haa the honour to forward to Your Excellency the accom- 
panying report of the Deputy Minister on the work of the Department of Labour 
of the Dominion of Canada for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1921, all of which 

is respectfully submitted. 

G. D. EOBEETSON, 

Minister of Labour. 



37-1! 



J 



12 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 A. 1922 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page.. 

Introductory 5 

I. Conciliation "Work 14 

II. Industrial Disputes Investigation Act, 1907 22 

m. Fair Wages 43 

rV". Work of the Director of Coal Operations 51 

V. Eecord of Strikes for the Year 62 

VI. Labour Gazette 65 

Vil. Statistics of Prices and Wages 66 

Vill. Joint Industrial Councils 71 

IX. Employment Service of Canada 73 

X. Technical Education 99 

XI. Dominion-Provincial Commission appointed to consider Uniformity of 

Labour Laws 125 

XII. International Labour Conference — League of Nations 130 



12 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 A. 1922 



REPORT 

OF THE 

DEPUTY MINISTER OF LABOUR 

FOR THE 

FISCAL YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1921 



To the Hon. Senator G. D. Robertson, LL.D., 
Minister of Labour. 

Sir, — The work of the Department of Labour is inevitably modified by the 
variations from year to year in the nature of the industrial conditions with which 
the department comes continually into intimate touch. This has been more than 
usually the case during the fiscal year 1920-21, the period having included seasons 
marking, on the one hand, the highest degree of industrial activity ever probably 
recorded in Canada, with the highest wage rates and commodity prices, and, on the 
other hand, a degree of unemployment probably without precedent in Canada, with 
declining wages and prices. Records of the department show that food prices, which 
had been steadily rising for twenty years, reached their highest level in the summer 
months of 1920. and began then slowly to decline. The wage movement, though 
less clearly indicated, showed the same tendency. While, however, prices had been 
rising, as stated, for twenty years before the high level of 1920 was reached, the 
rate of increase did not become alarming until 1915. The prices of 1915, for 
instance, averaged fifty per cent above those of 1900, having taten fifteen years 
to achieve this increase, but, beginning with 1915, prices went upward with a bound, 
and by 1920 had doubled. The year 1915 was of course the second year of the 
great war, with submarine warfare increasing in intensity, the supply of labour 
available for production (otherwise than for war necessities) rapidly diminishing, 
and vast armies consuming, on an ever-increasing scale, commodities of all kinds. 
Wages moved in the same direction, but it is to be noted, from a careful examina- 
tion of the records of the department, that while the upward movement of prices 
and wages from 1900 to 1915 had been practically on parallel lines, this ceased 
to be the case during the five years that followed, wages being unable to move 
upward with the same speed as prices and never reaching quite the same propor- 
tion to prices as had obtained in the years prior to 1915. This does not suggest 
that there may not have been in particular localities and in particular trades 
instances in which wage increases exceeded the average of the food prices increase, 
but comparisons on a Dominion-wide basis for the bulk of trades and commodities 
show the result indicated. 

Frices reached their peak in July, as stated, and began to recede. The reces- 
sion of prices continued throughout the fiscal year and would have been ,more marked 
but for a tendency in some localities for fuel and rents to increase. At the close 
of the fiscal year the price movement was still downward. How far the recession 
of prices will continue is of course a matter of uncertainty, but it is likely to con- 
tinue at least throughout the summer. Few expect that the price levels of 1914-15 
will be reached or approximated, but, where so many of the factors involved are of 

5 



6 DEPARTMENT OF LAIiOUR 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922' 

doubtf-ul or uncertain quantity, it would be unwise to venture a prediction. The 
probability of wages falling to a pre-war level is decidedly more doubtful. In some 
cases the unions concerned are strong and aggressive and the movement downward 
is contested inch by inch. In any event, since the rise in wages followed and did not 
precede the rise in prices, and, as has been pointed out, failed to keep pace with 
prices when the latter rose rapidly, so, equally, any marked fall in wages may be 
expected to occur only after a marked drop in commodity prices. The stronger 
unions have pressed urgently the point that wage conditions were by no means 
in 1913-14 at a level accepted as satisfactory, and that any readjustment made 
necessary by falling prices should leave labour with a standard of living sub- 
stantially higher than that existing before the war, and this is a sentiment which 
undoubtedly attracts sympathy in many /quarters. 

Economic Influences 

This is not a place in which to attempt a discussion of the economic laws 
and principles with which questions of prices and wages are inseparably enmeshed, 
but it is difficult not to note in passing the increasing degree to which these matters 
are in each country subject to modification by influences not local or national in 
nature and not, therefore, directly or immediately controllable by local or national 
means. Prior to the war a fairly stable basis, for instance, existed with regard 
to international exchange. The depreciation, as a result of the war, of the national 
currency in many countries disturbed and almost destroyed the basis of inter- 
national exchange, and dealt a paralysing blow at international trade. There are 
obvious difficulties in trading between countries where credit on one side has been 
so shaken as to be in some cases at the point of disappearance. The Canadian 
dollar, prior to the war, equalled five francs in France, and now equals ten; the 
German mark, formerly about equivalent to a quarter of a dollar, now fluctuates 
at a value of between one and two cents; the lire of Italy is a third only of its 
former value; and in Poland, Hungary, Austria, and countries generally of eastern 
and central Europe, the national currencies have dropped to less than a fiiftieth, 
and in some cases less than a hundredth, of their pre-war value. Canada is for- 
tunate in having an exchange which is unfavourable only as against the United 
■States, and the disadvantage for commercial purposes of having the Canadian 
dollar worth only 86 to 88 cents in the United States .is clear. It is obvious that 
the prevalence of conditions such as these over a large part of the world must 
materially affect all countries which seek to share in international trade. 

The situation with respect to unemployment furnishes a further illustration of 
the wide sweep of these economic conditions. The fall in prices was not confined to 
Canada, but spread generally in a gi'eater or less degree over aU countries sharing 
in the commerce of the world. It was, however, hardly well under way before there 
commenced an almost precipitous decline in employment. This, too, was noted in 
most countries of the world, but api)ears to have been most marked in those countries 
where the national currency had suffered the least depreciation. The United States, 
for instance, in whose favour international currency had been most pronounced by 
virtue of it having become during the war a great creditor counti-y, suffered apparently 
most acutely of all countries with respect to unemployment, and Great Britain, pre- 
sumably second among the great nations in financial power, approximated the United 
States in its degree of unemployment, which in both countries approached the 
measure of a national calamity. Statistics with respect to unemployment are unavail- 
able in many countries in Europe, but the best information to hand seems to indicate 
that countries where there has been a marked depreciation in the national currency 
have suffered least or have recovered most quickly from unemployment, while those 
where, as in the case of Sweden, Holland, Switzerland, etc., the depreciation has been 



REPORT OF TDE DEPUTY MINISTER 7 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 

of the slightest, have suffered severely. In Canada, where, as remarked, the exchange 
is unfavourable only as regards the United States, unemployment was undoubtedly 
severe, but much less so than in the United States or even Great Britain. 

The decline of employment began in October and the volume of unemployment 
steadily increased until the number of unemployed was estimated in round figures at 
200,000. These figures are a careful estimate of the department, based on informa- 
tion collected mainly by the Employment Service branch. An oflBcial estimate of the 
unemployed in the United States placed the number, when probably at the highest 
figure, at 5,750,000, and the returns for Great Britain gave a total in round figures of 
somewhat over two millions. If these totals are compared with the respective popula- 
tions of these countries, it will be seen that Canada is in greatly the more fortunate 
position. With a population one-fifth of that of Great Britain, an equal proportion 
of unemployment would have given Canada 400,000 men and women without work, 
twice the estimated number of unemployed. With a population approximately one- 
thirteenth that of the United States, an equal proportion of unemployment would have 
given Canada 480,000 men and women without work, considerably more than twice 
the number estimated. A situation which leaves those countries whose credit has 
been lea.st impaired the chief sufferers from unemployment is certainly paradoxical 
and affords hope perhaps for a speedy recovery. 

It is, however, unnecessary to dwell further on these difficult aspects of economic 
problems, which have been mentioned here, moreover, only with a view to showing 
how intimately certain elemental industrial conditions in Canada, such as employ- 
ment or unemployment, food prices, and wage rates, etc., are bound up with the indus- 
trial conditions of lands remote from Canada, and are more or less vitally affected 
by the willingness and ability of distant communities to deal with each other and 
with this country. 

UNEMPLOYMENT CONDITIONS IN CANADA 

The problem of unemployment in Canada, though less grave than in Great Britain 
or the United States, was none the less the occasion of deep anxiety. With the 
opening of winter there was no prospect of immediate improvement. Moreover, repre- 
sentations reached the Government from many municipalities that they were unable to 
deal with the situation and appealing for federal aid, particularly by way of public 
works. It should be noted that, early in the season of unemployment, the Minister of 
Labour had conferred with many of the larger employers, inviting their assistance in 
doing what was possible to spread employment over the greatest number of workers 
by shortening hours, working part time where full time was impossible, and by intro- 
ducing the rotation system where this was practicable, and the employers responded 
on the whole generously. In this way, and by the planning of public works in the 
centres where unemployment was most pressing, a policy in which some provinces 
and municipalities cordially co-operated, the evil was restricted to the dimensions 
indicated, which, however, showed a situation frequently beyond the resources of the 
local authorities, or any assistance afforded by the province. The wliole subject of 
local relief is, under the constitution of the Dominion, a matter primarily for the 
municipal authorities, and in the second place for the Provincial Government, but the 
Dominion Government, in view of representations received and having in mind that 
the unemployment situation arose from conditions on the whole neither local nor 
national, but seemed rather to be one of the perhaps inevitable sequels of the great 
war, undertook, in communications addressed by the Minister of Labour to the Pro- 
vincial Governments and the municipalities, to become responsible for the repayment to 
a municipality of one-third of any money expended for the relief of workers unable 
to obtain employment and in necessitous circumstances; the federal contribution was 
not made conditional on the payment by the different Provincial Governments of a 
second third, but the Dominion Government had, in its communication, indicated the 
hope that this course would be taken, and several provinces accepted the plan and 



8 DEPARTMESr OF LABOUR 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

assumed one-third of the rtmnicipal expenditure incurred in relieving unemployment. 
The plan was in operation by the end of the calendar year, and at the end of the fiscal 
year there had been distributed the sum of $343,036. Many of the municipal accounts 
were late in reaching the Department of Labour, and, moreover, the unemployment 
situation remaining serious, the federal plan was continued into the new fiscal year. 
The cities most affected were Toronto, Vancouver, Winnipeg, Hamilton, and Montreal, 
ranking as to relief necessities in about the order named, many smaller towns and 
cities, however, receiving grants proportioned on their disbursements. 

There were many evidences of the value of the aid thus rendered by the federal 
authorities. Many of the municipalities receiving this assistance, and expressing 
appreciation of the same, urged, however, that the advantage of the federal grant 
would have been still greater had it been made on conditions which permitted the use 
of the funds in furnishing work for the unemployed instead of in the payment of 
doles to the unemployed. The Dominion Government, in dealing with the problem, 
had not deemed it desirable to depart from the principle that the cost of municipal 
undertakings must be borne by the local community, with such assistance as the 
province may choose to give, no part of the expenditure falling normally on the 
federal treasury. It is, however, clear that many classes of municipal work can be 
carried on during the winter months only at consideriibly increased cost, and this 
fact was a severe handicap on the efforts of municipalities to provide work for the 
unemployed. The view was freely advanced that a continuance of the unemployment 
situation would justify the acceptance by the Dominion authorities of responsibility 
for paying at least a portion of any increased cost due to carrying on municipal under- 
takings during the winter months, and it is not unlikely that, should the unemploy- 
ment situation continue during the winter of 1921-22, some assistance will be rendered 
to municipalities in this way. 

The federal plan of relief during the winter of 1920-21 included the requirement 
that each person receiving relief should produce a certificate from the local branch 
of the Employment Service showing that the holder had sought work and was unable 
to secure it. The statements received from each municipality as to its disburse- 
ments were carefully checked by the accounts branch of the Department of Labour. - 

Treatment of Unemployment 

It is to be noted that the manner of dealing with the unemployment situation 
differed in the various countries facing the situation. The method selected in Canada 
has been described. In Great Britain the majority of the unemployed came within 
the scope of the Unemployment Insurance Act and received a certain amount of 
relief. With regard to the United States, there is no record of formal action on the 
part of the federal authorities, but presumably municipal and state authorities aided 
in a measure by public works. In several countries in continental Europe unemploy- 
ment insurance prevails in some form. The continental systems differ greatly from 
each other, and are, in many cases, imder frequent revision; their administration, also, 
is often partly local in character. In Great Britain, where the Act is administered on 
a national basis, there have been numerous amendments since the close of the war, 
but the law in its latest form (June, 1921) requires weekly payments from workers of 
sevenpence and sixpence for men and women, respectively, and from employers of 
eightpence and sevenpence respectively, with payment of half these sums for persons 
under eighteen. The contribution of the Government is one-fourth of the sum of that 
of employer and worker. The amount payable to the unemployed worker under the 
latest amendment is fifteen shillings weekly, or, in 'Canadian money, as at the present 
exchange rate, three dollars. The war years in Groat Britain had been a period of 
extremely active employment and the unemployment fund built up under the provi- 
sions of the Unemployment Insurance Act had remained comparatively untouched. 
Eor some months the weekly payments had been at the rate of twenty shillings, but 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 9 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 

it was more than the fund wduIcI bear, and the weekly payment was reduced to fifteen 
shilling's. 

The relative merits of the different systems of unemployment insurance and the 
extent to which any system works to the public advantage are points which are 
receiving close attention in Canada. The following sentences from the speech of His 
Excellency the Governor General at the opening of Parliament in February indi- 
cate the attitude of the Dominion Government on the subject: — 

" Unemployment, the world-wide result of the conditions to which I have 
referred, though less widespread in Canada than elsewhere, has received the 
most anxious consideration. Of the charges for the relief of general unem- 
ployment, measures have been taken to bear a substantial share, and special 
measures have been taken to assist disabled and partially disabled ex-service 
men. These will be submitted to you for approval. 

" An investigation is being conducted by the Department of Labour into 
systems of unemployment insurance and old age pensions." 

In fulfilment of the undertaking the Department of Labour has been actively 
pursuing inquiries into the matters named. Much information had been, of course, 
accumulated in the department, but recent years have brought many changes in 
legislation and in points of view, and the situation is one needing a more intensive 
inquiry than any yet attempted. At the time of writing, it is the intention of the 
Minister of Labour, should his public duties permit, to proceed overseas during the 
simimer months and, by personal observation and investigation in some of the 
countries which have legislated on these matters, endeavour to reach a conclusion as 
to the benefits derived and to what extent similar legislation would meet the 
necessities of Canada. It is possible that other oiBcers of the department will be 
called overseas during the year in connection with the participation of the Dominion 
in the work of the International Labour Office, and, should this expectation be 
realized, these officers also will devote some attention to these matters. A bulletin 
summarizing the legislation on unemployment in the different countries of the world 
was issued shortly before the close of the year. 

Question of Industrial Unrest 

A subject always of deep interest in a brief retrospect of the year economically 
and industrially, is the extent of industrial unrest as measured by strikes and lockouts 
and the standing of Canada in these matters by comparison with other countries. As 
has been explained in previous reports, the records of the department are tabulated 
on the basis of the calendar year to permit a more convenient comparison with the 
figures of other countries, which also, as a rule, are tabulated for the calendar year. 
The year 1919, it will be recalled, showed the highest level in the departmental record 
of nineteen years, both as to numbers of strikes, of employers and workmen 
respectively involved, and of working days lost, this last feature, which is perhaps 
the truest measure of industrial unrest, reaching in 1919 within a fraction of the 
four million mark, almost twice the economic loss shown in any previous year. In 
commenting upon the year 1919 in these matters, however, it is necessary to recall 
the fact that its industrial history includes the quite unprecedented general strike in 
WinnijTeg, which accounted for almost a third of the large time losses. The calendar 
year 1920 was fortunate in escaping any outbreak remotely resembling that of the 
Winnipeg strike. The industrial activities were at their highest during the first half 
of the year, with prices rising until the month of July was reached, and these condi- 
tions were not favourable to relieving the tension of industrial unrest, a condition 
always existing in greater or less degree. The time losses were, at 886,954 working 
days, less than one-quaiter of those of the calendar year 1919, and, though yet far 



10 DEPARl'MEyT OF LAJiOUR 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

larger than desirable, did not include any industrial struggle causing particular danger 
or inconvenience to the public. 

Perhaps there is no country with which, relative numbers of population being 
borne in mind, Canada can be more fittingly compared industrially than the United 
States, the processes and general conditions of industry being largely identical, and 
the workmen belonging, as a rule, to the same trades unions. The figures of the 
Dominion census for 1921 are not available, but, estimating the population at the 
level of 8,500,000, and that of the United States at 110,000,000, the republic contains 
about thirteen times the population of the Dominion. In the number of strikes 
recorded, the United States barely equals this proportion, the figures being 285 for 
Canada as compared with 3,167 for the United States, but the economic loss to the 
United States from strikes, measured in working days, was more than fifty times that 
of Canada, the figures heing 48,163,754 for the United States and 886,754 for Canada. 

It will be of interest to turn for a moment also to Australia. Reference has been 
frequently made in the pages of the report of the work of this department from year 
to year to the conditions of the sister Commonwealth with respect to industrial 
disputes and legislation on the subject. Even before the creation of the Common- 
wealth in 1900, several of the Australian colonies, as they were then known, had, 
together with ISTew Zealand, achieved a certain distinction in the world by the enact- 
ment of legislation of a move or less drastic character, aimed at the diminution or 
abolition of strikes and lockouts as a feature of industrialism, and, in fact, going 
far in the direction of declaring all strikes and lockouts unlawful. The Common- 
wealth continued for many years much the same attitude to industrial disputes but 
concerned itself principally with disputes extending beyond the bounds of 
a tingle state. Federal and state laws on the subject followed each other with 
startling rapidity, until something like a maze of legislation was created. Unfor- 
tunately the numerous statutes failed to bring nearer the object sought, and com- 
parison between the Commonwealth of Australia and the Dominion of Canada 
continues now, as on previous occasions, to be greatly to the advantage of the 
Dominion. Canada has heen greatly less active than Australia in the realm of 
legiislation as to industrial disputes. The outstanding federal statute has been for 
many years the Industrial Disputes Investigation Act, 1907, three times amended, 
simply to be strengthened in its underlying principles, or as to a detail of adminis- 
trative machinery, and the provinces have been equally sparing in statutes, confining 
their legislation to efforts in the way of conciliation, save perhaps for the Quebec 
statute of 1921, to be mentioned later. The more closely the situation is regarded 
from this point of view the greater appears the ground for the conclusion that legis- 
lation in Canada on these matters has been on lines which have proved to be on the 
whole sounder and more practicable than those followed in Australia, and have 
accordingly brought a substantially larger benefit to the community. The population 
of Australia is barely two-thirds that of the Dominion. The two countries are in 
about equal degree agricultural or pastoral, but differ greatly with respect to climate, 
and Australia contains but a small proportion of population of other than British 
origin. Having these points in mind it is interesting and important to note that, 
whereas the strike record of Canada for 1920 showed 285 disputes in existence during 
the year, with 1,272 employers and 52,150 workpeople involved, and time losses in 
working days of 886,754, the situation in Australia, with its smaller population, was 
substantially worse at all points, and, by measurement of working days, involved an 
economic loss slightly more than twice that of Canada, the figures for Australia 
being 554 strikes, 2,104 employers, 102,519 workers, and time losses of 1,872,065 
working days; the figures for Australia are those of the Commonwealth Statistician. 
From the Commonwealth Statistician also have been received very complete figures 
as to industrial disputes for the period 1913-1920, and a comparison of the returns 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 11 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 

of the two countries shows that about the same proportione are found in the average 
over the period of eight jears. For Canada the record for eight years shows 1,202 
strikes, with time losses of 8,759,312 working days; for Australia the figures are 
3,167 strikes, 17,336,860 time losses in working days. It vjae noted above that the 
1919 strike level in Canada, in loss of working days, was at a shade under four 
millions, greatly the highest on record, the figures being swollen by the Winnipeg 
strike. The year was a bad one everywhere in industrial disputes, but it is a sur- 
prising fact that Australia exceeded, by over two million working days, this highest 
Canadian level, the Commonwealth record showing losses for 1919 of 6,308,226 work 
days. 

Great Britain is a third country with which comparison is interesting, and the 
result is the same. Taking the number of strikes and time losses for the year 1920, 
we find for Great Britain 1,715 strikes and 27,011,000 lost work days, as against 285 
strikes and 886,754 lost work days in the case of Canada, the figure for Great Britain 
being in excess of the proportions of the respective populations. If we apply the 
same test as in the case of Australia, and take the figures for the eight-year 
period, 1913-1920, we secure the same conclusion. In Canada, as quoted above, 
strikes during the period 1913-1920 numbered 1,202, and the lost work days 8,759,312; 
the figures for Great Britain for the period show 8,851 strikes and 101,075,003 lost 
work days, again greatly out of proportion to the relative populations; the figures of 
lost work days for the same period in the United States are not all available, but incom- 
plete records show them to have been in the neighbourhood of three hundred mil- 
lions. For continental Europe, the particulars are to hand for the year 1920 only 
in a few cases, and, where available, tell the same story. Italy reports 1,881 strikes 
and 16,398,000 lost work days ; Sweden, a country with a smaller population than 
Canada, reports 486 strikes and 8,943,000 lost work days, or ten times the time losses 
of Canada; the Netherlands, also with a population somewhat under that of Canada, 
shows 457 strikes and 1,005,000 lost work days. 

A feeling of satisfaction at the fortunate situation of Canada in these matters 
whenever a comparison is possible is natural and inevitable, and it would be unreason- 
able if the department did not feel that its efforts have been a considerable factor 
in giving Canada this pre-eminence, whether as exerted through the Industrial 
Disputes Investigation Act, 1907, by way of the highly efficient work of the depart- 
mental corps of officials engaged chiefly in conciliation work, or by other agencies 
of the department. 

Features of the situation which should not be, however, overlooked are the extent 
to which industrial and economic conditions have been, during recent years of war 
and reconstruction, the subject of special regulation or legislation with a view to 
meeting situations of an abnormal character. The creation of the position of 
Director of Coal Operations to deal with conditions in District Eighteen and the 
institution during the war of a Board of Appeal from Boards of Conciliation estab- 
lished under the Industrial Disputes Investigation Act are illustrations of such 
legislation in Canada. There is good ground, too, for the view that much benefit 
resulted from such measures, as also from the searching and effective inquiry into 
industrial conditions made by a Eoyal Commission in aVIay and Jtme, 1919, and 
from the National Industrial Conference held at Ottawa in September of the same 
year. 

The Industrial Disputes Investigation Act, 1907 

The Industrial Disputes Investigation Act, 1907, has been during the year 
reasonably active, there having been established 37 conciliation boards out of 69 
disijutes dealt with under the Act. The Act, it will be remembered, was enacted on 
March 22, 1907. The total number of disputes dealt with since that date is 509. 
The tribunal known as the Canadian Railway Board of Adjustment No. 1, estab- 



12 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

lished during the suiiuirt to deal with disputes between Canadian railways and six 
trade unions, representing railway workers, continued to operate during the year. 
Under the agreement disputes affecting railway ■workers, members of the unions 
concerned, (1) Locomotive Engineers, (2) Locomotive Firemen, (3) Conductors, 
(4) Trainmen, (5) Railroad Telegraphers, (6) Maintenance of Way Men. were 
referred to the board and duly settled, save that in one case a dispute was referred 
under the terms of the Industrial Disputes Investigation Act. There were six 
disputes where the inquiry before a Board of Conciliation and Investigation failed 
to prevent a strike, a larger proportion than usual, but the strikes resulting were 
not the occasion of serious public inconvenience, that involving the St. John, N.B., 
street railway workers being the most important. 

Reference has been made on several occasions in the pages of these reports to 
the difficulty arising from the inapplicability of the Industrial Disputes Investigation 
Act, 1907, to disputes arising as between municipalities and municipal employees, 
whether clerical workers, police, firemen, waterworks employees, municipal street 
railway workers or others. The situation is one involving constitutional points and 
need not be again here discussed, otherwise than to refer to the legislation enacted 
at the 1921 session of the Quebec Legislature, the Municipal Strike and Lockout Act, 
providing for the compulsory arbitration of disputes in municipal services and 
applicable to practically all classes of workers. Legislation by the province seemed 
to be the only effective way of providing means of dealing with the class of disputes 
in question, and this was the course suggested in discussing the subject in these pages. 
The Manitoba Industrial Conditions Act, 1919, is not indeed aimed expressly at 
municipal disputes, but disputes of all classes, save those relating to agricultural and 
railway workers, are brought within its scope and may be dealt with by the Joint 
Board created under its provisions. The Manitoba statute does not go beyond the 
stage of conciliation, its provisions being compulsory at no point; it is none the less 
an agency of excellent type and likely, under the able eluiirmanship of Rev. Dr. 
Gordon (Ralph Connor), to exercise an increasing influence for industrial peace. 

Other Branches op Work 

Full statements appear in the report with regard to the other statutes and ordin- 
ances administered under the authority of the minister, namely, the Conciliation and 
Labour Act, the Fair Wages Resolution, the Employment Offices Co-ordination Act, 
and the Technical Education Act; also as to other aspects of the work of the depart- 
ment, that of the fair wages and conciliation officers, that of the Statistical 
Branch, the publication from month to month of the Labour Gazette, 
the issue of bulletins on various aspects of the joint council movement, 
the publication of the annual reports on Labour Organization in Canada and 
Labour Legislation in Canada, the duties incidental to the membership of the 
Dominion Government (through the Minister of Labour) in the Governing Body of 
the International Labour Conference as constituted under the Versailles Treaty of 
Peace, etc. Disbursements during the year to the provinces or to municipalities under 
the provisions of the Employment Offices Co-ordination Act totalled $233,908.75, and 
sums paid to the provinces under the provisions of the Technical Education Act 
amounted to $580,675.43. 

It will be remembered that the ISTational Industrial Conference held in September, 
1919, recommended the appointment of a board to consider the question of the pro- 
motion of the uniformity of labour laws in Canada, the board to include representa- 
tives of Federal and Provincial Governments and of employers and workmen. Such a 
Royal Commission was appointed and met at Ottawa during the month of April, 1920, 
under the chairmanship of the Deputy Minister of Labour for Canada. The commis- 
sion dealt in considerable detail with the subject in question, and presented a report 
which is summarized in the present volume. 



REPORT Of TEE DEPUTY MINISTER 13 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 

The second meeting of the International Labour Conference was held during 
the year at Genoa, Italy, extending from June 15 to July 10. The agenda related 
specifically to liours and conditions of labour among seamen. The Dominion delega- 
tion was composed as follows: Government delegates, the Honourable Philippe Roy, 
Commissioner General at Paris, France, and Mr. G. J. Desbarats, C.M.G., Deputy 
Minister of Naval Affairs, Ottawa; Employers' delegate, Mr. Thomas Robb, Mont- 
real, Secretary of the Shipping Federation of Canada; Workmen's delegate, Mr. J. C. 
Gauthier, Montreal, President of the Sailors, Firemen and Cooks' Union of Canada. 
The most important matter coming before the conference was a convention looking 
to the limitation of the hours of labour for seamen, as to which, however, the neces- 
sary two-thirds majority was not obtained and no action was taken. 

The Governing Body of the International Labour Organization met three times 
during the fiscal year, namely, in June, October, and January. The June meeting 
was held at Genoa shortly before the meeting at that city of the Second International 
Labour Conference as above. Canada continues to be represented on this Body by 
the Honourable G. D. Robertson, Minister of Labour, but the minister, being unable, 
on account of pressure of public duties, to attend, was represented by a substitute at 
each of these meetings, and it was found possible to utilize for this purpose the ser- 
vices of Dominion oiScials whose duties require them to reside in Europe, or who 
were in Europe at about the time of the Governing Body meetings, on official busi- 
ness for other branches of the Government. Honourable Philippe Roy, of Paris, 
attended the June meeting; Mr. R. H. Coats, Dominion Statistician, the October 
meeting, and Mi*. L. C. Christie, of the Department of External Affairs, the January 
meeting. A further meeting held in April, 1921, shortly after the close of the fiscal 
year, was attended by Mr. W. L. Grifiith, of London, Secretary to the High Commis- 
sioner for Canada. Each and all of these gentlemen served effectively as stibstitutes 
for the minister. 

A piece of departmental work arising directly out of the war and which, at one 
time, assumed considerable proportions, that, namely, of acting as agent of the British 
Government in the distribution of separation allowances to dependants of overseas 
munitions workers, came practically to a close during the fiscal year. The Canadian 
workmen who had proceeded overseas to do munitions work in Great Britain had all 
returned to Canada within a year or two after the war, but a considerable number of 
cases arose where the workmen or, in some cases where the workmen were deceased, 
their dependants advanced claims due to alleged oversight on the part of the British 
officials or to special circumstances which suggested a certain responsibility on the 
part of the British Government. The Deputy Minister of Labour had, during a brief 
visit to Great Britain on official business in 1920, discussed these matters with the 
British officials, and as a result a sum of money was set aside for the adjustment 
of claims of the nature indicated, the Department of Labour being requested to under- 
take the work of adjustment. The details of settlement were entrusted mainly to 
Mr. H. Hereford, an officer of the department, who visited the points affected, so far 
as this could be conveniently done, and a satisfactory adjustment was effected. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

F. A. ACLAND, 

Deputy Minister of Labour and Registrar of Boards of 
Conciliation and Investigation. 
Department of Labour, Ottawa. 



14 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 



I. CONCILIATION WORK 

Apart from the conciliation work performed by various officers of the depart- 
ment, of which mention is made in the chapter dealing with the operations of the 
Industrial Disputes Investigation Act, 1907, the assistance of the Department of 
Labour was invoked during the year in connection with many individual labour 
disputes. In some cases the minister himself played an active part in achieving 
settlement and the services of the fair wages officers of the Department were exten- 
sively utilized in conciliation work. The officers in question are: Messrs. E. N. 
Compton and W. D. Killins, who are stationed at Toronto and Ottawa respectively; 
Mr. F. E. Harrison, who is stationed at Calgary, and who keeps in touch with condi- 
tions in the Prairie Provinces, acting also as assistant to the Director of Coal Oper- 
ations ; Mr. D. T. Bulger, who is stationed at Vancouver, and whose territory embraces 
the province of British Columbia, and Mr. T. Bertrand, whose headquarters are in 
Montreal, and who works chiefly in the province of Quebec. 

In addition to the assistance rendered by the fair wages officers in the settlement 
of labour disputes, efficient services were rendered on many occasions, and particularly 
in Quebec and the Maritime Provinces, by Mr. E. McG. Quirk, of Montreal. Mr. 
Quirk, though not actually an officer of the department, has frequently been appointed 
as a special representative. 

The correspondents of the Lahour Gazette and the superintendents of the employ- 
ment offices at several points have also acted sometimes as conciliators. 

Reference is also made in another chapter of this report to the conciliation work 
of the department in connection with the mining operations in the Alberta and 
British Columbia coal fields. 

Labour Unrest in Nova Scotia and New Bkunswick Coal Fields 

The labour unrest in the Nova Scotia and New Brunswick coal fields was receiv- 
ing the attention of the department at the close of the fiscal year 1920, and Boards of 
Conciliation and Investigation had been appointed under the Industrial Disputes 
Investigation Act, 1907. In some cases the boards had been successful in obtaining 
signed agreements between the operators and their employees ; in other cases no 
agreements were reached. In June, 1920, one of the boards established in this 
connection, and which had been reconvened to adjust certain wage scales, recommended 
that "a Eoyal Commission be appointed with full powers to deal with the whole mining 
industry of Nova Scotia with a view to making such recommendations and findings 
as in its judgment will tend to stabilize the industry and to best conserve the interests 
of the mine workers, the operators and the public." This recommendation was made 
in view of the fact that no public interest would be apparently served by an investi- 
gation restricted to one company, and that several boards either meeting simultane- 
ously or successively would find it almost impossible to arrive at a common agreement. 

In July, 1920, following the aforesaid recommendation, a Eoyal Commission 
was established composed as follows: Mr. E. McG. Quirk, Montreal; 'Sir William 
Stavert, Montreal, and Mr. W. P. Hutchinson, Moncton, N.B. ; 'Mr. Quirk being 
chairman. 

The board was empowered, apart from questions affecting the coal mining 
industry of Nova Scotia, to deal also with certain difficulties existing in connection 
with questions pertaining to coal mining operations in the Miuto district in the 
province of New Brunswick. 



REPORT OF THE DEPVTT MINISTER 15 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 

The report of the commission was received in September, 1920, and contained 
detailed recommendations concerning a basis of a settlement of the dispute. These 
findings were not wholly acceptable to the disputing parties and the unrest continued. 
In October, 1920, a conference of representatives of the operators and their employees 
was summoned in Montreal by the Department of Labour. The conference continued 
from October 20 to 21 and from November 3 to 8. Those present at the conference 
were as follows: R. M. Wolvin, President, E. P. Merrill, General Manager, and H. 
J. McCann, Assistant General Manager, of the Dominion Coal Company, Limited; 
D. H. McDougall, President, and A. S. McNeill, Superintendent of Mines, of the 
Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Company, Limited; Robert Baxter, President, and J. B. 
McLachlan, Secretary-Treasurer, of District No. 26, United Mine Workers of America, 
and John P. White, Cleveland, Ohio, former President of the United Mine Workers 
of America, who attended on behalf of the International headquarters. The Depart- 
ment of Labour was represented by Gerald H. Brown, Assistant Deputy Minister, 
and Mr. Quirk, chairman of the Royal Commission, also attended on invitation. 
The findings of the Royal Commission were used as a basis of discussion during the 
conference. An agreement was finally reached and ratified by a referendum vote of 
the members of the United Mine Workers of America in District 26, the terms being 
communicated by the district oflicers to the employees of all the coal mining companies 
in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. Eventually agreements were signed between the 
various companies and their employees which terminated this dispute. 

In the chapter dealing with proceedings under the Industrial Disputes Investi- 
gation Act mention is made of applications which were received from the electrical 
workers, machinists, and various other classes, also from the employees in the yard 
service of the Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Company and the Dominion Coal Company, 
for Boards of Conciliation and Investigation to deal with their demands concerning 
wages, etc., and of the efforts of the department towards bringing about conciliation. 
At the close of the fiscal year adjustments had not been effected of these disputes. 

Cost of Lhixg Comjiission, Vancouver Isl.\nd, B.C. 

Reference was made in previous annual reports to the appointment in the fall of 
1918 of a Royal Commission composed of Mr. D. T. Bulger, resident fair wages 
officer of the Department of Labour in Vancouver, chairman, Mr. Tully Boyce, of 
Nanaimo, on behalf of the coal operators of Vancouver Island, and Mr. J. McAllister, 
of Cumberland, on behalf of the coal miners of Vancouver Island, to deal with wages 
matters connected with the coal mining industry on Vancouver Island. The arrange- 
ment made in connection with this matter and details of procedure are included in 
another chapter of this report. 

Other Mediation Work 

The following is a list of the more important cases in connection with which 
mediation work was performed during the year by personal intervention on the part 
of the Minister of Labour, or by officers or agents of the department, and by corre- 
spondence : — 

MIXING 
October, 1920: 

Thetford Mines, Que.- — A strike of certain of the employees of the Asbestos Corporation of 
Canada. Limited, re wases, received the attention of two officers of the department in 
the locality and a settlement was effected. 

January. 1921 : 

Minto, K.B. — Advice was received in the department of an alleged lockout of certain of the 
workmen employed in the mines operated by the International Paper Company. 
Inquiry showed no ground for the charge of lockout and conferences resulted in the 
men returning to work, when the mines were reopened, but on the company's terms. 



16 DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION 

April, 1920; 

Chielph, Ont. — The assistance of the department was requested in connection with a settle- 
ment of a dispute involving the painters, paperhangers and decorators employed on 
the Speedwell Military Hospital and by six other firms, concerning the employees' 
demand for increased wages and shorter hours. An ofBcer of the department visited 
the locality and succeeded in bringing about a settlement, the demands of the employees 
being granted. 

Moncton, N.B. — ^Two officers of the department gave attention to a strike of the painters 
and decorators. Conferences were arranged and a settlement effected as a result, 
increased wages being granted. 

Hamilton, Ont. — The Minister of Labour was requested to name a chairman of a local 
board of arbitration appointed to deal with a threatened dispute concerning wages 
involving certain of the building trades. The arbitrator named was successful in 
effecting a settlement. This dispute also received the attention of an ofBcer of the^ 
department who visited the locality. 

London, Ont. — ^Through the intervention of an officer of the department, who visited the 
locality, a strike of the hod-carriers was averted. 

May, 1920 : 

Moncton, N.B. — Through the intervention of an ofiicer of the department, who visited 
Moncton, agreements were effected which resulted in the settlement of a strike of 
various classes in the building trades, increased wages being granted. 

Stratford, Ont. — The assistance of the department was requested in connection with a strike 
of plumbers. This matter received the attention of an officer of the department. A 
settlement was finally effected on the employers' terms. 

Toronto, Ont. — A strike occurred of the glass bevellers and scratch polishers employed by 
six firms. Through the interi-ention of an officer of the department in the locality 
conferences were arranged which resulted in a compromise being readhed. 

July, 1920: 

Ottawa, Ont. — A strike occurred of the electricians in the employ of H. L. Allen concerning 
alleged violation of agreement. The department was requested to name a chairman 
of tlie industrial council which was to deal with the dispute. The findings of the 
chairman named were to the effect that no violation of agreement had occurred, and 
the men returned to work pursuant to the council's rulings. 

September, 1920: 

Saskatoon, Sask. — A strike occurred of the carpenters employed by various firms. Through 
the mediation of an officer of the department a compromise was effected, increased 
wages being granted. 

October, 1920: 

Vontreal, Que. — A strike of the plumbers employed by various firms received the attention 
of an officer of the department in the locality, who endeavoured to bring about a settle- 
ment. At the close of the fiscal year an adjustment had not been reached. 

Port Arthur, Ont.- — A strike of the carpenters and hoist engineers employed by the Pulp 
Mill Construction Comiwny concerning wages and hours was adjusted through conJer- 
ences arranged by the officer of the department in Port Arthur. The employees 
concerned were granted increased wages and the eight hour day. 

Toronto, Ont. — A dispute between various firms and certain of their employees, being lead 
glaziers, received the attention of an officer of the department. As a result of confer- 
ences arranged a satisfactory adjustment was effected. 

January, 1921: 

Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. — The assistance of the department was requested m connection with 
the settlement of a dispute between various contractors and certain of their employees, 
being steam and operating engineers. Correspondence regarding the matter resulted 
in negotiations between the disputants being renewed, and a strike was averted. 
Toronto. Ont. — A dispute concerning an alleged violation of agreement on the part of some 
contractors with respect to certain employees of the building trades received tlie 
attention of an officer of the department in the locality, and a satisfactory adjustment 
was effected. 

MBTTAX-S, MACHINERY AND CONVEYANCES 
April, 1920 : 

St. Hyacinthe, Que. — A dispute between the Omega Machine Company and its machinists 
received attention by the department through correspondence and also by a repre- 
sentative of the department in the locality. Although an adjustment could not be 
effected satisfactory to both parties concerned, no strike occurred. 

Hamilton, Ont. — A strike occurred of the steam and operating engineers in the employ 
of the Steel Company of Canada concerning wages. This strike threatened to extend 
to various other firms, and the Minister of Labour visited Hamilton and succeeded in 
effecting a settlement of the dispute. 



REPORT OF TBE DEPUTY MINISTER 17 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 

May, 1920: 

Port Arthur, Out. — A dispute arose involving all classes in tlie shipbuilding trades employed 
by the Port Arthur Shipbuilding Company concerning the men's demand for increased 
wages. The department grave attention to this dispute by correspondence and sent a 
special officer to Port Arthur. It was, however, impossible to avert the threatened 
strike, the company refusing the men's demands. Conferences were held with the 
various parties concerned, also with the city officials. Finally through tlie further 
intervention of an officer of the department at Port Arthur a conference was arranged 
which resulted in the men agreeing to resume worli on the company's terms, an,d 
the strike ended. 

June, 1D20 : 

Halifax, N.S. — The assistance of the department was requested in connection with the 
strike of certain employees of the H.alifax .Shipyards, Limited. A representative of the 
department was sent to Halifax, but before his arrival the strilte had terminated, the 
majority of the strikers having returned to work on the company's terras. This matter 
also received the attention of the department through correspondence. 

Bull, Que. — A reauest was received for the intervention of the department in connection 
with a dispute between the Iron and Steel Foundry Company and certain of its 
employees concerning an alleged unjust dismissal. The investigation of the matter 
by an officer of the department showed that the company appeared to be justified in 
the action it had taken. 

Toronto, Ont. — A strike occurred of the machinists in the employ of the Bawden Machine 
Company. An officer of the department interviewed the disputants and it was found 
Uiat the strike had been called through a misunderstanding. The men returned to 
work on the employers' terms. 

July, 1920: 

Toronto, Ont. — A strike occurred of tlie ornamental iron woricers in the employ of the 
Canadian Allis-Chaljiiers Company concerning wages. This dispute received the atten- 
tion of two officers of the department in the locality. Eventually a compromise was 
effected. 

Montreal, Que. — Tlie assistance ot the department was requested in connection with the 
settlement of a strike of the iron workers in the employ of the Steel Company of 
Cariada concerning certain demands affecting the Union. Efforts were made by the 
Minister througli correspondence and by representatives of the department in the 
locality to bring about conferences between the disputants, but these were without the 
desired success. A settlement was finally reached and the strike ended. 

Toronto, Ont. — The good offices of the department were requested in connection watli a strike 
of the macliinists in the firm of the Steel Radiation Company of Toronto concerning 
certain union demandi?. A rS'presentative of the department held conferences with all 
parties involved but was unsuccessful in bringing about a settlement satisfactory to all 
concerned. The men finally resumed work on the employers' terms. 

August, 1920 : 

Montreal, Que. — A dispute concerning the cause of the closinig down of the plant of the 
Canadian Car and Foundry Company received the special attention ot the department, 
interviews being held with the management of the company, the city officials and the 
employees. Through the mediation of the department negotiations between the disput- 
ants were renewed and the strilce ended. 

October, 1920 : 

Vancouver, B.C. — Ad\'ice was received in the department of a threatened strike in the 
shipbuilding industry, regarding a reduction which had been made in wages. An 
application was received for a Board of Conciliation and Investigation from tlie 
employees of the Wallace .Shipyards, tout, as this industry did not fall within the scope 
of the Industrial Disputes Investigation Act, no Board could be established. A repre- 
sentative of the department in the locality kept in touch with this situation, holding 
conferences with all parties concerned. The threatened strike was averted. 

December, 1920 : 

Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. — The department was requested to assist in the adjustment of a 
dii'spute between the Algoma Steel Corporation and its electrical workers concernjng a 
reduction in wages and certain alleged union discrimination. An officer of the depart- 
ment was sent to Sault Ste. Marie and it was found that some of the men had ceased 
"work. Renewed negotiations were brought about and as a result the majority of the 
men were reinstated, although certain of tiheir demands concerning union conditions 
were not granted. 

February, 1921 : 

Toronto, Ont. — In response to a request for the assistance of the department in tlie adjust- 
ment of a dispute between the Canadian Allis-Chalmers and the Sunbeam Lamps and 
certain of their respective employees, being hoilermakens and patternmakers, concerning 
a reduction in wages without due notice, an officer of the department an the locality 
intervened and succeeded in averting a strike. The companies met the men's demands 
and gave the required thirty days' notice, but made the reduction of wages effective 
after that period had expired. Certain features of the dispute also received the 
attention of the Minister through corresiiondence. 

37 — 2 



18 DEPA.RTiIEST OF LABOUR 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

March 1921: 

St. John, N.B. — ^Advice was received of an alleged lockout of certain of the eraployeee of 
the Maritime Nail Co. This dispute received the attention of the Minister through 
correspondence, and an officer of the department was also sent to St. John. Investi- 
gation showed that the company appeared to tie justified in closing down the plant 
and also in opening it under changed conditions. 

WOODWORKING 
June, 1920: 

Owen Sound, Ont. — A strike occurred of certain of the employees of the North America 
Furniture Co«npany concerning wages. Through the mediation of an officer of the 
department, who was sent to Owen Sound, an adjustment was effected, increased wages 
being granted. 

January, 1921 : 

Toronto, Ont. — Through the mediartion of an officer of the department, a strike of the 
rubbers and poli^ers employed by the Heintzman Piano Company was adjusted. The 
men returned to work at a reduction in wages. 

February, 1921 : 

Toronto, Ont. — An officer of the department in Toronto was requested to assist in the adjust- 
ment of a dispute between the Brunswick Phonograph Company and certain of their 
employees, being finishers, rubbers and polishers. Although conferences were held with 
the disputants, an adjustment satisfactory to both parties could not be arranged. No 
strike occurred. 

PULP AND PAPER 
April. 1920 : 

Bromptonville, Que. — Through the mediation of an officer of the department, an adjustment 
was effected of a strike of certain of the workers in tihe Bromptonville Pulp Mill 
concerning a protest against increased work. The employees' demands were not 
conceded. 

Three Rivers, Que. — Through the mediation of an officer of the department, who visited 
Three Rivers, an adjustment was effected of an alleged lockout of certain maintenance 
men in the employ of the Wayagamack Pulp and Paper Company. A further dispute 
occurred in August, when it was alleged by certain of the employees that the company 
was not conforming to its terms of agreement. This was also settled through the 
mediation of an officer of the department. 

January, 1921: 

Thorold, Ont. — A strike of the employees of the Beaver Board Company received the special 
attention of the department through an officer who was sent to the locality, and also 
by correspondence. At the close of the fiscal year the strike remained unterminated. 

February, 1921 : 

Chatham, N.B. — Advice was received in the department of an alleged lockout of certain of 
the employees of tlie Fraser Companies Mills. The dispute received attention through 
correspondence, which indicated that the firm was justified in closing its mills, further 
that it was willing to re-open them, but at reduced rates of wages. An officer of the 
department visited the locality and interviewed the parties involved. Renewed 
negotiations resulted in a settlement. 

CLOTHING 
October, 1920: 

Stratford, Ont. — Through the mediation of an officer of tlie department, who was requested 
to lend his assistance, a settlement was effected of a strike, concerning wages, of the 
textile workers in the employ of the Avon Hosiery Company, a compromise being 
reached. 

January, 1921 : 

Montreal, Que. — Strikes of the operators, pressers and finishers in tlie employ of Cohens, 
Limited, and Schelliskys, concerning the employees' refusal to work on a piecework 
basis, received the attention of an officer of the department in the locality. Negotia- 
tions resulted in certain replacements and settlements were eftectedi 

February, 1921 : 

Hamilton, Ont. — The assistance of tlie department was requested in connection witli the 
strike of the clothing workers in the emiploy of various firms concerning a reduction 
in wages. Conferences were arranged by a representative of the department, who 
visited the locality, and finally an adjustment was effected. 

TEXTILES 
July, 1920: 

Carleton Place, Ont. — Advice was received in the department of a dispute in the mills of 
Bates and Ennis Company concerning the refusal of various of the employees to meet 
with certain requirements of the company. An officer of the department visited the 
locality but was unable to secure an adjustment of the dispute on a basis satisfactory 
to both parties concerned. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 19 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 

January, 1921 : 

Guelph, Ont. — It was alleged that the Dominion Linens, Limited, were not conforming with 
the terms of agreement resarding wages and hours, and on this account certain of 
their employees, being doffers, spinners, etc., had ceased work. An officer of the 
department visited Guelph and interviewed the disputants in an endeavour to bring 
nbout a settlement. Through renewed negotiations an adjustment was effected, the 
employees resuming work on the company's terms. 

St. John, MilUown and Marysville, N.B.- — Advice was received in the department of a 
protest of the employees of the Canadian Cottons, Limited, against a reduction in 
wages. The minister took this matter up with the management of the company by 
correspondence and when in New Brunswick gave it further attention. At the close 
of the fiscal year no strike had occurred, but a settlement satisfactory to both parties 
to the dispute had not been arranged. 

FOODS, LIQUORS AND TOBACCO 
April, 1920: 

Montreal, Que. — Through the mediation of a representative of the department in the locality 
a new working agreement was effected between the meat cutters and various employing 
firms. 

May. 1920: 

Peterborough, Ont. — Through the mediation of an officer of the department and by corres- 
pondence, an adjustment was effected of a strike of the meat cutters in the employ 
of the Canadian Packing Company. 

Hamilton, Ont. — An officer of the department aided in bringing about negotiations which 
resulted in a settlement of a strike of the bakers employed by various firms. 

Toronto, Ont. — A dispute in the firm of the Cowan Chocolate Company received the atten- 
tion of an officer of the department in the locality, conferences being held with both 
parties. The matter was adjusted by direct negotiations between the disputants. 

Toronto, Ont. — A settlement of a strike of the dairy drivers employed by the Toronto City 
Dairy Company, was effected through the efforts of an officer of the department in 
Toronto. 

Montreal, Que. — A strike occurred of the sugar refinery workers in the St. Lawrence and 
Canada Refineries concerning a demand of the employees for increased wages and 
shorter hours. A representative of the department inter\'iewed both parties concerned 
in an endeavour to bring about a settlement, and the matter was also the subject of 
correspondence between the Minister and the respective disputants. A' new working 
agreement was finally brought about as a result of negotiations, but largely on the 
employers' terms. 

June. 1920: 

Calgary, Alta. — Advice was received in the department that a number of the employees of 
P. Burns and Com-paniy had been laid off. presiumably on account of union affiliation. 
An officer of the department in the locality aided in the negotiations which resulted in 
the reinstatement of certain of the employees, but the terms of settlement were not 
satisfactory to the employees, and a further strike occurred in November. The strikers 
later returned to work on the employers' terms. 

July, 1920: 

Montreal, Que. — An officer of the department aided in the settlement of a strike of the egg 
candlers employed in various firms concerning the demand of the employees for 
increased wages and a reduction of hours. The settlement was in favour of Uie 
employers. 

November, 1920 : 

Montreal, Que. — Upon request, a representative of the department interviewed the parties 
concerned in a dispute toet-ween the Davies Company and its meat cutters concerning 
certain alleged union discrimination. Investigation showed that the company appeared 
to be justified in the action they had taken. No strike occurred. 

February, 1921 : 

Montreal, Que. — ^A retpresemtative of the department, upon request, lent assistance in an 
effort to avoid a threatened strike of the meat cutters in the employ of the Montreal 
Abattoirs. The efforts were unsuccessful and a strike occurred involving several other 
firms. At the close of the fiscal year this dispute was still receiving the special atten- 
tion of the department through its officer in Montreal and also through correspondence. 

March, 1921 : 

London. Ont. — The department was requested to send a representative to London to assist 
in bringing about a settlement of the dispute which had been in existence for some 
(months between the cigarmakers and various firma An officer visited London and 
held conferences with both parties involved. Shortly after the close of the fiscal year 
a settlement was effected. 

Bull, Que. — A dispute occurred between the Canadian Packing Company and its meat 
cutters concerning an extension of the working hours. A conference was held in the 
Department of Labour between representatives of the disputants, and further attention 
was given the matter by a special officer of the department. A threatened strike was 
averted. 

37— 2 i 



20 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

LEATHER 
May, 1920: 

Ottawa, Ont. — ThrouKh the mediation of two officers of the department, an agreement 
providing for increased wages was effected between several firms and their leather 
workers. 

November, 1920 : 

Montreal, Que. — A strilte of the shoe w^orkers in the ejnploy of Daoust. Lalonde & Company 
concerning a reduction in wages received the attention of the department's officer in 
Montreal. Information was later received that a strike no longer existed. 

TRAXSPORTATION (STE.\M RAILWAY SERVICE) 
May, 1920: 

Saitlt Ste. Marie, Ont. — In response to a request for the assistance of the department in 
the settlement of a dispute concerning wages between the Algoma Central Railway 
and its carmen, a representative was sent to Sault Ste. Marie. Through his mediation 
an agreement was effected. 

June, 1920 : 

Inverness, N.S. — A dispute between the Inverness Railway and Coal Company, Limited, and 
its raflway eimployees concerning a demand for increased wages received the special 
attention of the department through correspondence, and by a representative who 
visited the locality. Conferences were held with both parties and recommendations 
made which Anally formed the (basis of a settlement, a strike being averted. 

October, 1920 : 

Sudbury, Ont. — A dispute occurred between the Algoma Central Railroad and certain of its 
employees concerning the company's refusal to make certain rates of wages retro- 
active. A representative of the department was sent to Sudbury and succeeded in 
satisfactorily adjusting the dispute. 

December, 1920 : 

Regina, Sask.—A dispute regarding certain alleged unjust dismissals on the Grand Trunk 
Pacific Railway received the special attention of the Minister through correspondence, 
and an adjustment was effected. 

December, 1920, — February, 1921 : 

St. Thomas, Ont. — Advice was received of alleged lockouts of the shop employees of the 
Michigan Central Railroad and the Fere Marquette Railroad. An officer of the depart- 
m«nt "visited St. Thomas in December and February, and from his investigation of the 
matter it appeared that no violation of agreement had occurred. This view the 
emiployees' representatives accepted. 'While in St. Thomas, this officer lent assistance 
In the adjustment of several minor disputes in the locality. 

February, 1921 : 

Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. — A dispute between the Algoma Central and Hudson Bay Railway 
and certain of its employees conceminig a reduction of wages and the closing of the 
shops without due notice received the special attention of the Minister through corre- 
spondence. 'While it appeared the company was justified in the action taken, an under- 
standing was given that the employees concerned would receive back pay at the old 
rates and that due notice would be given of the reductions to be made. 
TRAXSPORTATION (ELECTRIC RAILWAY SERVICE) 

May, 1920 : 

London, Ont. — Through the mediation of an officer of the department, an adjustment was 

effected of a strike of certain of the employees of the London Street RaMiway concern.- 
ing a demand for increased wages. 

MISCELLANEOUS TRANSPORT 

March, 1920: 

Quebec, Que. — A protest was made to the Minister concerning alleged unjust dismissal of 
certain employees of the Quebec Cartage and Transfer Company. The matter received 
special attention by the Minister through correspondence, and an officer of the depart- 
ment was sent to the locality. His investigation, after conferences with all parties 
concerned, showed that the men did not appear to be justified in their demands. 

April, 1920 : 

Montreal, Que. — Representatives of the department gave special attention at various times 

to the dispute be'tween the Dominion Transport Company and certain of its employees, 

and a settlement was finally effected. 
Halifax. N.S.— Through conferences arranged by a representative of the department, who 

visited Halifax, a strike, concerning wages, of the coal handlers employed by various 

firms, was adjusted, a compromise being reached. 

May 19'*0 • 

Edmonton Ai(n.— Advice was received of a dispute between the Edmonton Cartage 
\ssociatioii and its teamsters concerning the employees' demand for increased wages 
and union recognition, and the assistance of the department was requested m an 
effort to bring about a settlement. The Minister gave special attention to the dispute 
tlirough correspondence, and an officer of the department was sent to the locality. 
Through renewed negotiations an adjustment was effected, a new working agreement 
being adopted. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 21 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 

October, 1920: 

Montreal, Que. — A dispute concerning allcgred discrimination on tlie part of a certain 
agent in the employ of the Canadian National Express, which threatened to result In a 
strike, was investigated by officers of the department. It dirt not appear, however, 
from their investigation, that the employees were justified in their charge. No strike 
occurred. 

March, 1921 : 

Vancouver, B.C. — A dispute between the Cartage Association of Vancouver and its team- 
sters concerning the employees' demand for a new working agreement received the 
special attention of an offlcer of the department resident in Vancouver. At the close of 
the fiscal year the new agreement had not been effected, although it did not appear 
that a strike would occur. 

NAVIGATION 
May, 1920: 

Vancouver and Victoria, B.C. — Through the mediation of an officer of the department in the 
locality, a settlement was effected of a strike, concerning wages, of ce.rtain of the 
employees of the Canadian Pacific .Steamship Company and the Grand Trunk Pacific 
Coast Steamship Service, a compromise being reached. 

June, 1920 : 

North Sydney, N.S. — A strike of the longshoremen in the employ of the Reid Newfoundland 
Company was adjusted through the mediation of an officer of the department who was 
in the locality. 

July, 1920: 

Vancouver and Victoria, B.C. — An officer of the department was appointed arbitrator in 
the dispute between the Coastwise Steamship and Barge Company and its engineers. 
Increased rates were awarded and a strike averted. 

MUNICIPAL, EMPLOYMENT 
April, 1920 : 

St. Catharines, Ont. — Upon request a dispute between the City of St. Catharines and its 
firemen received the special attention of the department through correspondence and 
by long distance telephone conferences. The matter was later adjusted by direct 
negotiations between the parties concerned. 
September — October, 1920: 

North Vancouver, B.C. — An offlcer of the department was appointed arbitrator in a dispute 
between the Corporation of North Vancouver and members of the Canadian Merchant 
Service Guild. Threatened strikes were averted. 
January — March, 1921 : 

Port Arthur, Ont., Regina, Sask., Moose Jaw, Sask., Calgary, Alta. — Threatened strikes of 
the school teachers received special attention of the department through corres- 
pondence and by officers of the department in the localities. Settlements were effected 
through direct negotiations between the disputants. 

MISCELLANEOUS 
January, 1921: — 

Ottawa, Ont. — A dispute between the Baker Laundry Company and certain of its employees 
regarding wages and union discrimination received the attention of the Minister and 
other officers of the department. An adjustment was effected. 



22 DEI'AHTMEyT OF LABOUR 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 



n. INDTJSTEIAL DISPUTES INVESTIGATION ACT, 1907 

FOURTEENTH AXXFAL REPORT OF PROCEEDESTGS, BEIXG FOR THE 
FISCAL YEAR EOTDING MARCH 31, 1921 

Introductory Note 

In the following pages will be found the tables usually presented with this report 
The disputes dealt with during the year numbered 69, six of these, however, being 
disputes which were carried over from the preceding year. Boards were granted 
in 37 cases, the remaining being dealt with by other agencies than those of Boards 
of Conciliation and Investigation. The statute, it will be recalled, was enacted in 
March, 1907, and the total number of disputes dealt with since that date number 509. 

The tribunal known as the Canadian Railway Board of Adjustment No. 1, which 
was established during the Siummer of 1918, to deal during the war with disputes 
between Canadian railways and six trade unions representing railway workers, 
continued to operate during the year 1920-21. Under agreement disputes affecting 
the workers who had membership in the unions involved were referred to the Canadian 
Railway Board of Adjustment No. 1 and duly settled. For special reasons one 
exception was made in this respect and the dispute in question was adjusted by a 
Board of Conciliation and Investigation appointed under the Industrial Disputes 
Investigation Act. 

SiMMARY Tables Respecting PROCEEDnccs Under the Industrul Disputes 

In^'estigation Act, 1907 

The tables here presented are arranged in several divisions, viz. : (i) showing 
proceedings by industries concerned, from April 1, 1920, to March 31, 1921; (ii) 
showing proceedings by industries concerned from March 22, 1907, to March 31, 1921 ; 
(iii) showing by fiscal years, 1907-21, number of disputes dealt with; (iv) showing 
by calendar years 1907-21, number of disputes dealt with, and (v) containing statistical 
summary of operations under the statute for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1921. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 

I. TABLE SHOWING PROCEEDINGS BY INDUSTRIES FROM APRIL I, 1920, TO MARCH 31, 1921 



23 



Industries affected 



Number of 

applications 

for Boards 

received 



Number of 

Boards 
established 



Number of 

strikes not 

averted 

or ended 



I. Disputes affecting mines, transportation and communication and 
other public utilities; 
(1) Mines: 

(a) Coal 

(b) Metal 



Total mines. 



(2) Transportation and communication; 

(a) Railways 

(b) Street Railways 

(c) Express 

(d) Shipping 

(e) Telegraphs 

(t) Telephones 



13 

13 

2 

1 

1 
1 



10 
2 

1 





Total transportation and communication. 



31 



21 



(3) Miscellaneous; 
Light and power. 



Total mines, transportation and communication and 
public utilities 



45 



29 



II. Disputes not falling clearly within the direct scope of the Act: 
(1) Public utilities under provincial or municipal control: 

(a) Street railways 

(b) Other civic employees 



Total public utilities under provincial or muni- 
cipal control 



(2) Miscellaneous. 



18 



Total disputes not falling clearly within the direct 
scope of the Act 



24 



Total all classes. 



69 



37 



The proceedings under the Act during the year include six cases in which certain 
Ijroceedings had taken place during the preceding year, namely, disputes between 

(1) the Canadian National Railways and certain of their employees at Halifax, N.S.; 

(2) the Grand Trunk Railway and its clerks, etc.; (3) the Corporation of Ottawa 
and its civic employees; (4) the Canadian Fish and Cold Storage Company, Prince 
Rupert, B.C., and its fish packers; (5) the Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Company, 
Limited, Sydney Mines, and certain of its employees, and (6) the Inverness Coal and 
Railway Company, Inverness, N.S., and certain of its employees. 

At the close of March, 1921, results were still pending in connection with five 
applications concerning disputes between (1) the Niagara, St. Catharines and 
'J'oronto Railway and certain of its employees; (2) the Corporation of Ottawa and 
its firemen; (3) the Canadian National Railways and certain of their employees in 
•the Stores Department, Fort Rouge, Winnipeg, Man.; (4) the Dominion Steel 
Company, Limited, Sydney, N.S., and its electrical workers, machinists, etc., and (5) 
the Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Company, Limited, New Glasgow, and its tin workers, 
electrical workers, machinists, etc. 



24 



DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 



12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 
11. TABLE SHOWING PROCEEDINGS BY INDUSTRIES FROM MARCH 22. 1907. TO MARCH 31, 1921 



Industries affected 



Number ot 

applications 

for Boards 

received 



Xuraber of 

strikes not 

averted 

or ended 



I. Disputes afTeeting mines, transportation and communication, other public 

utilities and war work; 

(1) Mines; 

(a) Coal 

(b) Metal 

(c) Asbestos 

Total mines 

(2) Transportation and communication: 

(a) Railways 

(b) Street railways 

(c) Express 

(d ) Shipping 

(e) Telegraphs 

(f) Telephones 

Total transportation and communication 

(3) Miscellaneous; 

(a) Light and power 

(b) Elevators 

Total miscellaneous 

(4) War work 

Total mines, transportation and communication, other public utilities 
and war work 

II. Disputes not falling clearly within the direct scope of the Act: 

(1) Public utilities under provincial or municipal control 

(2) Miscellaneous 

Total disputes not falling clearly within the direct scope of the Act 

Total all classes 



62 
19 

1 


7 
S 



82 


12 


146 
84 
11 
21 
12 
7 


7 
6 
1 


1 



281 


15 


16 

1 


3 



17 


3 


30 


1 


410 


31 


45 
54 


1 
1 


99 


2 



509 



33 



The figures contained in the above table may be thought to show discrepancies 
as compared with those appearing in the yearly summary. A closer examination 
will, however, show the statements of both classes to be in agreement. A complete 
statement of proceedings for a year must show all disputes dealt with during the fiscal 
year. The figures of the yearly statement include, therefore, disputes carried over 
from the previous year and which are counted in the summary of that year's proceed- 
ings. Thus the same dispute may properly figure in the annual statement for each 
of the two years. In the statistical recapitulation covering several years, as above, it 
is necessary that no disputes shall be counted more than once, and account is taken 
of the number of applications received during the year and thus brought within the 
purview of the statute. 



REPORT OF THIi DEPUTY MINISTER 



25 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 

III. TABLE SHOWING BY FISCAL YEARS, 1907-1921, NUMBER OF DISPUTES DEALT WITH 





1007- 


1908- 


1909- 


1910- 


1911- 


1912- 


1913- 


1914- 


1915- 


1916- 


1917- 


1918- 


1919- 


1920- 


Total 




1908 


1909 


1910 


1911 


1912 


1913 


1914 


1915 


1916 


1917 


1918 


1919 


1920 


9121 


Number of applica- 


































34 


21 


27 


24 


IS 


21 


10 


10 


14 


36 


52 


95 


72 


63 


509 


Numbcr of boards 




granted 


31 


19 


25 


19 


l.l 


17 


15 


17 


11 


20 


38 


60 


46 


37 


370 


Number of disputes 
































where strike not 
































averted (or ended) 


1 


1 


4 


4 


4 


4 





I 


' 


1 


1 


2 


3 


6 


33 



(The remark at the foot of Table II applies equally to apparent discrepancies aa between the above summary by fiso a 
years and yearly summaries of proceedings.) 

IV. TABLE SHOWING BY CALENDAR "iTilARS, 1907-1921. NUMBER OF DISPUTES DEALT WITH 



•1907 
9mos. 


1908 


1909 


1910 


1911 


1912 


1913 


1914 


1915 


1910 


1917 


1918 


1910 


1920 


tl921 
3mos. 


25 


27 


22 


28 


21 


16 


18 


18 


15 


29 


53 


93 


70 


61 


13 


22 


25 


21 


23 


16 


16 


15 


18 


12 


16 


37 


59 


47 


41 


2 


1 


1 


4 


4 


4 


3 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


3 


5 


1 



Total 



Number of applications 

Number of boards granted 

Number of disputes where strike not 
averted (or ended) 



509 
370 



33 



•The Act became law on March 22, 1907, so that the proceedings cover nine months only. 
fTo the end of the financial year, March 31 

(The remark at the foot of Table II applies equally to apparent discrepancies as between the above summary by 
calendar years and yearly summaries of proceedings.) 



26 



DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 



12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 



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12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 



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34 



DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 



12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 



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36 



DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 



12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 



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38 



DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 



12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 



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The report was signed by the chair- 
man and Mr. Dowlerand contained 
recommendations concerning in- 
creased wages as a settlement of 
the dispute. The findings were 
accepted by the corporation but 
rejected by the men. Mr. Pattison 
presented a minority report. No 
strike occurred. 

Proceedings unfinished at the close 
of the fiscal year. 

After the application had been re- 
ceived negotiations between the 
parties concerned were renewed 
and the dispute settled without 
Board procedure. 


Date of 

receipt of 

report 

of 
Board 


cot-T 


Date on 
which 
Board 
was con- 
stituted' 


Aug. 21, 
1920 


Names of Members 

of Board: 

(c) Chairman; 

(e) Employer; 

(m) Employees 


N. M. Patterson, (c) 3; 
W.A.Dowler,K.C., 
(r.) 1;J. R. Pattison, 

(M)l. 


1 

3 


Wage.'5 

Wages and conditions. . . 
Wages 




36 

177 dir. 

5 indir. 


>> 


Fort William, Ont.. 

Ottawa. Ont 

Windsor, Ont 


c4 


Employees . 

Employees . . . 
Employees . . 


s 

s 
a. 

s 


Corporation of the City 
of Fort William and 
certain of its em- 
ployees, being fire 
fighters, members of 
Local Union No. 193, 
International Associa- 
tion of Fire Fighters. 

Corporation of the City 
of Ottawa and certain 
of its employees, being 
firemen, members of 
the International As- 
sociation of Fire Fight- 
ers. 

Corporation of the City 
of Windsor and certain 
of its employees, being 
firemen, members oi 
Local Union No. 159, 
International Associar 
tion of Fire Fighters. 


Date of 
r eceipt of 
applica- 
tion 


Aug. 16. 
1920 

Mar. 24, 
1921 

Mar. 31. 
1921 



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39 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 






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is Honour J 
Patterson* 
Prof. How Li 
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Walters, (m 


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DEPARTMESr OF LABOUR 



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SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 



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DEPA-RTilENT OF LABOUR 



12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 



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KEl'ORT OF THE DKriTY MlMsTfCh' 43 

■SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 

in. FAIR WAGES 

The Fair Wages Branch of the department has to do with the administration of 
the fair wages policy of the Dominion Government, which is based on a resolution of 
the House of Commons adopted in the session of 1900, as follows: — 

" That it be resolved, that all Government contracts should contain such 
conditions as will prevent abuses, which may arise from the subletting of such 
contracts, and that evei-y effort should be made to secure the payment of such 
wages as are generally accepted as current in each trade for competent workmen 
in the district where the work is carried out, and that this House cordially 
concurs in such policy, and deems it the duty of the Government to take imme- 
diate steps to give effect thereto. 

" It is hereby declared that the work to which the foregoing policy shall 
apply includes not only work undertaken by the Government itself, but also all 
works aided by grant of Dominion public funds." 

Additional force was given to the fair wages resolution in the revision of the 
Hallway Act in 1903, by the insertion in that statute of a section requiring the payment 
of current rates of wages to all workmen engaged in the construction of any line of 
railway towards which the Parliament of Canada has voted financial aid by way of 
subsidy or guarantee. 

An Order in Council was adopted on August 30, 1907, '' to more effectively further 
the purpose of the fair wages resolution of the House of Commons of Canada, of 
March, 1900," by the insertion of the following clauses in all Government contracts 
;to which the said resolution applies : — • 

" 1. Contractors shall post in a conspicuous place on the public works under 
construction, the schedule of wages inserted in their contracts for the protection 
of the workmen employed. 

" 2. Contractors shall keep a record of payments made to workmen in 
their employ, the books or documents containing such record shall be open for 
inspection by the fair wages officers of'the Government at any time it may be 
expedient to the Minister of Labour to have the same inspected." 

In connection with proposed works of construction a fair wages schedule setting 
forth the minimum wage rates and the hours of labour to be observed is prepared in 
advance and embodied in the contract. The practice is to prepare these schedules as 
they are required. For this purpose one of the fair wages officers of the department 
usually visits the locality in which the work is to be performed and ascertains, by 
inquiry from both employers and workmen, the scale of remuneration and the hours 
of labour generally prevailing in the district for the various classes of labour required. 

In other cases a general clause is inserted in the contract, the terms of which 
are as follows : — 

All mechanics, labourers or other persons who perform labour in the con- 
struction of the work hereby contracted for, shall be paid such wages as are 
generally accepted as current from time to time during the continuance of the 
contract for competent workmen in the district in which the work is being 
performed, and if there is no current rate in such district, then a fair and 
reasonable rate, and shall not be required to work for longer hours than those 
fixed by the custom of the trade in the district where the work is carried on, 
except for the protection of life or property, or in the case of other emergencies. 
In the event of a dispute arising as to what is the current or a fair and reason- 



44 DEI'AUTMEST Or LABOUR 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

able rate of wages or what are tlie current hours fixed by the custom of the trade, 
it shall be determined by the Minister of Labour, whose decision shall be final. 

These conditions shall extend and apply to moneys payable for the use or 
hire of horses or teams, and the persons entitled to payment for the use or hire 
of horses or teams shall have the like right in respect of moneys owing to them 
as if such moneys were payable to them in respect of wages. 

In the event of default being made in payment of any money owing in 
respect of wages of any mechanic, labourer or other person employed on the 
said work, and if a claim therefor is filed in the office of the Minister of 

and proof thereof satisfactory to the minister is furnished, the 

minister may pay such claim out of any moneys at any time payable by His 
Majesty under such contract and the amounts so paid shall be deemed payments 
to the company. 

The company shall post in a conspicuous place on the works under construc- 
tion the general clause above mentioned for the protection of the workmen 
employed. 

The company shall keep a record of payments made to workmen in its 
employ, and the books or documents containing such record shall be open for 
inspection by the fair wages officers of the Government at any time it may be 
expedient to the Minister of Labour to have the same inspected. 

Fair wage conditions arc also inserted in contracts for the manufacture of certain 
classes of Government supplies, and in contracts for all railway construction to which 
the Dominion Government has granted financial aid, either by way of subsidy or 
guarantee. 

During the year various complaints were received in connection with inadequate 
wages and other matters pertaining to these railway contracts and the manufacture of 
Government supplies. These complaints were referred to the department of the 
Government directly involved. In many cases investigations were made by the 
Department of Labour, and, where complaints appeared to be well founded, recom- 
mendations concerning adustment were made when referring the matter to the depart- 
ment concerned. 

The Department of Labour is also frequently consulted by other departments of 
the Government regarding the wage rates to be observed in connection with work 
undertaken on the day labour plan. 

The number of fair wages schedules prepared by the Department of Labour during 
the year 1920-21 for insertion in Government contracts was 49. These were divided 
among the different departments of the Government as follows: Public Works, 20; 
Railways and Canals, 12; Militia and Defence, 3; Marine and Fisheries, 6; Interior, 
5; Naval Service, 2; and Indian Affairs, 1. 

Tables Eelatixg to Fair Waoes Schedules 

The following tables relate to fair wages schedules prepared by oflBcers of the 
department during the fiscal year 1920-21, and show the different departments 
controlling the contracts concerned and the locality and value of the contract: — 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MIXI.rilJIt 



45 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 






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DEPARTilENT OF LABOUR 



12 GEORGE V, A. 1922- 






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48 



DEPARTMEyr OF LABOUR 



12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 



Schedules by Provinces.- 



-Table showing, by Provinces, the Fair Wages Schedules 
Prepared, 1920-21. 



Department of Government 




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Post Office Contracts- — List of supplies furnished the Post Office Department by 
contract, or otherwise, under conditions for the protection of the labour employed, 
which were approved by the Department of Labour, 1920-21. 



Name of Order 



Amount 

of 
Order 



Making metal dating stamps and type and making other band stamps and brass crown seals 

Making rubber stamps, daters, etc 

Supplying stamping material, pads and ink 

Making and repairing post office scales 

Supplying mail bagging and making up new mail bags 

Supplying mail bag Fttings .^ ;■-■■■. 

Making and supplying art ides of official uniforms, also supplying cloth for official uniforms 

Supplying letter carriers' satchels ._. _ 

Supplying letter boxes and keys, glasses for letter boxes, string cutters, mail clerks' tin boxes, also repairing 

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Supplying motor trucks 

Making and repairing miscellaneous articles of postal stores 



Total. . 



20,447 37 

3.207 61 

6,600 02 

20,981 95 

153,714 68 

59,861 75 

270,776 81 

9,642 83 

4,327 40 

41,237 87 

8S 47 



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REPOUT OF THE DEPVTY MINISTER 



49 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 



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12 GEORGE V, A. 193? 



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REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MIXISTEH 5t 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 

IV. WORK OF THE DIRECTOR OF COAL OPERATIONS 

Mr. W. H. Armstrong, Director of Coal Operations in District Eighteen, United 
Mine Workers of America, comprising the coal mining area of the Province of 
Al'berta and the eastern part of British Columbia, submits the following report to 
the Minister: — 

Honourable G. D. Robertson, 

Minister of Labour, 

Ottawa, Ont. 

Dear Sir,^ — I have the honour to submit herewith my third annual report on the 
work of the office of the Director of Coal Operations for the fiscal year ending March 
31, 1&21. 

The year as a whole showed less industrial disputes or cessations of work in the 
coal mining industry of District Eighteen than the previous one. There were at 
different points in the area thirty-eight strikes which occasioned an estimated loss 
of 57,582 working days, compared with fifty-eight strikes and a loss of 502,405 working 
days for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1920. Of the thirty-eight strikes mentioned, 
no less than thirty-one were caused through the agitation of the One Big Union. 
Continued efforts were made 'by that organization to persuade the miners in District 
Eighteen to violate their agreement with the coal operators, but witli little success 
other than small pit-head strikes. The One Big Union, through their solicitors, 
attacked in the courts the legality of the Orders in Council empowering the Director 
of Coal Operations to administer the affairs of District Eighteen. These Orders in 
Council were, however, finally confirmed by Act of Parliament and the litigation was 
dropped. 

In the period covered by this report, there were forty-three disputes referred to 
the Director of Coal Operations for adjudication. Of these, eleven were decided in 
favour of the employer, eight in favour of the employees, seven were compromised, 
twelve withdrawn, and decisions have not yet been rendered upon the remainder. 

The mines worked practically full time during the calendar year 1920, and the 
output from the district for that period was the highest in its history. Owing to the 
almost unprecedentedly mild winter of 1921, the demand for fuel for the first three 
months of that year was much less than that of former years. As a consequence 
several of the collieries worked only part time. The total production of the mines in 
District Eighteen for the calendar year 1920 was 7,852,858 tons, being 2,190,128 tons 
in excess of the year 1919. In another part of this report will be found a compara- 
tive statement giving in detail the output. 

Negotiatioxs for Xew Agreement 

During the month of April, 1920, a new contract was completed between the 
employers and employees of the coal mines in the Central Competitive Field of the 
United States. Following the adoption of that agreement, the miners of District 
Eighteen, through their representatives, requested a conference with the Western 
Canada Coal Operators' Association to discuss the question of a new contract. A 
joint meeting was, therefore, arranged to take place on the 26th of May at Calgary, 
Alberta, and at which were present representatives of the coal operators and the 
employees. At that conference the latter submitted the following basic demands for 
a renewal of the agreement: — 

37— 4J 



52 DEPARTME}>T OF LAIiOUIi 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

1. We demand a two years' agreement from April 1, 1&20, with provision^ 
for high <?ost of living investigation as outlined in Section " D " of order No. 1 
of the Director of Coal Operations. 

2. We demand an increase of 27 (per cent on all day wage rates in and 
around the mines, same to be applied on the 1917 rates of wages, plus 92 cents 
high cost of living rates. 

3. We demand that 50 cents per day be added to all adjusted rates for out- 
side labour working on the three-shift system. 

4. That all rates governing boys' wages be eliminated and be substituted 
by the rates governing " unclassified labour ". 

5. We demand that 27 per cent be added to all contract tonnage rates, dead 
work, yardage, and room turning rates; this to be made applicable after first 
adjusting 92 cents to the contract tonnage. 

6. We demand that all adjusted rates be retroactive to December 1, 1919, 
and that an investigation be made into the cost of living to commence 
December 1, 1919, up to June 1, 1920, and that the wages be adjusted in line 
with the provisions of clause "D" of order No. 1 of the Director of Coal 
Operations, and every four months thereafter. 

7. We demand that eight hours constitute a day's work in and around 
the mines, and we demand a forty-six hour week, with six hours on Saturday 
with full payment. 

8. That the inequalities now existing, also conditions requiring to be 
adjusted, be considered in joint conference of the operators and miners, with 
a view to bringing about an amicable settlement. 

9. We demand that all coal be paid for on a run of mine basis at the 
rate of 2,000 pounds per ton. 

Following the discussion of the foregoing demands, a joint committee was 
appointed to consider the question. The operators were represented by Messrs. O. E. 
S. Whiteside, Chairman, W. F. McNeill, Secretary, Lewis Stockett, John Shanks, 
Jesse Gouge, Geo. Kellock, B. Caulfield. L. A. Drummond and R. S. Ord. The 
miners' representatives consisted of Messrs. Frank Wheatley, Chairman, E. McLeod, 
Secretary, E. Peacock, N. McDonald, G. Billsborough, and Eobt. Livett, Mr. John 
P. White, special representative of President John L. Lewis of the United Mine 
Workers of America, was also in attendance and rendered valuable assistance in 
solving the many intricate questions brought before the conference. 

In reply to the before-mentioned demands of the miners, the operators submitted 
the following proposal : — 

1. We agree to make contract dated June 1, 1920, to expire March 31, 
1922, with provisions for H.C.L. investigation starting four months after 
date of this agreement as outlined in section "P" of order No. 1 of the 
Director of Coal Operations, providing the scale of wages and contract rates 
in force throughout the district on October 31, 1919. shall be made the mini- 
mum below which no reduction shall be made during the life of this agree- 
ment. 

2. We agree to an increase in all day wage rates for men in and around 
the mines of one dollar ($1) per day, and an increase of fifty-three cents 
(53 cents) per day to rates for boys, both increases to appl.v to the rates 
contained in the 1917 agreement, leaving the H.C.L. bonus of 92 cents 
remaining as at present. 

3. We cannot agree. 

4. We cannot agree. 



hki'out of ihe dki'ity mimkteii 53 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 

5. Wu agree to an increase to the contract tonnage rates and to mining 
rates where coal is paid for entirely on the yardage basis of 27 per cent 
to be made applicable to the 1917 agreement without reference to the 92 cents 
H.O.L. bonus, provided that the maximum increase to be added under this 
clause shall not exceed 24 cents per ton in any mine, and we further agree 
that, in mines where coal is paid for on the tonnage basis, there shall be 
an increase for dead work, yardage and room turning rates of 20 per cent 
to be applied in the same manner, leaving the H'.C.L. bonus of 92 cents to 
be applied as per order No. 50 of the Director of Coal Operations. 

6. That we cannot agree to the application of the new rates now being 
negotiated made retroactive in their application. We agree to the appoint- 
ment of an H. C. L. Commission as outlined in our reply to clause No. 1, but 
the award of this Commission shall not be retroactive. 

7. As all rates for the district are now based on eight hours, we agree 
that they shall continue to be so, but cannot agree to a forty-six hour week. 

8. Unless especially provided in the contracts, all matters mentioned 
as inequalities are covered by the contract rates, and we cannot agree to make 
changes which will increase the cost of production over and above that contained 
in clause 5 of our reply. 

9. That all coal be paid for as at present. 

10. With respect to added classifications, we ask for further information. 
Having considered the operators' proposal, the miners submitted the following. 

counter proposition: — 

(a) We agree that a new contract be entered into to expire March 31, 
1922. 

(b) We agree that this contract be retroactive to May 20, 1920, and the 
retroactive pay be paid in full on or before August 1,,1920. 

(c) This contract is made and entered into for the sole use of the mem- 
bers of the United Mine Workers of America and the members of the Western 
Canada Coal Operators' Association. All men who work in and around 
the mines who are eligible to become members of the United Mine Workers 
of America shall join that organization and agree to sign check-oii for all 
dues, assessments and fines, and the management of the mines agree to for- 
ward deductions made to the acting secretary of the district or such other 
persons as that official may designate. 

(d) That all day wage rates in effect on October 31, 1919, shall be advanced 
27 per cent. 

(e) 1. Except in the lignite fields, all contract tonnage rates and con- 
tract yardage mining rates in effect on October .31, 1919, be advanced 27 per 
cent. 

2. That the tonnage rates in the lignite fields be advanced 24 cents. 

3. All dead work, yardage, room turning rates in effect October 
31, 1919, be advanced 20 per cent. 

(/) That the application of the H.C.L. 92 cents on contract miner's 
wages be made by adding the 27 per cent on the 92 cents, or $1.17 to his wages 
for each day's work. 

(g) That all other matters contained in the demands and counter-pro- 
position of the miners and operators be further considered. 

(h) That all other matters contained in the 1917-1919 agreement, unless 
changed by order of the Director of Coal Operations, shall be placed in this 
agreement unless mutually agreed by both parties to change. 



54 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

(i) That there shall be no H.C.L. Commission during the term of this 
agreement. 

After a prolonged discussion a subcommittee was appointed to submit a joint 
report to the conference. This oommittee submitted the following memorandum: — 

We, your subcommittee, beg to report and recommend the following as the 
basis for a joint agreement between the miners and operators of Alberta and 
Eastern British Columbia: — 

(1) A contract be made effective from April 1, 1930, to March 31, 1922. 

(2) That the retroaotive moneys from April 1 shall be paid on or before 
August 1, 1920. 

(3) This contract is made and entered into for the sole use of the mem- 
bers of the United Mine Workers of America and the members of the Western 
Canada Coal Operators' Association. All men who work in and around the 
mines who are eligible to become members of the United Mine Workers of 
America shall join that organization and agree to sign check-off for all dues, 
assessments and fines, and the management of the mines agree to forward 
deductions made to the acting secretary of the district or such other persons 
as that official may designate. 

(4) a. That all day wage rates in effect on October 31, 1919, (which shall 
include the 92 cents war bonus) shall be advanced 27 per cent. 

b. Except in lignite fields, all contract tonnage rates and contract yard- 
age mining rates in effect October 31, 1919, be a^lvanced 27 per cent. 

c. That the tonnage rates in the lignite fields be advanced 24 cents. 

d. That all yardage, room turning .and dead work rates in effect October 31, 
1919, be advanced 20 per cent. 

e. That the application of the H.C.L. 92 cents on contract miner's 
wages be made by adding the 27 per cent on the 92 cents, or $1.17 to his wages 
for each day's work. 

/. The 1917-1919 agreement be used as a base, and no change other than 
above indicated to be made unless the same has been made by order of the 
Director of Coal Operations or by mutual consent by the two interested parties, 
except the selling price of explosives supplies and coal. 

Signed on behalf of the Western Signed on behalf of the United Mine 
Canada Coal Operators' Association. Workers of America, District No. IS. 

E. S. Ord, Acting Chairman, Frank Wheatley, 

John SH.-Mres, Wm. Hutchinson. 

Bernard Caulfield, .Tohn P. White, 

Geo. Kellock, E. Livett, 

George V. Tupper, Robt. Billsborqugh, 

L. E. Drummond, Robt. Pe.^cock, 

Lewis Stockett, Xorman McDonald, 

W. F. McNeill, Commissioner. Eody McLeod, Secretary. 

The joint conference having adopted the foregoing memorandum, a referendum was 
submitted, to the miners of District 18, on June 22, which resulted as follows: — 

For the agreement 2,738 

Against the agreement 971 

Majority in favour of the agreernent 1,767 



REI'ORT OF THE UEi'LTY MlSlHTEli _ 55 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 

Following the ratification of the basic agreement by the miners of District 
Eighteen, a joint conferenoe was held at Calgary to arrange the details of the con- 
tract. There were present F. W. McNeill, Lewis Stockett, and George Tupper, 
representing the operators, and F. Wheatley, Rod McLeod, and Norman McDonald, 
representing tlie employees. The joint committee continued in session until the MOth 
of July, when the contract was completed. 

Activities of One Big Union Men 

Following the signing of the agreement between the United Mine Workers of 
America and the Western Canada Coal Operators' Association, the One Big Union 
became quite active. Persistent attempts were made to persuade the employees of dif- 
ferent mines to repudiate the contract and cease work. A special convention of Dis- 
trict Number One, Mining Department of the One Big Union, was held at Calgary on 
September 10th and 11th. Resolutions were passed recommending the miners to 
disavow the agreement. As a result of these efforts pit-head strikes occurred at 
several of the mines throughout the district. 

A mass meeting of miners of the Drumheller area was held on September 21 and 
the following resolution was passed: — 

"Whereas general dissatisfaction exists among the miners of this dis- 
trict owing to the enforcement of the United Mine Workers of America check- 
off and the existence of an agreement which does not represent the miners, 

" Therefore be it resolved that we demand the removal of the United Mine 
Workers of America check-off and the opening up of negotiations for a new 
agreement not later than October 1, 1920. Failing compliance with these 
demands the miners of this district will take such action as may be deemed 
necessary to enforce these demands." 

The foregoing resolution was endorsed by mass meetings of miners held at Wayne, 
Rosedale and Nacmine, all of which are in the same area. The men at the different 
collieries finally resumed work, notwithstanding the efforts of the O.B.U. to prolong 
the strike. 

W.\GE Rates Again in Question 

On the 23rd September, the United Mine Workers of America sent the follow- 
ing communication to the Commissioner of the Western Canada Coal Operators' 
Association: — 

United Mine Workers of America, 
P.O. Box 1844, 

Calgary, Alta., September 23, 1920. 
Mr. W. F. McNeill, Commissioner, 

The Western Canada Coal Operators' Association, 
1015 Herald Building, City. 

Dear Sir, — The present Joint Agreement between the Western Canada 
Coal Operators' Association and District Eighteen, U.M.W. of A., was based 
on the settlement made in what is known as the Central Competitive Field 
of the United States, which took effect April 1 this year. Since this settle- 
ment was made, the day and monthly men in the Central Competitive Field 
have received an advance in wages. We feel that the day men, boys, and 
monthly men in District Eighteen, U.M.W. of A., are entitled to the same 
increase in wages that was granted by the operators in the Central Compe- 
titive Field. 



56 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

12 GEORGE V, A. i922 

We, the undersigned, representatives of District Eighteen, U.M.W. of A., 
therefore request a Joint Conference between the representatives of the Western 
Canada Coal Operators' Association and the representatives of the United 
Mine Workers of America, District Eighteen, at as early a date as possible, 
to consider this request for an increase in wages for day men, boys, and 
monthly men covered by the present joint agreement. 

Awaiting your early reply, we .are, 
Tours truly, 

E. LrvETT, 
Jas Mooney. 
International Commission, JJ.M.W. of A. 

To tl'is letter the following reply was sent: — 

Western Canada Coal Oper.\tors' Assocutiox, 

Caloary, Alta., September 24, 1920. 

E. LiVETT, 

Jas. Mooney, 

International Commission, U.M.W. of A., Dist. 18, 
Calg-ary, Alta. 

Gentlemen, — Tour letter of September 23, 1920, was considered at an 
executive meeting of the association held yesterday, the 23rd, and I was 
instructed to advise you that the matter contained therein will be referred to 
the next full meeting of the association. 

I might say that the executive committee thought it advisable to have 
fuller representation present to deal with this matter. 

Tours truly, 

W. F. McNeill, 

Secretary. 



A meeting of the Operators' Association was held on October 4 to consider the 
miners' request of September 23, and the following reply was sent : — 

October 6, 1920. 
Egbert Lhett, 
James Mooney, 

International Commission, District Xo. 18, 
U.M.W. of A. 

Gentlemen, — With further reference to your letter of September 23, 
1920, and our reply thereto — 

I beg to advise you that, after hearing your presentation this morning, 
this association took the whole matter under consideration. They are of the 
opinion that, before they can meet you to discuss this matter further, it will 
be necessary for the men who are now on strike contrary to the specific terms 
of the agreement recently arrived at to return to work. When this is an 
accomplished fact the association are prepared to meet you to consider your 
request. 

Tours truly. 

W. F. McNeill, 
Commissioner. 



ItlVOIiT OF THE DFA'Liy VIMsTKli 57 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 

To this the mine workers sent the following repl.v : — 

Calgauv, October IG, 1920. 

Mr. W. F. McISTeill, Commissioner, 

The Western Canada Coal Operators' Assoriation. 
1015 Herald Building, 
Calgary, Alta. 

De.\r Sik, — ^With further reference to your communication of the Gth 
instant, wherein you notify me of the action of your association in regard 
to our application for the reopening of the contract to discuss the granting of 
an increase to the company men of this district based on the settlement made 
in the Central Competitive Field of the United States. In your reply dated 
October 6, you pointed out that your association did not feel like granting 
our request until all the miners who are out contrary to the agreement had 
returned to work. On information that I have received, all mines are working 
and will have full crews by the 19th of October, and, therefore, I would ask 
that you call the operators together at the earliest opportunity to further 
discuss our request, and, knowing that Mr. Armstrong, Director of Coal 
Operation.?, is in town, I have taken the liberty of forwarding a copy of this 
letter to him. 

Yours very truly, 

E. LiVETT, 
J.VJIBS MOONEY, 

International Commission, 
United Mine Worlcers of America. 

The operators held a further conference on the 21st of October, at which the 
following resolution was passed: — 

Whereas an agreement was entered into between the Western Canada 
Coal Operators' Association and the TJ.M.W. of A., which fixed wages and 
working conditions in District jSIo. 18 from April 1, 1920, until April 1, 1922; 
And whereas, during the interim between the making of said agreement 
and the present time, there have arisen conditions which influence us to pay 
an additional $1.15 per day to day men and a pro rata additional to boys; 

Be it therefore resolved that such additional payment be granted if, 
as, and when, and from the date adequate compensation in an increase in 
the selling price of coal is granted by the Director of Coal Operations to the 
coal operators. 
A copy of the foregoing resolution was handed to the Director of Coal Opera- 
tions, who %greed to the granting of a further increase in the selling prices of fuel, 
provided the operators decided to grant the men an advance in wages. On the 23rd 
the following letter was dispatched to the United Mine Workers by the Secretary 
of the Western Canada Coal Operators' Association : — 

October 23, 1920. 
E. LrvETT, 
Jas. Mooxey, 

International Commission, U.M.~W. of A., District No. 18, 
Calgary, Alta. 

Gentlemen, — Eeferring to your letter of October 16, 1920, we beg to advise 
that this association, after careful consideration of the matter at issue, has 
decided as follows: — 

(1) That we will pay an additional $1.15 per day to day men. 



58 DEP.iiaWJEM' OF LAIiUUR 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

(2) That we will pay an additional 54 cents, 61 cents, 70 cents, $1.01, 
respectively, to the boy rates of $2.97. $3.40, $3.87, $5.58. 

This additional pay to become effective as of Monday, October 25, 1920. 

Tours truly, 

"W. F. McNeill, 

Secretary. 
Western Canada Coal Operator Association. 

On the 25th a joint conference was held between representativee of the operators 
and the miners at which the following resolution was adopted : — 

RESOLUTION 

(1) That an additional be given of $2.50 per day to day men over that 
paid October 31, 1919. Including 92 cents war bonus. 

(2) Tliat an additional be given boys equal to that given in the Com- 
petitive Field since October 31, 1919. Including 92 cents war bonus. 

The same to date from the signing of the above. 
Dated at Calgary, Alta., October 25, 1919. 

.■ACCEPTED 

On behalf of District 18, Western Canada Coal 

United Mine "\yorkers of America, Operators' Association, 

E. LivETT, John Sh.wks, 

J.\s. MooNEY, Vice-President. 

Commissioners. W. F. McNeill, 

Secretary. 

(The report of the director here sets forth a statement showing the day wage rates 
before and after the increases were granted.) 

Price of Coal Increased 

Following the granting of the foregoing increases, the Director of Coal Oper- 
ations authorized the following advances in the selling prices of fuel f.o.b. the mines, 
from October 1, 1920:— 

Coke $1 00 per ton. 

Anthracite 85 

Bituminous 60 " 

Lignite (Drumheller) 60 " 

Lignite (Lethbridge) 65 

When the foregoing advances were authorized, it was decided, in the interests of 
the consuming public, that an official audit should be conducted of some of the 
principal mines to ascertain if there was an excess charge in the selling prices of 
fuel. As a consequence the services of Mr. David S. Kerr, C. A., of Montreal, were 
secured for this purpose. After making a thorough audit of mines in various parts 
of the district, he decided that the prices charged for fuel were fair and equitable. 

Question of Directorship 

As the legislation regarding the appointment and jurisdiction of the Director of 
Coal Operations expires vrith the present session of Parliament, it was deemed advis- 
able to notify the Western Canada Coal Operators' Association and the United Mine 
Workers of America to the foregoing effect. The following comiuunication was 
therefore sent to the secretaries of the organizations concerned: — 



HEPOin' OP' THE DEl'lTY MIM.STEIl 59 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 

Calgary, Alta., January 13, 1921. 

Dear Sir, — The present legislation regarding the appointment and juris- 
diction of the Director of Coal Operations will expire at the end of the next 
session of Parliament, which will probably be some time during the month of 
May. I am advised by the ifinister of Labour that it is not the intention of th« 
Government to renew this legislation. 

In view of the foregoing I deem it advisable to notify your association of 
these facts, in order that you may discuss the same at your annual meeting 
which I understand will take place to-morrow. 

I take this occasion to express my very high appreciation of the assistance 
and loyal support rendered by the officers and members of your association, at 
all times during my term of oflSce. 

Tours faithfully. 

W. H. AbjI STRONG, 

Director of Coal Operations. 

The Secretary of the Western Canada Coal Operators' Association replied as 
follows : — 

Calgary, Alta., January 14, 1921. 
W. H. Armstrong, Esq., 

Director of Coal Operations, 
121 8th Avenue West, 
Calgary, Alta. 
Dear Sir, — On behalf of the Western Canada Coal Operators' Association, 
I desire to acknowledge receipt of your letter of January 13, advising that it 
is not the intention of the Dominion Government to renew, after the end of 
the next session, the legislation covering your appointment and jurisdiction 
as Director of Coal Operations. 

During your tenure of oiSce the country and the coal mining industry have 
passed through the most critical period in the history of either. Arising out 
of the unprecedented conditions due to the European War, countless problems 
presented themselves, calling for all the sagacity, partriotism and fairness that 
those interested in them were capable of bringing to their solution. By n-j 
other means co-uld the industry have carried on. 

I am instructed by the association, on its behalf and on behalf of each 
and every member of it, to eay that the fact that the industry has carried on 
with a minimum of interruption during that critical period, that its problems 
have been met and solved in a spirit of fairness and justice to all concerned, 
and that it is to-day on a sounder basis than probably ever before in its history, 
with a confident outlook on the future, is due in very considerable measure to 
your uniform kindness, co-operation and guidance during your term of otfice, 
and that the association and its members view with regret the discontinuance 
of your office and the duties thereof. 

The association further wishes to go on record as hoping that these duties 
will be continued at least until the end of May, 1921, or until such other date 
as the close of the next session of the Dominion Legislature automatically 
brings them to an end, and that in such matters as may come up in the mean- 
time the association may continue to have the benefit of the co-operation which 
you have extended to it in the past. 

Expressing, in conclusion, the thanks of the association, I am, 

Yours faithfully, 

W. E. MciSTEiLL, 
Secretary. 



60 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

The following communication appertaining to this matter was forwarded to the 
Minister of Labour by the officers of the United Mine Workers : — 

Caloary, Alta.. January 24, 1921. 

HoxouHABLE Sm, — We are in receipt of a communication from Mr. W. II. 
Armstrong, Director of Coal Operations, drawing our attention to the fact that 
he has beeta. requested by you to advise us that it is not the intention of the Gov- 
ernment to renew the legislation concerning his office. It is with much concern 
that we read this communication, realizing as we do the excellent work that 
has been accomplished by Mr. Armstrong and his assistants. 

After carefully considering all phases of the past and present situations 
of the mining industry, we are of the opinion that it would be an error not to 
renew and keep in operation the above mentioned commission. You are awar^ 
that there has been in the past few years much discontent in the labour world 
and especially in the coal mining industry of this district. Through the able 
assistance rendered by the coal director's office to both the operators and the 
employees throughout Alberta and south-eastern British Columbia, the mines 
have been able to produce one million more tons of coal in the year 1920 than 
in any previous year. When the Commission was appointed it was for the 
purpose of meeting a critical situation existing at that time, and we are of the 
opinion that, in the not far distant future, conditions will arise which will need 
just as able statesmanship to negotiate the obstacles with which we shall be 
confronted. 

In view of the fact that the Director of Coal Operations is the accepted 
chairman during his term of office in the settlement of disputes which may 
arise out of our contract, if this commission is abolished it may have a serious 
effect upon the present working agreement now existing between the operators 
and the employees in District Eighteen. 

We believe that it would be to the best interests of the coal mining industry 
and the general public if the office of the Director of Coal Operations were 
continued at least until the expiration of the present agreement, which is 
March 31, 1922. We respectfully suggest for your consideration that the 
Government would seriously consider the foregoing request. 

Wo have the honour to be, sir. 

Yours very truly, 

Egbert Livett, 
James Mooney, 
Int. CoDimission, U. -1/. IT. of A. 

A deputation from the Western Canada Coal Operators' Association proceeded 
to Ottawa and interviewed the Minister of Labour, on the 4th of Fdbruary, with regard 
to the continuance of the position of Director of Coal Operations. Senator Eobertson 
promised careful consideration of the request and an early reply. At the present 
time the question is understood to be receiving the serious thought of the Government. 

Coal Productios During 1919 and 1920 

Appended herewith is a comparative statement of the production of coal in 
District Eighteen for the years 1919 and 1920: — 

Output for South Eastern British Columbia, 1919 640,318 tons. 

Output for Alberta, 1919 5,028,412 " 

Total output for 1919 5,662,730 " 



itEi'oiir OF riiK DKin TV Miyii^rr.n 6i 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 

Oulpul lor South Kastorn British Ccilnnil.i.i . 1020 043,933 tons. 

Out|)ut for Alberta, 1920 6,908,923 •' 



Total output for 1020 7,852,8,';8 " 

Increased cutout for 1020 over 1910 2,190,128 tons. 

Attached to this report are comparative statements of rates of wages paid in 
District Eighteen and other mining centres which are adjacent to or in. competition 
with this area. Statistics have also been prepared showing the number of employees 
working at the principal mines in the district and the coal production in the area 
concerned. (These statements are not here reproduced.) 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

W. H. AEMSTRON.G, 

(per F. E. H.^rhison') 

Director of Goal Operalions. 

C.\LG.4RV. ALliliHT.V, 

September 5, 1921. 



62 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 



V. RECOKD OF STRIKES FOE THE YEAR 

During the year 1920 there was reduced strike activity in Canada and a conse- 
quent reduction in time loss. In fact, the time loss due to strikes was practically back 
to the average of the past twenty years. 

Elsewhere in this report, the proceedings taken during the year under the Indus- 
trial Disputes Investigation Act, 1907. and, also, the conciliation work of the depart- 
ment, are set forth. However, the disputes so dealt with in the other chapters on 
conciliation are disputes which did not always develop into strikes, some because of 
the operations of the Industrial Disputes Investigation Act, and others because strikes 
were arrested by efforts of the department. There remains a considerable number 
of strikes, most of them of secondary importance, which come before the department 
chiefly from the statistical point of view. 

As readers of these reports are aware, the Department of Labour was established 
in 1900 and began at that time a record of strikes and lockouts, a record which in 
process of time has become of considerable value for the purposes of industrial 
history. The information gathered on. the subject is printed from month to month 
in the pages of the Lahour Gazette and summarized in the form of an annual state- 
ment for the calendar year, which also is printed in the Lahour Gazette. The figure* 
are given for the calendar rather than the fiscal year, because in this form they 
become more easily comparable with statistics on the same subject gathered in other 
countries, which also as a rule use the calendar year. The figures printed are inclusive 
of all strikes which come to the knowledge of the department, and the methods taken 
to secure information practically preclude probability of omissions of a serious nature. 
So far as concerns figures given with respect to duration of strikes, numbers of 
employees concerned, etc., it is impossible always to secure exact information, but the 
estimate made in such cases is a careful approximation based on the experience of the 
officers who have become skilled in these matters. 

The record of the department includes lockouts not less than strikes, but a lockout, 
or an industrial condition which is clearly a lookout, is rarely encountered in Canada. 

There were 285 strikes and lockouts in Canada during the calendar year. Of 
this number, fourteen were carried over from 1919, making a net total of 272 strikes 
commencing in 1920. The number of employees involved in the 285 disputes was 
52,150, and the number of employers was 1,272. The total time loss was estimated at 
886,754 working days. This is ascertained by multiplying the number of men directly 
affected through a strike or lockout Iby the number of working days they are sa 
affected during the time the firm or establishment is involved. 

A strike or lockout, counted as such by the Department of Labour, is a cessation 
of work involving six or more employees and of not less than forty-eight hours' dura- 
tion. Unless a dispute corresponds to this definition it is not classified as a strike 
or lockout, and is not included in the officially published statistics, although, for 
departmental purposes, it is recorded. There were 47 of these disputes, involving 
4,759 employees and a time loss of 4,507 working days, during 1920. 

There were several prominent strikes which contributed largely to the total time 
loss. Among these were: A strike of shipyard employees at Halifax from June 1 to 
August 11, involving 2,000 employees and a time loss of 104,000 working days; a 
strike of power development employees, engaged on the Chippawa canal project, from 
June 19 to July 12, involving 2,000 employees and a time loss of 36,000 working days; 
a strike and lockout of steamfitters, metal workers and machinists at Montreal, from 
August 13 to August 31, involving 3,000 employees and a time loss of 48,000 working 



IIEPORI' OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 63 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 

days; and a strike of miners in the Alberta coal fields from October 5 to October 19, 
involving 3,402 eniiployces and a time lo^s of 38,075 working days. 

In about 3 per cent of the strikes, 1,000 or more employees were involved, and 
in about 60 per cent of the strikes less than lOO employees were involved. As to 
duration, 46 per cent of the strikes were in existence for 10 days and under; about 
57 per cent were under 15 days' duration, and about 22 per cent were over 30 days' 
duration. Four were unterminated at the end of the year. 

Classified by provinces, Ontario had more strikes than any other province, with 
35-8 per cent of the total. Quelbec was second with 18-6 per cent and British 
Columbia third with 18-2 per cent. Ontario also had the greatest time loss, 228,992 
working days, or nearly 26 per cent of the total, having been lost through strikes in 
this province. Quebec had the nest largest number in this respect also, with a loss 
of 221.328 working days, or 25 per cent of the total. 

The class of industry most affected during 1920 was metals, machinery and 
conveyances, in which there were 65 strikes, involving 13,250 employees and a time 
loss of 349,295 working days. Forty-five strikes, involving 11,790 employees and a 
time loss of 165,509 working days, occurred in the mines, smelters, quarries and 
clay products gi-oup. Thirty-four strikes involving 4,840 emplo,yees and a time loss 
of 72,878 working days, occurred in the building and construction group. Thirty- 
three strikes, involving 3,852 employees and a time loss of 79,054 working days, 
occurred in the lumbering industry. 

Classified by causes, 205 of the 285 strikes recorded involved wages. Of this 
number, 134 were solely for increased wages, 40 for increased wages and shorter 
hours, 24 for increased wages and other changes, and 7 were because of a reduction 
in wages. Twenty-one strikes involved union recognition or were in protest against 
non-union labour, and 22 strikes were in protest against discharge of employees. 

The record shows that 125 of the strikes terminated in favour of employers 
and 66 in favour of the employees; 69 were compromise settlements, while 25 were 
indefinite or unterminated. 

As regards methods of settlement, 116 strikes terminated as a result of direct 
negotiations between the parties in dispute, 42 terminated through the efforts of 
conciliation or mediation (almost entirely of the Department of Labour), 4 by 
arbitration and 7 by the operation of the Industrial Disputes Investigation Act. 
In 57 strikes the employees resumed work on their employers' terms, and in 36 
strikes the strikers were replaced hy other workers. 

There were several disputes — notably those of moulders at Hamilton, Preston 
and Collingwood, painters at Windsor, inachinists at St. John, engineers at 
Hamilton and plumbers and steamfitters at Vancouver — which the unions concerned 
still regarded as unterminated at the end of the year, but in which conditions were 
no longer affected or which ceased to come under the department's definition of a 
strike. 

The accompanying tables give in statistical form particulars of the trade 
disputes in Canada during 1920, with a summary of the record for the past twenty 
years. 

The record printed hereunder shows the number of strikes and lockouts year by 
year for the period of 1901-1920. The record reached its highest level for the year 
1919, principally because of the Winnipeg general strike, beginning in May. The 
figures for 1919 were almost twice those of the year which stands next in the list 
as to time losses on account of strikes, those, namely, for 1911, when the high 
number had been occasioned by a prolonged strike of coal miners in Western Canada. 

The lightest year in the record both as to the number of strikes and time losses 
is 1915, the second year of the war. It may be added that the calendar year 1921 
indicates less strike activity than during the same period of last year. In 1920, to 
June 30, the figures were : number of disputes, 195 ; number of employers involved. 



€4 



DEPARTMEXT OF LABOUR 



12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

746 ; number of employees affected, 35,005 ; time loss in working days, 523,526. In 
1921, during the same interval, the figures are: number of strikes, 121; number of 
employers involved, -152; number of cmplo.yees affected, 16,363; number of workina: 
days lost, 499,875. 

Following is the record of strikes and lockouts by years for the period 1901-20 : — 





Number of Disputes 


Disputes 


n existence in the year 


Year 


In existence 
in the 


Beginning 
in the 


Employers 
involved 


Employees 
involved 


Time loss 

in working 

days 






year 






1901... 


104 
121 


104 
121 


273 
420 


28,086 
12,264 


632,311 


1902... 


120,940 


1903 


14B 


146 


927 


50,041 


1,226,500 


1904... 


99 


99 


575 


16,482 


265,004 


1905,,. 


89 


88 


437 


12.223 


217,244 


1906. . . 


141 


141 


1.015 


26,050 


359, 797 


1907, , , 


149 


144 


825 


36,624 


621,962 


I90S. , . 


68 


65 


175 


25,293 


708,285 


1909 . 


69 


69 


397 


17,. 332 


871,845 


1910.. 


84 


82 


1,335 


21,280 


718,635 


1911.. 


99 


96 


475 


30.094 


2,046,650 


1912. . 


150 


148 


989 


40,511 


1,099,208 


1913... 


113 


100 


1,015 


39,536 


1,287,678 


1914., 


44 


40 


205 


8.678 


430,054 


1915.. 


43 


38 


96 


9,140 


106, 149 


1916.. 


75 


74 


271 


21,157 


208,277 


1917 . 


148 


141 


714 


48.329 


1,134,970 


1918,,. 


196 


191 


766 


68,489 


763,241 


1919. , 


298 


290 


1.913 


138,988 


3,942,189 


1920 , 


285 


272 


1,272 


52,150 


886,754 


Total 


2,521 


2,455 


14,095 


702,747 


17,647,793 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY "INISTER 65 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 

VI. LABOUR GAZETTE 

The Labour Gazelle lias been publislied monthly in both the English and the 
French language. Various supplements on important questions have also been 
published during the year. In addition to being the official record of proceedings 
under the Industrial Disputes Investigation Act, 1907, the Labour Gazette prints 
either complete or summarized reports of proceedings of official commissions and of 
international and other important conferences held in this and other countries, 
that bear on industrial matters. The Labour Gazette also collects and compiles in 
condensed form information upon industrial disputes and agreements, fluctuations 
in employment, changes in wages and hours of labour, the course of wholesale and 
retail prices in Canada and other countries, fatal industrial accidents, apprentice- 
ship, technical education, and other matters. In order that such information with 
respect to Canada shall be as complete as possible, the department maintains corres- 
pondents in some sixty industrial centres in the Dominion. New legislation 
enacted by the Federal and Provincial Parliaments bearing upon wages and hours 
of labour, workmen's compensation, minimum wages for women, and upon industry 
generally, is recorded in the Labour Gazette; and condensed reports are given of 
legal proceedings and decisions affecting labour. 

In the preparation of Volume XX of the Labour Gazette, which covers the calendar 
year 1920, great care has been taken to present the material in as concise a form as 
possible, in order both to facilitate the work of reference and to effect economy in 
the matter of space. 

The Labour Gazette, being an official publication, and the matter appearing 
therein being largely of a specialized nature, its contents become frequently a matter 
of quotation. Credit to the Labour Gazette is usually given where the publication 
quoting is of recognized standing, and the journals named below are among those 
which, during the year, reprinted, in whole or in part, original articles appearing in 
the Labour Gazette. The following list is by no means inclusive, and does not of 
course include ordinary references to the monthly statistical articles on employ- 
ment, prices, etc. : — International Labour Review, International Labour Office — 
Daily Intelligence, British Labour Gazette, Labour Overseas, United States Monthly 
Labour Review, Bloomfield's Labour Digest, Queensland Industrial Gazette, 
Economic World, Industrial League and Council Journal, Industrial News Survey, 
Canadian ^Mining Journal, Canada Lumberman, Canadian Railroader, Personnel, 
Christian Guardian, Canadian Forum, Montreal Gazette, Montreal Herald, Toronto 
Mail and Empire, Toronto Star, Ottawa Citizen, Ottawa Journal, Winnipeg Tribune, 
Edmonton Journal, Halifax Chronicle, Halifax Herald, Hamilton Spectator, Mari- 
time Record, Port Arthur Chronicle. 



37—5 



66 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

VII. STATISTICS OF PRICES AND WAGES 

During tlie year the statistical work carried on in the department witli respect 
to prices and wages was marked by considerable development along the lines followed 
since 1910, looking to the calculation of index numbers to show fluctuations in the 
cost of living and in wages, corresponding to the index number of wholesale prices 
in Canada, first issued in 1910, and continued from month to month in the Labour 
Gazette. The issue of the Labour Gazette for March, 1921, contained a statement of 
the results of preliminary calculations made from the data then at hand, suitable 
for this purpose, and pending the completion of the collection of the data for more 
comprehensive index numbers. 

With respect to prices statistics, the feature of the work of the year was the 
beginning of the publication on a gieatl.v extended basis of the retail prices of foods, 
this being possible as a result of the arrangements made during 1919 and 1920 under 
the Statistics Act with the Dominion Bureau of Statistics for the collection and 
compilation of statistics of prices. The publication of figures on the new basis 
began in the Labour Gazette issue for February, 1921, the statistics being for the 
beginning of January. For each locality in Canada with a population of approximately 
10,000 or over, the Bureau of Statistics, at the beginning of each month, secures, 
from a number of repre.^entitive grocers and butchers, reports showing the selling 
prices of over one hundred staple groceries and foods. Care is taken that the dealers 
selected are reasonably representative of those from whom workingmen buy their 
food supplies. The local resident correspondents of the Labour Gazette also secure 
reports from dealers in food. The averages of the prices so reported for the various 
commodities for each city are calculated. From 1910 to 1920, inclusive, the statistics 
of retail food prices published in the Labour Gazette were the figures reported 
by the Labour Gazette correspondents, who naturally were unable to secure and 
compile statistics from a large number of dealers. The difficulty of selecting 
one or two butchers and grocers whose prices might be regarded as repre- 
sentative of those paid by workingmen has been found very great, the suitability 
of a particular dealer being usiially a matter of personal opinion. The desirability 
of publishing the averages of prices for a fairly large number of dealers is therefore 
evident. The Dominion Bureau of Statistics was established by the Statistics Act, 
191S, the Dominion Statistician being Mr. K'. H. Coats, Associate Editor of the 
Labour Gazette from 1902 to 1915 and the officer in charge of the statistics of the 
department during that period. Arrangements were, therefore, made to use the 
authority and facilities of the new Bureau for the development of prices statistics 
on a broader basis. It will, of course, be remembered that the Bureau of Statistics is 
administered under the authority of the Minister of Trade and Commerce, but there 
has been a cordial co-operation between the two departments with respect to these 
matters. 

With respect to fuel and light, as in the past, the prices for coal, wood, and coal 
oil published are those reported by the Labour Gazette correspondents, but steps have 
been taken to secure these figures through the Bureau of Statistics and also to secure 
statistics as to rates for gas, electricity, etc. 

In regard to rentals, as since 1910, the prevailing rates for six-roomed working- 
men's houses reported by the Labour Gazette correspondents each month are pub- 
lished. An extensive survey of rental conditions, begun in 1919, has been continued, 
and supplementary information needed from time to time has been secured by the 
dtpartmental correspondents from real estate agents, etc. Since 1919 statistics as to 
the current rent for a large number of houses of various sizes have been secured 
iu tlie spring and autumn in the various cities, the number of houses included varying 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MiyiBTER 67 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 

from approximiiitely one hundred in the smaller cities to over one thousand in the 
larger. The maintenance of these records up-to-date will furnish a broad basis for 
statistics as to house rents. 

The statistical branch has also proceeded with the collection of information as 
to the retail prices of clothing, boots, and other items of expenditure for families, 
merchants being good enough to compile and forward many particulars from time 
to time. : 

As in previous years, the statistics of retail prices and cost of living have been 
in considerable demand in conneetion with changes in wages, employers and employees 
having iigreed, in many cases, to adjust wage rates according to the changes in the 
cost of living as shown by the departmental records and by the figures published in 
the Labour Gazette. 

The coal mining district of Vancouver Island has continued the arrangement 
made at the end of 1918 whereby the changes in the cost of living every three months 
are ascertained by a commission and a corresponding change in wages is calculated. 
Such adjustments in wages are in the nature of a flat increase (or decrease) for all 
classes of employees, including the clerical and oiEce staffs. The following adjust- 
ments were recommended and made during the fiscal year: May, 1920, an increase of 
34J-36 cents per day; August 1, 1920, an increase of 11-lli cents per day; November 
1, 1920, an increase of 51-6 cents per day; February 1, 1921, a decrease of 40i-42i 
cents per day. The lower of the two rates is for mines where the base rate was $3 per 
day and the higher where the base rate was $3.15 per day. The commission consists of 
Mr. John McAllister, representing the miners; Mr. Tully Boyce, representing the 
operators; and Mr. D. T. Bulger, Fair Wages Officer of the Department of Labour, 
chairman. 

The statistics as to changes in prices and in the cost of living in other countries 
have also proved to be of great interest and, owing to the fact that nearly every com- 
mercial country in the world compiles and publishes official statistics of prices, a con- 
siderable development of this feature of the statisical work of the department has 
been necessary. Statistics of wholesale prices have also been in great demand, more 
particularly because of the light thrown by them on the changes in industrial and 
trade conditions so pronounced in recent months. 

In wage statistics the records of the rates of wages and of hours of labour for 
the important trades in the various industries have been brought up to date and the 
scope of the work has been considerably enlarged. Statistics are now secured regularly 
from a large number of employers, from labour unions, and also through the depart- 
mental activities in connection with fair wages, industrial disputes, conciliation 
boards, the Employment Service, etc. Arrangements have been made whereby com- 
pilations of the rates of wages at which vacancies are filled by the various employ- 
ment offices throughout the Dominion are made and forwarded. 

In connection with statistics of wages, the collection, fyling, and analysis of 
industrial agreements for the department is carried on, and during the past year it 
has been possible to secure and summarize for publication in the Labour Gazette a 
very large number of such agreements, as well as of schedules of rates of wages, hours 
of labour, and other working conditions. Such agreements entered into or schedules 
adopted or put in force by governmental authorities, as well as those of individual 
or corporate employers, have been included. 

The department also undertook to secure for the Civil Service Commission infor- 
mation as to rates of wages, hours of labour, and other working conditions in certain 
centres for those classes of employees paid by the Government according to the rates 
prevailing locally. The initial inquiry was conducted chiefly by the Fair Wages 
Officers of the department, assisted by other members of the staff, and in some cases 
by the Labour Gazette correspondents. Arrangements have been made to keep the 
information up to date in connection with the regular statistical records by means 
of returns from employers, trade unions, etc. 

37 — 5i 



68 



DEPARTMEyr OF LABOUR 



12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

As mentioned in the first paragraph, the department issued its first publication 
on wage statistics as a supplement to the issue of the Labour Gazette for March, 1921, 
the bulletin giving the rates of wages and hours of labour per week for some twenty- 
one classes of labour from 1901 to 1920 in thirteen of the most important industrial 
centres in Canada. The classes of labour included were: building trades — brick- 
layers, carpenters, electrical workers, painters, plumbers, stonecutters, and builders' 
labourers; metal trades^blacksmiths, boilermakers, iron moulders, machinists, and 
sheet metal workers; printing trades — compositors, hand, in newspaper offices, and 
pressmen, cylinder, in job offices; electric street railways — conductors and motormen; 
steam railways — conductors, brakemen, engineers, and firemen, all on freight trains, 
telegraphers and section men. The cities included were Halifax, St. John, Quebec, 
Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, Hamilton, "Winnipeg, Eegina, Calgary, Edmonton, Van- 
couver, and Victoria. 

From the figures thus compiled index numbers were calculated, taking the year 
1913 as the base; that is, making rates of that year equal to 100 and calculating the 
percentage levels above and below shown by rates for the various classes in the cities 
included. From these were made index numbers for trades and cities and averages 
for each group and for all twenty-one trades in order to show approximately the 
average changes in weekly and hourly rates. The bulletin also gave in a supple- 
mentary table a number of sample rates from year to year for several classes of 
labour obtained from particular factories of various kinds and from firms in the 
lumbering industry. Of these samples thirty-five were for common labour in 
factories, and seventy-two for trades in textile, furniture, carriage, harness 
and saddlery, boots and shoes, tobacco, meat packing, and pulp and 
paper manufacturing establishments. In lumbering and saw-milling only fifteen 
samples were given, six of which were for fresh operations and nine for saw-milling. 
Index numbers were calculated also from these figures in the same way as for the 
twenty-one classes in the thirteen cities. 

The accompanying tables give in summary form the results of these calculations. 
These figures indicate that by 1920 hourly rates for some classes of labour had risen 
to levels somewhat more than 100 per cent above 1913 rates, but that for the same 
classes weekly rates were hardly 100 per cent higher than in 1913, the difference being- 
due to decreases in hours worked per week. 



INDEX NUMBERS OF RATES OF WAGES FOR 21 CLASSES IN 13 CITIES OF CANADA, 1901- 

Rates in 1913 = 100 


■1920 


Year 


Building Trades 
7 Classes 


Metal Trades 
5 Classes 


Printing Trades 
2 Classes 


Street Railways 
1 Class 


Steam 
Railways 
6 Classes 


Average for 
21 Classes 




Weekly 
rates 


Hourly 

rates 


Weekly 
rates 


Hourly 
rates 


Weekly 

rates 


Hourly 
rates 


Weekly 
rates 


Hourly 
rates 


♦Rates 


Weekly 
rates 


tHourly 
rates 


IBOl 


69-3 
73-2 
74-6 
76-3 
78-6 
81-7 
84-8 
85-9 
87-3 
90-0 
92-6 
97-4 
100 
100-3 
100-5 
101-5 
108-8 
123-8 
142-9 
171-9 


60-3 
64-2 
67-4 
69-7 
73-0 
76-9 
80-2 
81-5 
83- 1 
86-9 
90-2 
06-0 
100 
100-8 
101-5 
102-4 
109-9 
125-9 
148-2 
180-9 


72-8 
74-2 
76-2 
78-9 
81-3 
82-4 
85-0 
87-3 
88-6 
89-6 
92-2 
95-9 
1000 
100-4 
101-2 
110-4 
124-0 
146-7 
165-3 
189-3 


68-6 
70-2 
73-3 
75-9 
78-6 
79-8 
82-4 
84-7 
86-2 
88-8 
91-0 
95-3 
100-0 
100-5 
101-5 
106-9 
128-0 
155-2 
180-1 
209-4 


66-6 
68-3 
69-0 
72-3 
74-2 
75-8 
79-3 
81-5 
838 
88-2 
91-8 
96-0 
100-0 
102-4 
103-6 
106-8 
111-3 
123-7 
145-5 
181-7 


600 
61-6 
62-6 
66-1 
68-5 
72-2 
78-4 
80-5 
83-4 
87-8 
91-6 
96-0 
100 
102-4 
103-6 
105-8 
111-3 
123-7 
145-9 
184-0 


65-7 
70-0 
72-1 
740 
74-4 
76-7 
82-2 
82-5 
81-5 
86-5 
88-1 
92-3 
1000 
100-6 
97-4 
10/ -6 
115-1 
130-3 
150-5 
179-1 


64-0 
68-0 
71-1 
73-1 
73-5 
75-7 
81-4 
81-8 
81-1 
85-7 
88-1 
92-3 
1000 
101-0 
97-8 
102-2 
114-6 
112-9 
163-3 
194-2 


70-8 
73-6 
76-7 
78-6 
78-9 
80-2 
85-5 
86-7 
86-7 
91-2 
96-4 
98-3 
100-0 
101-7 
101-7 
104-9 
1101 
133-2 
154-2 
186 -6 


69-8 
72-7 
74-2 
76-4 
78-6 
80-8 
83-9 
85-5 
86-9 
89-4 
92-1 
96-4 
100. 
100-6 
101-0 
110-3 
114-5 
131-6 
151-0 
179-3 


64-9 


1902 


67-8 


1803 


70-7 


igot 


73-1 


1905 


75-3 


1906 


77-9 


1907 


81-9 


1908 


83-3 


1909 


84-5 


1910 


88-4 


1911 


91-2 


1912 


96-2 


MM 

1914 


1000 

101-1 


1915 


101-6 


1918 


105-2 


1917. 


114-8 


1918 


135 1 


1919 


158-0 


1920 


190-3 







•Per mile, day, etc. 

tlncludes index numbers of mileage rates, etc., on steam railways. 



REI'OIIT OF THE DEPCrT MiyiSTEIl 69 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 

supplp;mentary index numbers of sample rates of wages for common labour in 

FACTORIES, miscellaneous FACTORY TRADES. AND LUMBER INDUSTRY: 1911-1920. 

Rates in 1913 = 100 



Year 


Common Labour in 
Factories; 
.35 Samples 


Miscellaneous Factory 
Trades: 

72 Samples 


Lumbering: 
15 .Samples 




Hourly 

rates 


Weekly 

rates 


Hourly 

rates 


Weekly 

rates 


Hourly 

rates 


Weekly 

rates 


1911 


94-9 
98- 1 

100 

101 
1010 
110-4 
129-2 
152-3 
180-2 
215-3 


99-8 

98-9 

100 

100-3 
lOO-O 
108-3 
126-6 
145-6 
167-9 
198-3 


95-4 

97-1 

100 

103-2 
106-2 
1151 
128-0 
146-8 
180-2 
216-8 


94-9 

99-3 

100 

102-9 
105-8 
114-3 
126-7 
142-6 
164-5 
192-9 


96-3 

98-8 

100 

94-7 
.89-1 
109-5 
130-2 
1.50-5 
169-8 
202-7 


96-3 


1912 


98-8 


1913 


100 


11)14 


94-7 


191.5 


S9-0 


1916 


109-5 


1917 


130-3 


191S 


149-6 


1919 


165-3 


1920 .... 


191-4 







It appears that in the unskilled and semi-skilled classes the increases in rates of 
■wages since 191.3 were usually about 100 per cent, while in the skilled trades the 
increases averaged about 80 per cent. 

It is interesting to compare these wage figures with the statements printed also 
in the March issue of the Labour Gazette, with respect to increases in the cost of 
living, from which the accompanying table and descriptive note are reproduced. 

The information thus collected would indicate that wages hardly kept pace in 
the average with increases in the cost of living; hourly rates, however, showed 
somewhat steeper advances than weekly rates and, during a period of steady employ- 
ment with an increase of overtime, would tend to considerably increase earnings. 



OosT of Living in Canada 

In addition to the statistics as to retail prices of food and fuel, and as to rates 
for rent, the department during the past year secured figures as to retail prices of 
staple lines of clothing, including footwear, from retail dealers throughout Canada, 
for the years 1913-1920. The figures relate to prices prevailing at the end of the 
year in each case, but in 1920 and 1921 prices during spring were also secured. From 
these quotations the percentages of changes in the cost of clothing have been calcu- 
lated. Information was also secured as to the prices of household supplies, furniture, 
furnishings, etc., and an estimate has been made as to the percentage changes in the 
cost of miscellaneous items, the effect of the information gathered showing that such 
changes are approximately equal to the average changes in other items. The percent- 
age changes in food, fuel and rent have been calculated from the weekly budgets 
published in the Labour Gazette from month to month, and the accompanying table 
summarizes the changes from year to year by groups, the figures for each group 
and for all items being weighted according to the family budget method. 



70 



DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 



12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

CHANGES IN THE COST OF LIVING IN CANADA FROM 1913 TO 1921 
(Percentages of increase in cost by groups over 1913) 



Date 


Food 


Fuel 


Rent 


Clothing 


Sundries 


All 




8 

11 

38 

67 

86 

101 

130 

102 

80 

52 


2* 
3* 

10 

34 

63 

66 

91 
118 
109 

97 


8* 
16* 
14* 

6* 

•> 

17 
34 
39 
39 
43 


10 

26 

43 

67 

98 

134 

160 

135 

95 

73 







December 1915 


5 
10 
45 
60 
SO 
90 
90 
87 
81 


4 


December 1916 


19 


December 1917 


43 


December 1918 


61 


December 1919 


79 


Julv 1920 


101 


December 1920 


92 


March 1921 .. 


77 


June 1921 


63 







' Decrease. 



REPORT OF Tin: DEl'VTY MINlHTIUt 71 

SESSIONAI, PAPER No. 37 



VIII. JOINT INDUSTKIAL COUNCILS 

It will be recalled that one of the most interesting sections of the report of tho 
Royal Commission on Industrial Eelations, which, under the chairmanship of the 
Honourable Chief Justice Mathers, sat during 1919, was that relating to shop 
committees and industrial councils, and the Commissioners strongly .urged the adop- 
tion in Canada of the principles underlying the Whitley Councils and other kindred 
systems, recommending that "a commencement should be made with joint plant 
councils, and the more extensive organization of district and national councils evolved 
therefrom as their necessity and practicability become apparent." 

The subject was discussed also at the National Industrial Conference composed 
of representatives of the Dominion and Provincial Governments and representative 
employers and labour men, held at Ottawa in September, 1919, on invitation of the 
Government of Canada, and the committee to which the matter was referred reported 
unanimously in the following terms:— 

"Your committee is of the opinion that there is urgent necessity for 
greater co-operation between employer and employee. We believe that this 
co-operation can be furthered by the establishment of joint industrial councils. 
Tour committee does not believe it is wise or expedient to recommend any set 
plan for such councils. 

" We therefore recommend that a bureau should be established by the 
Department of Labour of the Federal Government to gather data and furnish 
information whenever requested by employers and employees or organizations 
of employers or employees that whenever it is desired to voluntarily establish 
such councils the fullest assistance should be given by the bureaiu." 

While it has not been deemed necessary or desirable at the present time to establish, 
a bureau for the purposes outlined in the resolution of the National Conference, the 
department has entered heartily into the spirit of the resolution and has continued 
and extended its study of joint industrial councils and kindred systems, and has done 
much to advance the movement. Employers throughout Canada have, at the request 
of the department, furnished information regarding joint councils or committees 
in their establishments, and the information thus received, together with information 
regarding similar systems in other countries, has been assembled and published in 
Bulletin No. 1 of the Industrial Eelations Series, as a supplement to the Labour 
Gazette of February, 1921. In addition to the wide circulation of this pamphlet with 
the Labour Gazette, it has been further distributed in response to the many inquiries 
received for information on the subject. During February also a conference met, 
at the call of the Minister of Labour, to discuss and advise as to these matters, there 
being present representatives of a number of the larger employing companies in 
Canada which have established joint councils with their employees. Spokesmen for 
the respective employers were for the most part company officers in charge of indus- 
trial relations, and the addresses in the main dealt with the experience already gained 
by these companies with joint industrial councils. A report of the proceedings of 
this conference was published in Bulletin No. 2 of the Industrial Relations Series, 
issiued as a supplement to the Lahour Gazette of March, 1921. This bulletin, like 
the first mentioned, has been largely supplied on request to various individuals and 
organizations of employers and workers. During the year the reports of the Whitley 
Committee, which were collected and published by the department in 1919, have also 
'been freely distributed to those seeking information. 



72 DEPARTMENT OF LABOVR 

'2 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

At a joint meeting of representatives of the international unions of the building 
trades and members of the Standing Labour Committee of the Association of 
Canadian Building and Construction Industries, and also representatives from special 
branches of the industry, held at Hamilton, Maj' 26, 1920, resolutions were unani- 
mously carried setting up a National Joint Conference Board of the Building and 
Construction Industries of Canada, to be composed of joint representatives elected 
or selected by the Association of Canadian Building and Construction Industries and 
five members elected or selected by the representatives of the building trades inter- 
national 'Unions. The resolution included a request that the Dominion Government 
appoint a representative to act as chairman and convener of this National Joint 
Conference Board. As a consequence of this resolution, Mv. E. McG. Quirk, of 
Montreal, was nominated by the Minister of Labour to act as chairman, and up to the 
end of March, 1921, four regular and two special meetings were presided over by him. 

The functions of the National Joint Conference Board of the Building and 
Construction Industries of Canada are of an educational and advisory nature, but 
it may deal with disputes referred to it for settlement by affiliated local organizations 
or establish local industrial boards. The National Joint Conference Board is also 
charged with the encouragement of the organization of employers and workmen of 
the building and construction industries into local joint industrial boards for the 
settlement of disputes in the building and construction industries of Canada. Vp 
to the close of the fiscal year 1920-21, there were local joint industrial boards in the 
building trades in Hamilton, Ottawa, London and Toronto, but it may be added that 
since the close of the fiscal year word has reached the department of the expected 
organization of further local joint councils in the building and construction industries. 

Reference may fittingly be made in this report to the Manitoba Joint Council 
of Industry, operating under the Industrial Conditions Act which was passed by the 
Manitoba Legislature in February, 1919, and proclaimed in 3Iarch, 1919, but 
amended at the 1920 session of the Provincial Legislature. Tlie Council was 
organized and commenced operations in May, 1920, and to the end of that year had 
held seventy-seven regular meetings, besides numerous interviews with parties inter- 
ested in eases being dealt with. 

Towards the close of the year arrangements were entered into for the appoint- 
ment b.v the Civil Service Commission of an officer to aid those requiring assistance 
in the establishment of joint industrial councils, the appointment being made only 
a few days prior to the end of the fiscal year. 

Though not precisely in the nature of a joint council and brought into existence 
by the exigencies of war in 191S, the Canadian Railway Board of Adjustment No. 
1, mentioned in previous reports, continued its work throughout the year. It will 
be recalled that it is a board of twelve, one-half being representatives of railways, 
named by the Canadian Railway Association, and one-half representatives of the 
six railway workers unions parties to the agreement, namely: (1) Brotherhood of 
Locomotive Engineers; (2) Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen and E'nginemen; 
(3) Order of Railway Conductors; (4) Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen; (5) 
Order of Railroad Telegraphers; (6) United Brotherhood of Maintenance-of-Way 
Employees and Railway Shop Labourers. The agreement provided for the reference 
to t!ie board of all disputes and tliat the decision of the board should be final. The 
board had served admirably during the war and subsequently, and was during the 
past fiscal year formally renewed. The precise plan is perhaps not applicable in its 
entirety to other than the railway industry, but its continuance and marked success 
are illustrations of the increasing disposition to dispose of industrial differences by 
direct negotiations on lines carefully thought out between the parties concerned. 



IIKI'OUT OF THE DEI'OTY MINISTER 73 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 

IX. REPORT OF EMPLOYMENT SERVICE OF CANADA 

The following is the third annual report of the Employment Service of Canada, 
being for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1921. During the year agreements under 
the Employment Offices Co-ordination Act were completed with all the i^rovincos 
except New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island. An agreement was also made 
with the city of Moncton in accordance with the provisions of the 1920 Amendment 
to the xVct. 

At the beginning of the year there were 95 employment offices operating under 
the Employment Offices Co-ordination Act ; at the end of the year the number of 
offices had decreased to 75, distributed among the provinces as f olliows : Nova 
Scotia, 4; New Brunswick, 1; Quebec, 5; Ontario, 27; Manitoba, 9; Saskatchewan, 
9; Alberta, 5; British Columbia, 15. This reduction is due to the closing of offices 
in the Maritime Provinces operated by the Department of Labour during the 
deniobili/^ation period, and to the fact that the demobilization of the Information and 
Service Branch of the Department of Soldiers' Civil Ee-establishment resulted in 
the discontinuing of a number of one-man offices throughout the Dominion. 

The agreement entered into with the provinces and with the municipality of 
Moncton followed in the main the agreement for the fiscal year 1919-30, with the 
addition of several new clauses. Fire insurance and expenditures on alterations 
in employment office premises were included under the legitimate expenditures, 
while expenditures on "university or other courses for the training of employment 
office staffs, the advancement of efficiency in employment offices and the promotion 
of interest in emjiloyment problems " were also accepted if previously agreed upon 
by both parties. The provinces were required to forward quarterly to the Minister 
of Labour statements of the persons for whom payments on account of salary were 
claimed and reports showing details of commercial employment agencies licensed. 
Reports on the work of each provincial employment service for the calendar year 
were also to be forwarded. The employment offices and clearing house of each pro- 
vince were to be listed in telephone directories under the name "JEmployment Service 
of Canada," although they might also be listed under another name. All subsidized 
offices were to be kept open for business not less than four hours on Saturdays and 
eight hours on the other daj's of the week. 

The follovring is the text of the agreement for the fiscal year 1920-21: — 

Memorandum of Agree^iext made between the Honourable Gideon D. Robert- 
son, Minister of Labour for Canada, hereinafter called 

The Party of the First Part: 

And the Province of . hereinafter represented by the 

Honourable , hereinafter called 

The Party of the Second Part: 

Whereas by the terms of the Employment Offices Co-ordination Act the sum 
of one hundred and fifty thousand dollars ($150,000) is appropriated out of the 
Consolidated Revenue Fund of Canada for the fiscal year beginning the first day of 
April, one thousand nine hundred and twenty, for the purpose of aiding and encour- 
aging the organization and co-ordination of employment offices throughout Canada, 
and for the promotion of uniformity of methods among them ; 

And whereas by the Appropriation Act, number 4, one thousand nine hundred 
and twenty, schedule " A," Parliament appropriated the sum of one hundred thou- 



74 DIJI'ARTMENT OF LABOUR 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

sand dollars ($100,000), to supplement the amount provided by the Employment 
Offices Co-ordination Act; 

And whereas it is provided in the said Employment Offices Co-ordination Act 
that the payment of the said money shall be conditional upon an agreement between 
the Minister of Labour and the Government of the province as to the terms, con- 
ditions and purposes for which the payments are to be made and applied; 

Now therefore the said parties mutually a^ee that the said moneys shall be paid 
■upon the terms and conditions as follows: 

1. The said party of the second part shall submit quarterly during the year to 
the said party of the first part such statements of expenditures and whenever requested 
such reports of work done as are required by the party of the first part, and the 
party of the first part shall recommend payment to the party of the second part 
of a sum of money which shall bear the same proi)ortion to the sum of two hundred 
and fifty thousand dollars ($250,000) as the expenditure of the party of the second 
pa-rt for the maintenance of employment offices bears to the total of the expenditures 
of all the provinces for such purposes; provided that the sum to be recommended 
to be paid shall not exceed one-half of the total amount expended by the party of 
the second part in any one quarter for the maintenance of employment offices; and 
provided that no payment shall be recommended on account of any expenditure unless 
the party of the first part is satisfied that such expenditure has properly been made 
for the purposes of and according to the terms and conditions of this agreement. 

2. The following expenditures shall be deemed to be properly made for the 
purposes of and according to the terms and conditions of this agreement : — ■ 

(a) Salaries and travelling expenses of permanent and temporary members of the 
staffs of the enaployment offices and of the clearing house operated by the 
said party of the second part, and the salary and travelling expenses of a 
general superintendent of the EmplojTuent Service of the said party of the 
second part, provided such salaries and travelling expenses shall be paid only 
to persons whose whole time is devoted to the Employment Service of the said 
party of the second part, and provided further that a statement of the persons 
for whom payments on account of salary are claimed, indicating name, 
official position and salary rate, shall be forwarded to the party of the first 
part on the' first day of each quarter; 

(6) rental, fire insurance, heat, lighti water service, office supplies (not including 
furniture), telephone, telegraph and postal expenses, and janitor service for 
the employment offices and clearing house of the party of the second part; 
provided that the premises on account of which payments are claimed under 
this section are used entirely for the purposes of the Employment Service; 

(c) expenditures on advertising in newspapers and periodicals and by billboards 
and posters necessary to the efficient operation of the employment offices of 
the said party of the second part, and not exceeding ten per centum (10%) 
of the total expenditure of the party of the Second part; provided that in all 
such advertising the Employment Service of the party of the second part 
shall be designated "Employment Service of Canada" with whatever amplifica- 
tion of such designation, if any. party of the second part may desire to 
indicate the governmental or departmental authority by which the employment 
offices are administered; 

id) expenditures on such standard signs, window lettering and stationery as may 
be agreed upon by the parties hereto ; 

(e) unrefunded advances for transportation issued to persons directed to employ- 
ment at a distance secured through the Employment Service provided that the 
party of the first part shall have the right to determine whether such advances 
are necessarily made; and provided that no payment shall be made by the 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MIXIsriCR 75 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 

party of the first part on account of losses in excess of ten per centum (10%) 

of the total advances made during the year; 
(/) expenditures as may be agreed upon by the parties hereto on university or 

other courses for the training of employment office staffs, the advancement of 

efficiency in employment offices, and the promotion of interest in employment 

problems ; 
(g) expenditures on such alterations in employment office premises as may be 

agreed upon by the partias hereto. 

3. In the operation of the employment office the party of the second part shall 
endeavour to fill situations in all trades or occupations and for both male and female 
employees. 

4. The party of the second part shall in the operation of the employment offices 
and clearing house use such forms and records as the party of the first part may 
supply. 

5. The party of the second part agrees to organize in connection -with the Em- 
ployment Service of the province a Provincial Advisory Council, and in every city 
of the province vcith a population of twenty-five thousand (25,000) or more, in 'which 
an employment office is established, a Local Advisory Council to represent equally 
employers and employees to assist in the administration of the Employment Service 
of the said province. 

6. The party of the second part agrees to maintain a provincial clearance system 
in co-operation with the interprovincial clearance system established by the party of 
the first part. 

7. The parties hereto agree so to organize their respective Employment Services 
that they shall be able to render to employers and employees the services afforded by 
commercial employment agencies. 

8. The party of the second part shall not issue any new provincial licenses to 
commercial employment agencies within the province which charge any fee or com- 
mission either to employers or employees, and shall not transfer any license already 
issued, and shall forward on the first day of each quarter to the party of the first 
part a statement of commercial employment agency licenses issued by the party of 
the second part in force within the province, the names of the licensees, the business 
name of each agency, and the postal addresses of the premises in which such employ-" 
ment agencies are conducted. 

9. The party of the second part agrees to list the employment offices and clearing 
house of the province in the telephone directories under the name "Employment 
Service of Canada" as a part of the advertising of the Employment Service and 
without prejudice to the right of the party of the second part to also list the employ- 
ment offices and clearing house of the province under any other name that may seem 
desirable to the said party of the second part. 

10. The parties hereto agree to accept the terms and conditions of Order in Council 
3111 of December 17, 1918, passed under and by virtue of the provisions of the Em- 
ployment Offices Co-ordination Act as part of this agreement, and the same is hereby 
accepted as such. 

11. The party of the first part shall at all timse have the right to inspect by means 
of officers appointed by him for the purpose the operation of the employment offices of 
the party of the second part, and may withhold payments of moneys otherwise due and 
payable under this agreement if in his opinion the conditions of this agreement are not 
being fulfilled. 

12. The party of the second part agrees that all employment offices for which 
moneys are claimed under this agreement shall be kept open for business not less than 
four hours on Saturdays, and not less than eight hours on the other days of the week 
except Sundays and statutory holidays. 



76 



DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 



12 GEORGE V, A. 1922- 

■ 13. I'he party of the second part agrees that no charge shall be made to em- 
ployers or employees for services rendered by the Employment Service of the said 
party of the second part. 

14 Tlie party of the second part agrees to forward to the party of the first part 
within two months after the end of the present calendar year, a detailed report of 
the work of the Employment Service of the said party of the second part for suOh 
calendar year, and also to forward to the party of the first part any other reports on 
the work of the Employment Service of the party of the second part that may be issued 
from time to time. 

15. This contract shall have no force or effect until the same is approved by the 
Governor in Council. 

In witness whereof the said party of the first part has hereunto set his hand 
and the seal of the Department of Labour, at the City of 
this day of 19 . 

And in witness whereof the said party of the second part has hereunto set his hand 
and the seal of the said province, at the City of 
in the said province, this day of 19 

Special Arraxgemext With Municipalities 

'J'he Employment Offices Co-ordination Act was amended in 1920 by the addition 
of a clause which empowered the Minister of Labour to set aside from the moneys 
available under the Act an amount for the maintenance of employment oifiees other 
than those operated by Provincial Governments. It was provided, however, that no 
such ofiice should receive assistance unless the minister were satisfied that the Provin- 
cial Government concerned did not propose to enter into an agreement for the main- 
tenance of employment offices in that province in accordance "with the Act. An 
Order in Council (P.O. 2048, 1920) empowered the minister to sign a form of agree- 
ment drawn up for municipalities in provinces where no provincial en>ployment 
offices are operated. An agreement of this nature was made with the city of iloncton 
in August, 1920, whereby the Domiuion Government shares with the municipal 
government the expense of operating an employment office in that city. 

DiSBURSEMEXTS TO THE PROVINCES AND TO THE CiTT OF MONCTON 

For the fiscal year under review the disbursements to the provinces and to the 
municipality of Moncton for tlie maintenance of employment offices totalled 
$233,890.75. The following table shows the distribution of the payments among the 
different items of expense accepted as proper maintenance expenditures under the 
aicreement. 



- 


.\lberta 


British 
Columbia 


Manitoba 


Nova 
Scotia 


Ontario 


Quebec 


Saskat- 
chewan 


Muni- 
cipality of 
Moncton 


Total 




S cts. 

19.887 09 

2.315 31 

4,667 67 

48 66 

69 84 

1 91 

946 25 

1,448 65 

360 21 

259 82 

1,758 16 

8 49 


S ct«. 

21.740 64 

892 55 

3.902 34 

35 00 

99 91 

8 01 

1.863 36 

976 02 

786 81 

268 23 

491 98 


% cts. 

21,687 00 

485 06 

4,498 15 

146 00 

80 74 

42 46 

2,188 19 

983 26 

204 58 

299 50 

1,837 13 


S cts. 

•2,129 59 

9 76 

270 00 


S cts. 
65,486 21 

1,508 69 

10,703 83 

599 99 

397 05 

109 20 

2.762 13 

2.455 36 
759 47 

1.026 12 
692 91 


S cts. 

11.454 21 

275 56 

1.660 00 

14 28 

30 66 


S cts. 

15.687 97 

1.091 13 

4.566 25 

38 63 

90 71 


S cts. 
2,040 99 


$ cts. 
160,113 70 


Travelling expenses 


6.678 05 


252 50 
15 00 
9 94 


30.520 74 




897 56 


Light 


4 08 


782 93 




161 58 


Office supplies 


206 26 
105 07 
27 22 
60 85 
236 57 


i.OIa 74 

191 73 

69 

36 48 


593 62 
765 25 
334 39 
633 71 
6 75 


38 15 
40 91 
21 55 
26 70 
35 54 


9.613 70 




6.966 25 




2.494 92 


Postage and express 


2.611 41 
5.059 04 






8 49 




3,146 70 


201 17 








655 74 
591 42 




4.003 61 






50 83 


i.363 05 
2.039 96 




33 50 


2.038 80 


Elevator power 











2.039 96 


Totals 


31.772 06 


34,211 55 


32,653 24 


3,100 23 


89,903 97 


14,679 35 


25,055 57 


2,514 78 


233,890 75 







"Part of year. 



REPORT OF THE DKl'UTY MIKISTKR 77 

•SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 

List of Emtloyjiknt Offices 

The following is a list of employment offices and clearing houses operated under 

the Emplojiment Offices Co-ordination Act as at March 31, 1921: — 

Nova Scotia. — ■Amherst, Halifax, New Glasgow, Sydney. 

New Briinswicl-. — ^Moncton. 

Quebec. — Hull, Montreal, Quebec, iSherbrooke, Three Rivers. 

■Ontario. — Belleville, Brantford, Chatham, Cobalt, Fort William, Guelph, Hamilton, 
Kingston, Kitchener, London, Niag-ara Falls, North Bay, Oshawa, Ottawa (2), 
Pembroke, Peterboro, Port Arthur, Sarnia, 'Sault Ste. Marie, St. Catharines, 
St. Thomas, Sudlbury, Timimins, Toronto (2), Windsor. 

Manitoba. — Brandon, Dauphin, Portage la Prairie,. Winnipeg (6). 

Saskatchewan. — Estevan, Moose Jaw, North Battleford, Prince Albert, lEegina, Saska- 
toon, iSwift Current, Weyburn, Yorkton. 

Alberta. — ^Calgary, Drumheller, Edmonton, Lethbridge, Medicine Hat. 

British Cohtnifem.— ^Cranbrook, Fernie, Grand Forks, Kamloops, Kelowna, Nanaimo, 
Nelson, New Westminster, Prince Geoi-ge, Prince Rupert, Revels'toke, Vancouver 
(2), Vernon, Victoria. 

Provincial Clearing Houses. — ^Montreal, Quebec; Toronto, Ontario; Winnipeg, Mani- 
toba; Regina, 'Saskatchewan; Calgary, Alberta; Vancouver, British Columbia. 

Interprovincial Clearing Houses (Department of Labour). — Maritime Clearing House, 
Moncton; Eastern Clearing House, Ottawa; Western Clearing House, Winnipeg. 

Staff 

At the ibeginning of the fiscal year the total number of Dominion Government 
employees in the Employment iService was 93. The closing of the offices in tbe 
Maritime Provinces operated by the Department of Labour during the demobilization 
period involved the release of 26 persons. The staff in the Intel-provincial Clearing 
House of the Department of Labour at Moncton was reduced from seven to two, 
partly owing to the closing of the [Maritime offices, and partly to the greater centrali- 
zation of the statistical work in Ottawa — a policy which was promoted as far as 
possible during the year. As the staff of the service became more experienced and 
the organization was developed, it was found possible to carry on the work of the 
Branch Clearing House at Vancouver in the Western Clearing House at Winnipeg 
and accordingly, the Pacific Clearing House at Vancouver was closed on Novemiber 30 
and two of the staff were released. The removal of some of the statistical work of 
the Winnipeg Clearing House to Ottawa, made possible a reduction of two persons 
in the staff at Winnipeg. 

At the end of the fiscal year there were 307 persons employed in the Employment 
Service of Canada, of whom 58 were Dominion Government employees and 249 were 
employees of the various provincial services. Of the 58 Dominion Government 
employees, 51 were eauployed in the Department of Labour at Ottawa, 5 in the Inter- 
provincial Clearing House at Winnipeg and 2 at the Branch Clearing House at 
Moncton. In the provincial services the staff was distributed as follows: British 
Columbia, head office and clearing house, 3, local offices, 28; Alberta, head office and 
clearing house, 3, local offices, 23; Saskatchewan, head office and clearing house, 6, 
local offices, 22 ; Manitoba, head office and clearing house, 2, local offices. 33 ; Ontario, 
head office and clearing house, 3, local offices, 89; Quelbec, head office and clearing 
house, 2, local offices, 24; New Brunswick, local offices, 3; Nova iScotia, local offices, 8. 

The following indicates the staff in the employment offices in some of the larger 
cities: Montreal, 10; Quebec, 9; Ottawa, 0; Toronto, 33; Winnipeg, 27; Regina, 5; 
Oalgary, 10; Edmonton, 6; Vancouver, 13. 



78 



DEPARTMENT OF LADOUIi 



12 GEORGE V, A. 192? 
Statistical Report of Esiployment Offices 

With the close of the fiscal year 1920-21 there were TS employment offices 
operating under the terms of the Employment Offices Co-ordination Act, as com- 
pared with 95 offices at the close of the fiscal year 1919-20. 

During the fiscal year 1920-21 the number of applications for employment 
reported by the offices of the Employment Service was -145,280, of which 393.234 were 
from men and 52,046 from women. Applications for employment reported during 
the preceding year totalled 470,250. 

Vacancies notified by employers to the service during the year numbered 452,344, 
of which 387,415 were for men and 64,929 for women. This represents a slight increase 
when compared with the report for the previous year, when 449,042 positions were 
offered. 

The total placements made hy the offices during the year were 420,036. Of these, 
79,745, or 19 per cent, were placements in casual employment (employment of a dura- 
tion of one week or less is termed " casual"). Of the placements in regular employ- 
ment, 306,722 were of men and 33,569 of women. Placements reported during the 
preceding year (1919-20) totalled 328,937, representing an increase during the year 
under review of 91,099 placements. 

The following tables and chart show the applications, vacancies and placements 
reported by the offices of the Employment Service in the various provinces during 
the fiscal year. 



Applications for employment as reported by the offices of the Employment Service 
of Canada in the various provinces, during the year April 1, 1920, to March 26, 
1921. 



Provinces 


Men 


Women 


Total 


*Prinoe Edward Island 




4,970 

4,819 

23,872 

136,129 

55,590 

42,822 

57,797 

67,235 




361 

466 

2,514 

18,195 

9,803 

4,699 

9,415 

6,. 593 





*Nova Scotia 


5,331 




5,285 


Quebec 


26,386 




154,324 


Manitoba . . . .... 


65,393 




47,. 521 


Alberta 


67,212 


British Columbia . 


73,828 








393,234 


52.046 


445.280 



VAOA^X'^ES in regular employment as reported by the offices of the Employment Service 
of Canada in the various provinces during the year April 1, 1920, to March 26, 
1021. 



Provinces 


Men 


Women 


■ Total 


*Prince Edward Island 


110 

1,967 

5,648 

12,762 

131,201 

74,873 

.56,324 

57,510 

47,020 


10 
418 

488 

2,672 

25,190 

12,152 

7,288 

10,834 

5,877 


120 




2,385 


*N^ew Brunswick 


6,136 


Quebec 


15,434 




1.56,391 




87,025 




63,612 


Alberta 


68,344 


British Columbia 


. 52,897 




387,415 


64,929 


452,344 



* Offices closed permanently or for short period. 



HEPORT OF TUE DEPUTY MINISTER 



79 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 

Placements in regular and casual employment as reported by the offices of the Em- 
ployment Service of Canada, in the various provinces during the year April 1, 
1920, to March 26, 1921. 





Regular Placements 


Casual 
Placements 




Men 


Women 


Total 




95 

1,637 

4.841 

14,438 

100,062 

52,445 

40,886 

47,508 

44,810 


2 
166 
334 
1,442 
9,057 
6,681 
4,012 
7,273 
4,602 


97t 

1,803 

5,175 

15,880 

109,119 

59, 126 

44,898 

54,781 

49,412 







109 




222 




366 




17,856 




27,079 




6,962 


Alberta , 


14,605 


British ( 'olumbia 


12,546 








306,722 


33,569 


340,291 


79.745 



* Offices closed permanently or for short period. 

t Applicants placed were registered before April 1 , 1920. 




80 DEPARr:dEM' OF LABOUU 

12 george v, a. 1922 
Conferences 

Three conferences of particular interest to the Employment Service were held 
during the year under review. The first of these was the eighth annual meeting of 
the International Association of Public Employment Services (formerly the American 
Association of Public Employment Offices), held in Ottawa, September 20-22, 1920. 
This conference was attended by a large number of members, including delegates 
from most of the states and from all the Canadian provinces in which public employ- 
ment office systems are in operation. The first day was occupied with papers and 
informal discussion relating to unemployment and organization of employment. The 
topics for the second day were employment and education; the placement of tbe 
physically handicapped ; and the harvest labour problem, while the sessions on the 
final day of the conference were devoted to employment office administration and 
technique and the business meeting. The proceedings of this conference have been 
published by the Department of Labour of Canada. 

Immediately after this annual meeting of the International Association of Public 
Employment Services the second meeting of the Employment Service Council of 
Canada was held in Ottawa, and in March, 1921', a conference of western representa- 
tives of the Employment Service took place in Eegina. An account of these two 
conferences is given below. 

Employment Service Council of C.\nad.^. 

The regulations under the Employment Offices Co-ordination Act (P.C. 3111 of 
December 17, 1918) provided for the establishment of an advisory board to assist the 
minister in the administration of the Act and to recommend ways of preventing 
unemployment. This body, known as the Employment Service Council of Canada, is 
composed of the following members : — 

Nova Scotia. — W. M. McCoy, K.C., Secretary of Industries and Immigration, 
Halifax, representing the province of Nova Scotia. 

New Brunswick. — Celime Melanson, 236 High street, Moncton, representing the 
province of New Brunswick. 

Quebec. — Jos. Ainey, General Superintendent, Quebec Government Offices, Employ- 
ment Service of Canada, 10 St. James street, Montreal, representing the 
province of Quebec. 

Oniano. — H. C. Hudson, General Superintendent, Ontario Government Offices, 
Employment Service of Canada, 15 Queen's Park, Toronto, representing the 
province of Ontario. 

Maniiola. — J. A. Bowman, General Superintendent, Manitoba Government 
Offices, Employment Service of Canada, 439 Main street, Winnipeg, representing 
the province of Manitoba. 

Sasl-afchevan. — Thos. M. Molloy, Commissioner, Bureau of Labour and Indus- 
tries, Eegina, representing the province of Saskatchewan. 

Alhrria. — J. W. Mitchell, General Superintendent, Saskatchewan Government 
Offices, Employment Service of Canada, Calgary, representing the province of 
Alberta. 

British Columhia. — J. D. McNiven, Deputy Minister of Labour, Victoria, 
representing the province of British Columbia. 

Canadian Manufacturers Association. — G. E. Carpenter, Western Secretary, Canadian 
Manufacturers' Association, Winnipeg; E. Blake Eobertson, Eastern Secretary, 
Canadian Manufacturers' Association, Ottawa, representing the Canadian Manu- 
facturers' Association. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY .\IINISTER 81 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 

Association of Canadian Building and Construction Industries. — J. P. Anglin, Presi- 
dent, Association of Canadian Building and Construction Industries, Montreal, 
roprosonting the Association of Canadian Building and Construction Industries. 

Trades and Labour Congress of Canada. — Arthur Martcl, Vice-President, Trades 
and Labour Congress of Canada, Montreal; E. W. A. O'Dell, General Organizer, 
Boot and Slice Workers' Union, TTamilton, representing the Trades and Labour 
Congress of Canada. 

Railway Association of Canada. — C. P. Kiddell, Secretary, the Railway Association 
of Canada, ^Montreal, representing the Eailway Association of Canada. 

Ganodian Railway Brotherhoods. — S. N. Berry, Vice-President, Order of Rail- 
way Conductors, 53 Beatrice street, Toronto, representing the Canadian Railway 
Brotherhoods. 

Canadian Lumbermen's Association. — Frank Hawkins, Secretai-y, Canadian 
Lumlicrmon's Association, Fraser Building, Ottawa, representing the Canadian 
Lurubernien's Association. 

Canadian Council of Agriculture. — E. McKenzie, Vice-President, Canadian Council 
of Agriculture, 613 Boyd Building, Winnipeg; AV. C. Good. Canadian Council 
of Agriculture, Paris, Out., representing the Canadian Council of Agriculture. 

Department of Labour, Ottawa. — Mrs. Jean S. Robson, Canadian Council of Immi- 
gration of Women for Household Service, Immigration Department, Ottawa ; 
Miss Helen R. Y. Reid, Canadian Patriotic Fund, Montreal ; Bryce M. S tewart. 
Director of Employment Sei-vice, Department of Labour, Ottawa, repre- 
senting the Department of Labour. ' 

Great War Veterans' Association. — C. G. MacNeil, Dominion Secretary-Treasurer, 
Gi-eat War Veterans' Association, Ottawa, representing the Great War Veterans" 
Association. 

Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment. — T. A. Stevenson, Information and 
Service Branch, Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment, Ottawa. 

This council met for the first time in May, 1919. A second meeting was held in 
Ottawa, on September 23-24, 1920, at which the progress made during the preceding 
year was reviewed and plans for developing the work of the Employment Service and 
preventing unemployment were fully discussed. Committees were appointed by the 
council to consider and report on unemployment, employment office administration 
and technique and specialized services. The reports of these committees were 
adopted with slight modifications by the council. An important amendment to the 
constitution provided for an executive committee with power to enter into any 
negotiations necessary to carry out the wishes of the Eniployraent Service Council as 
expressed in the resolutions and to present to the Minister of Labour, Provincial 
Governments or others concerned, the resolutions of the council. This executive 
committee is authorized to give consideration to any question that may arise between 
sessions of the council, and is required to submit its findings to the members for 
approval. 

The following are the recommendations brought in by the various committees and 
adopted by the council for the minister's consideration : — 

COMMITTEE ON ADMINISTRATION AND TECHNIQUE 

Recommendation 1. — The committee is unanimously in favour of some form of 
advisory council or committee for each employment office and for each provincial 
Emp^oyment Service and strongly recommends that each province take immediate 

37 — 6 



82 DEPAllTMENT OF LABOUR 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

action toward the fonnation of such councils. Where special legislation is 
necessary the committee recommends that the Minister of Labour be asked to 
communicate direct with the Provincial Governments concerned. 

Recommendation 2. — (a) The committee realizes the importance of having the lowest 
possible transportation rates for persons securing employment through the Employ- 
ment Service and recommends that the Director of the Employment Service shall 
endeavour to have the 24 cent rate maintained. 

(6) In order to facilitate the transfer of workers to employment, the com- 
mittea recommends that each province provide a fund out of which fares may be 
advanced to workers sent to more or less distant points on account of the 
impossibility of placing them locally. The regulations covering such advances 
which should not be given any publicity whatsoever — should be modelled after 
those of the British system of employment ofices. 

Recommendation S. — The committee is pleased to learn that the eiforts of the Depart- 
ment of Labour with regard to the issuing of an Employment Service bulletin ,are 
meeting with success and the committee looks forward with interest to the first 
rumber. The committee is convinced that such a bulletin will provide a 
valuable means of promoting the objects of the Employment Service 

Rpcommendation U- — The committee fully appreciates the difficulties under which 
the Department of Labour has been working with reference to job analysis, and 
is pleased to learn that notwithstanding these difficulties considerable progress 
has been made towards the publication of a memorandum on job analysis. The 
members of this committee hope that a complete report on this subject will be 
issued as soon as possible realizing that it will be of decided benefit to the 
Employment Service as a whole. 

Recommendation 5. — With regard to the policy of the Employment iService towards 
the question of advertising and publicity the committee is of the opinion that: — 
(a) The use of detailed classified newspaper advertising is essential to the 
successful operation of employment offices. The extent of this advertising should 
be determined by the Employment Service of each province. Such advertising 
should be systematic and wherever possible a daily advertisement in the same 
relative position should be used to display the most attractive orders and appli- 
cations listed in the office. 

(&) Local superintendents should confer frequently with such bodies as 
Boards of Trade, Chambers of Commerce, Business Women's Clubs, Kotary, 
Kiwanis and Commercial Clubs, Eetail Merchants' and Builders' Associations, 
Trades and Labour Councils, and other organizations with the idea of laying 
before these bodies the advantages to be obtained from the Employment Service 
as related to their business or private interests. 

(c) That a poster should be prepared to direct persons seeking employment 
and employers seeking workers to the various government employment offices. 
Such posters should be displayed in railway stations, post offices and other public 
places. 

(d) That general and local sui>erintendents should seize every opportunity to 
have news items concerning the Service inserted in local newspapers. 

(e) Standard Sign.- — After careful consideration of the various designs for 
a standard sign, the committee recommends the adoption of the design used by the 



liEl'OKT OF THE DErVTY MIMSTEIi 83 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 

province of Manitoba, consisting of an oval with the word " Eniiiloyniont Service 
of Canada " around the outside, Icavinp: to the province directly concerned the 
wording to bo used in the bar running from end to end of the oval. 

Recommendation 6. — The committee has learned with satisfaction that several 
of the provinces have taken steps since the last meeting of the Employment Ser- 
vice Council to close all private employment agencies within their boundaries 
and it is strongly recommended that the provinces in which private agencies 
still exist should follow their example as soon as practicable. 

Recommendation 7. — (As this recommendation relates to alterations in forms and is 
therefore not of general interest it has been omitted.) 

Recommendation 8. — The committee recommends that provincial superintendents be 
called together at least once a year in addition to the meeting of the Employment 
Service Council to consider numerous questions of common interest for which 
time is not available at the meeting of the Employment Service Council. 

COMMITTEE ON SPECIALIZED SERVICE 

Recommendation 1. — The committee recommends that the survey now being carried 
on under the direction of Mr. Wyatt at Winnipeg be continued, and that all 
information gained be made available to the other provinces with the view that 
these provinces may proceed with the development of juvenile departments upon 
a sound and tested basis. 

Recommendation 2. — With regard to the placement of handicapped workers, the 
committee reports that the general principle that such workers require special 
service seems to have been justified by the experience of public employment 
offices now working with handicapped workers in special divisions. Special 
knowledge of occupational opportunities is necessary in connection with the 
placing of handicapped workers, and the needs of the employer as well as of the 
applicant must be carefully considered. A careful record of the progress of 
those applicants placed should be kept, preferably through a personal follow-up 
system. 

The committee reaffirms the recommendation made by the Employment 
Service Council at its 1919' meeting that where necessary special departments 
be created for handicapped workers. 

The committee further recommends the co-operation of the Employment 
Service of Canada with the special effort being made this winter by the Depart- 
ment of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment in the placing of vocationally trained 
men and that where necessary special placement officers with overseas experience 
should be attached to the offices of the Employment Service of 'Canada in the 
larger industrial centres for the express purpose of specializing in the employ- 
ment needs of disabled and handicapped soldiers. 

Recommendation S. — The committee would strongly urge the establishment of special 
divisions for women in all employment offices throughout the Employment Service 
and that separate entrances to such divisions be provided where possible. 

The committee further recommends that all records of placements and 
replacements of women workers, especially those from overseas, be made avail- 
able to the superintendent of the local hostel or such other authority as may seem 
entitled thereto. 

Recommendation U. — This committee is of the opinion that adequate provision should 
be made by the Governments of the various provinces for the placing of teachers 
and other professional workers in employment so that they may not have to 
depend on fee-charging agencies for this service. The committee, therefore, 
37— 6 i 



84 DEPARTilEM- OF LABOUR 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

recommends that the Minister of Labour be requested to take up with the various 
provincial Governments, the establishment of a uniform and co-ordinated system 
of business and professional placement offices in the Employment Service at the 
earliest possible date. 

Becommendation 5. — The committee strongly recommends that recruiting of workers 
from any country for employment in Canada should be permitted only after 
consultation with employers and workers through the Employment Service. 

Recommendation 6. — -That this council approve of an intensive study of the harvest 
labour problem in Western Canada. 

COMMITTEE ON UNEMPLOYMENT 

Recommendation 1. — Whereas the Governments of Canada and of the United 
Kingdom have agreed that employers making application for labour from the 
United Kingdom shall be required to first make application to the Employment 
Service of Canada and shall import such labour if necessary only through the 
agency of the Employment Service and the Department of Immigration, and 

Whereas complaints continue to be received that workers recruited in the 
United Kingdom frequently find on arriving in Canada that employment condi- 
tions have been misrepresented ; 

Now therefore be it resolved that this council approves the agreement 
entered into by the said Governments and urges that such agreement be made 
more effective by providing that persons shall be permitted to recruit labour 
from the United Kingdom for employment in Canada only under the super- 
vision of the British Ministry of Labour. 

Recommendation 2. — Resolved that the Employment Service of Canada should 
endeavour to extend among employers and employees such methods as will result 
in stabilizing employment conditions; it is suggested that in the negotiations 
of trade agreements the principle of restriction of overtime and reduction of 
Lours in slack periods rather than the reduction of permanent working forces, 
as already agreed upon by many employers and labour organizations, be given 
full consideration, and that the members of this council representing various 
organizations of employers and workmen be requested to bring this resolution to 
the attention of their respective bodies and 'to report the views of such organiza- 
tions to the secretary of the council. 

Recommendation 3. — Whereas in view of the report of the Royal Commission on 
Industrial Relations, and the recommendation of the National Industrial Con- 
ference and the fact that the principle of unemployment insurance has been 
endoi-sed by the Trades and Labour Congress of Canada, the Great War 
Veterans' Association and the International Labour Conference at Washington, 
and 

Whereas this council considers that some form of unemployment insurance 
would greatly reduce distress and unrest due to unemployment and the fear of 
unemployment; 

Now therefore be it resolved that this council request that a board bo 
appointed forthwith as recommended by the National Industrial Conference 
with instructions to submit a report to the next National Industrial Conference, 
indicating if in their view immediate legislative action should be instituted. 

Recommendation 4.— Whereas unemployment consequent upon seasonal and cyclical 
fluctuations in the demand for labour can be greatly reduced by the policy of 
stimulating the demand for labour in bad times through the postponement of 
Government contracts of a non-urgent character until it is necessary to promote 
a demand for labour owing to slackening of private employment; 



REPORT OF TaT> DEPUTY MINISTER 85 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 

And whereas this policy was endorsed by the Joint Industrial Conference 
of the United Kingdom and by the International Labour Conference at Wash- 
ington ; 

And whereas this council at its last meeting resolved "that in the approval 
and execution of public works and in the purchase of Government supplies 
regard shall be had so far as reasonably practicable to the general state and 
prospects of the labour market to the end that the total volume of employment 
of the country may be kept as c<mstant as possible" ; 

Now therefore be it resolved that the Employment Service of Canada, 
through the Employment Service of the Department of Labour, and through 
the provincial employment services, shall with the least possible delay bring 
this policy to the attention of all Government authorities controlling any con- 
siderable amount of puWie expenditure, and shall in co-operation with such 
departments, arrange to have constantly at hand information as to available 
and projected Government expenditure with the view to planning such expendi- 
ture in accordance with the state of the labour market; that the secretary shall 
send copies of this resolution to the departments concerned, and that the various 
provincial Employment Services shall forward progress reports to the secretary 
of this council. 

The action taken on the above recommendations is referred to below under 
various subject headings. 

The first meeting of the executive committee of the Employment Service Council 
was held on December 27-29, for the purpose of discussing means for relieving the 
unemployment situation existing in Canada at that time. Eesolutions adopted by 
the Employment Service Council in September were presented to the minister by the 
executive and conferences were arranged with representatives of the Department 
of Public "Works, the Department of Immigration and the Purchasing Commission 
with a view to securing their co-operation in the regularization of employment and 
the alleviation of existing conditions. A suggested statement of duties for provin- 
cial and local employment service councils was prepared, and resolutions relating to 
the abolition of private employment agencies, methods of stabilizing employment and 
the employment of disabled ex-service men were passed at the meetng. A general 
employment policy was also drafted for submission to the minister. 

Conference of Western Representatives 

A conference of western representatives of the Employment Service of Canada 
was held for the first time in Calgary on March 8-10, 1920. At this conference a 
number of questions were discussed in the light of the experience gained during the 
first year's operation of the Employment Offices Co-ordination Act, and at its close 
it was decided that it would be helpful for the western representatives to meet together 
each year to consider the problems peculiarly afiecting the interests of the western 
provinces. A second annual conference was accordingly held in Eegina, March 8 
and 9, 1921. The province of British Columbia was represented at this conference 
by three members, Alberta by six, Saskatchewan by twelve, and Manitoba by two. 
The Director of the Employment Service of Canada and the Dominion Superinten- 
dent of Western Ofilces were present. The sessions during the first day were largely 
devoted to various phases of employment office administration. The topics discussed 
included methods of interviewing applicants, of acknowledging orders and of record 
keeping and the interprovincial transfer of labour in its relation to zone boundaries. 
The following day a joint conference with representatives of the farmers' organizations 
from the three Prairie Provinces was arranged at which farm labour problems in 
general and in particular the distribution of labour and the standardization of wage= 
were discussed. 



86 DEPARTMEM' OF LABOUR 



Employment Statistics 



12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 



Statistics covering tlie field of employment are compiled under authority of the 
section of the Employment OiEces Co-ordination Act which empowers the Minister 
of Labour "to compile and distribute information received from employment offices 
and from other sources regarding prevailing conditions of employment." For this 
purpose five principal sources of information are used : weekly reports from employers, 
daily reports from employment offices, trade union reports, reports on civic employ- 
ment, reports on building permits. 

Employer's Payrolls. — A valuable index to the state of employment in general is 
a statement of the total number of employees reported by employers, as compared with 
the total number for identical employers at a given date previous. The Employment 
Service has established a system of weekly reports on payrolls from over 5,000 
employers of labour in all lines except agriculture. By this means it is possible to 
estimate fairly accurately at a given date how many workers have been released from 
employment, or how many have been added to the active industrial forces of the 
country. 

Reports of Employment Offices. — ^Daily reports from the offices of the Employment 
Service throughout Canada show the number of orders for workers received, the 
number of applications from workers received and the number of placements made. 
Not only do these statistics afford a check on the information derived from payroll 
reports, but they also show to what extent an unemployment situation is relieved 
through the work of the offices, or conversely how far the supply of available labour 
in the country falls short of the employers' demands. They make possible a com- 
parison of the work done under the peculiar geographical and climatic conditions of 
Canada with that of similar services in other countries, and also the interpretation 
and control of the larger movements of labour between different geographical sections 
of the Dominion. 

Unemployment Reports from Trade Unions. — Reports from ti-ade .unions through- 
out the country show the number of members in each union and the number of 
members out of work or working short time, affording a good index to the state of 
employment in the skilled trades more particularly. These reports are received 
monthly from approximately 1,500 labour organizations with a total membership of 
200,000. To prevent duplication, unions are asked to omit from reports members who 
are employed in work other than their own trades, members who have moved out of the 
district, and members idle because of sickness, strike or lockout. 

Civic Employment. — Statements of payrolls of temporary employees of depart- 
ments and commissions in the fifteen largest Canadian cities, distributed by provinces, 
are received monthly. Included in these reports are the amount of wages paid. These 
statistics are valuable as an index to the volume of civic employment in the country 
and they assist in its adjustment to seasonal variations in private employment. 

Building Permits. — Statistics on the total value of building permits issued in the 
thirty-five largest Canadian cities reported monthly, afford an index to the amount 
of employment existing in the building trades and to some extent in allied metal and 
woodworking trades. 

The information represented by these various statistics has often been of value 
in estimating the employment situation in any locality before the release of Govern- 
ment contracts. It has also been of service in immigration matters, especially in 
connection with requests from employers for the admission of labour from other 
countries. In this connection the reports from employers, indicating expansion or 
contraction in the industry in question, with the related information from trade unions 
and from employment offices as to the demand for workers of the class called for and 
the supply of such workers, afford a basis for decision as to admission or exclusion. 



REPORT- OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 87 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 

of imrnigriiut workers. In a more general way, there is the recognized utility of a 
serviceable fund of information as to seasonal fluctuations in the different industries, 
often stressed by climatic factors, enabling the service to deal more efFectively with 
its problems. Such information makes it possible to formulate methods of transfer- 
ring workers from industries in seasonal decline to tliose in the period of expansion, 
enabling employers to maintain a maximum production and reducing the difficult 
problems, of seasonal unemployment. Finally the usefulness of these statistics in 
connection witli any system of unemployment insurance is obvious. In due course 
much of this information will be available at frequent intervals through an employ- 
ment bulletin. 

Information on Unemployment and the Organization of the Labour Market.- — 
Additional non-statistical information has been collected in considerable volume by 
the Employment Service, chiefly on measures for preventing or alleviating unemploy- 
ment, such as short time instead of reduction in stafE during slack periods, the 
reservation of Government works for periods of depression, the concentration of 
Government purchasing in times of seasonal slackness, the placement of handicapped 
workers, unemployment insurance, etc. Memoranda based on this data have been dis- 
tributed from the Employment Service headquarters at Ottawa to the officers of the 
service to assist them to keep in touch with developments along various lines of 
employment work both in Canada and in other countries. These memoranda are 
also available to other persons interested in employment problems. In pursuance of 
the resolution of the National Industrial Conference that an inquiry into the question 
of unemployment insurance should be made, the Employment Service collected infor- 
mation on this subject and compiled a memorandum summarizing the available data 
which has been distributed to representative employers and trade unions. 

Labour Mobility 

The clearance work of the Employment Service was in general carried on during 
the year along the lines developed during the preceding year. Each local office reports 
daily to the clearing house of the province positions unfilled and impossible to fill 
locally, and ai>plicants unplaced and willing to leave the locality so that an unsatis- 
fied demand for labour in one ipart of the province may be related to unemployed 
workers in another. When the provincial clearance officer is unable to secure the 
workers required in any case within the province, he marks the item for inter- 
provincial circulation. The interprovineial clearing house lists such items from all 
the provinces in its jurisdiction in an interprovineial clearance bulletin so that 
superintendents are advised if the local demands for labour or employment can be 
satisfied in nearby provinces. They are authorized to communicate directly with the 
other superintendents concerned and reports on transfers effected are made to the 
two provincial clearing houses interested and to the interprovineial clearing house of 
the district. Ottawa headquarters also issues a Dominion clearance bulletin which 
circulates among all the offices of the country, applications for employment and orders 
for lahour that appear to be especially difficult of satisfaction, involving perhaps 
transfers 'between east and west and possibly necessitating effort to secure workers 
from other countries. The items in this bulletin are mainly those reported by the 
interprovineial clearing houses as involving special difficulties and not likely to be 
satisfied by offices in their territory. The province of Ontario has been divided 
with a view to a more efficient clearance into five zones, clearance officers being placed 
in the principal office of each zone. Each clearance officer is expected to keep in daily 
communication with all the offices in his division in order to fill all orders or place 
all applicants from, within the zone wherever possible. In the case of an order which 
a trial or the clearance officer's knowledge indicates cannot be filled wdthin the zone, 
the particulars are communicated to the provincial clearing house. In handling inter- 



88 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

zone transfers, local superintendents communicate direct with each other and report 
the transactions to the zone clearance officer after it is completed. 

In November, 1920, a new method of handling clearance items was adopted in 
the Dominion and Interprovincial clearing houses. Formerly the bulletins of thesi- 
clearing houses were issued in sheet form and w^ere cumulative, new items heing added 
to those already on the bulletin, and the whole bulletin being sent out at intervals of 
a week. Under the new system each " live " clearance item on the bulletin was 
printed on a separate postcard and forwarded in this form to all local offices and 
clearing houses concerned. At the same time these offices were instructed that in 
future only new applications or orders, revisions or cancellations, would be sent out 
and that these would be circulated in card form immediately they were received in 
the clearing houses. The clerical work in the clearing houses in connection with 
the preparation of these bulletins is considerably lessened under the new system and 
it is found that for purposes of reference the items in card form are more readil.y 
available " Live " orders and applications can be filed numerically by provinces 
while in the same way orders and applications no longer active may be retained on 
file separately for reference when necessary. As all cards are dated it is easily ascer- 
tainaJble how long any item has been in circulation. In addition under the new 
system when the cards are received in the local offices they can be filed in each inter- 
viewer's card index tray of "live" orders. 

The provincial clearing house at Toronto had instituted a similar system for 
dealing with provincial items several weeks before its adoption in the Dominion and 
Interprovincial clearing houses, and the remaining provinces were urged to install 
this method for provincial clearance at as early a date as possible. The new system 
was in operation before long in all provincial clearing houses with the exception of 
that of Quebec, and as a result much less time is now required for the clearance 
process. 

Further arrangements with regard to the circulation of Dominion clearance 
orders and applications have been adopted'. When any difficulty or delay is experi- 
enced in securing applicants to fill orders, a circular is forwarded to the trade union 
or unions which have in their membership the special class of workers required. The 
circular is in postcard form and is so worded that neither the precise locality of the 
work described nor the name of the firm requiring workers appears. The secretary 
of the union is informed that unemployed members available for the employment 
described should apply at the local office of the service referring to the order number 
quoted on the card. Similarly, when no vacancy is available for specially skilled 
applicants, cards describing the qualifications of such applicants are circulated among 
a selected list of employers. 

It has been found in practice that the provincial boundaries are in many instances 
not the natural lines for dividing the country into convenient districts for employ- 
mexit service work. In the case of Hull and Ottawa, for instance. Port Arthur and 
Winnipeg, Golden, B.C., and Calgary, the system of provincial clearance described 
above would sometimes involve long-distance transfers of labour within a province 
when the labour might be closer in another province. In most cases, however, the 
su])erintendents of the offices concerned have worked out arrangements to overcome 
this difficulty. 

During the year 1&19-20 an arrangement was put into effect with regard to the 
adimission of workers from Great Britain to fill vacancies which cannot be filled in 
Canada. This plan involves close co-operation between the Immigration Department 
and the Employment Service and between the Employment Service of Canada and 
the British employment exchanges. A procedure has been adopted which obviates 
delay as far as possible and which at the same time insures that no request shall 
be taken into consideration before the authorities have had an opportunity of 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MlMnTEIi 89 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 

dccifling whether provailiiiH' conditions are such as to warrant the introduction of 
the required labour. A form issued by the Enrploymont Service is available to 
employers wishing to Ibring workers into Canada. When particulars as to the condi- 
tions of employment offered have been entered upon this form, it is returned to the 
officer in charge of the nearest employment ofBce, who satisfies himself as to the 
bona fides and the apparent alsility of the employer to fulfill the offered terms and 
endorses the form to that effect. The endorsed form is then transmitted to the 
Director of the Employment 'Service at Ottawa for approval. Before such approval 
is granted, however, effort is made to secure the required help in Canada and it is 
only when such efforts have proved unsuccessful that the employer's application to 
import workers is approved. When an application is approved, a duplicate copy of 
the form is forwarded to the Oversea Employment Committee in Great Britain in 
order that endeavours may ibe made to fill the vacancies through the British system 
of employment exchanges. It has also been arranged with the Oversea Employment 
Branch of the British Ministry of Labour that the Employment Service shall receive 
from this branch a monthly statement of persons in the United Kingdom applying for 
employment overseas, showing the occupation and qualifications of each applicant. 
Copies of these statements are furnished to all the local offices of the Employment 
Service of Canada in order that they may he referred to when an order is received 
from an employer which cannot be filled by workers in Canada at the time. 

A special transportation rate for persons being sent to employment at a distance 
was granted in 1919 by tlie following railways: Canadian National 'Railways, Cana- 
dian Pacific Railway, Dominion Atlantic Railway, Michigan Central Railway, Quebec 
Central Railway, Temiskaming and Northern Ontario Railway, Waibash Railroad, 
Kettle Valley Railroad, and Pacific Great Eastern Railway. Under this transporta- 
tion arrangement a reduction from the regular rate was granted on all trips of 116 
miles or more, a flat fare of $4 being charged on all trips of from 116 to 400 miles, 
and a one-cent-a-mile rate on all trips of more tlian 400 miles: This rate has since 
been twice revised and since September, 1920, the rate has been 2-7 cents per milo 
with a mininium fare of $4, tickets issued at this rate to be second-class. The rate 
applies only in cases of bona fide placements through the Employment Service and 
pre-supposes the existence of a vifell-organized system of provincial and interprovin- 
cial clearance to insure that persons will not be despatched long distances when 
suitable employment is available near at hand. 

The number of special rate certificates issued by offices of the Service during 
the fiscal year 1920-21 was 50,860 of which 31,759 were issued to points in the same 
province as the dispatching offices and 19,101 to points in other provinces. The 
following tables give the figures in detail :-^ 

PROVIXCTAI. TliAXSFERS 

British Columbia 5.661 

Alberta 5,244 

Sasliatchewan 3,013 

Manitoba 3,632 

Ontario 13,679 

Quebec 528 

New Brunswick 1 

Nova Scoita 1 

Prince Edward Island 



Total 31.759 



90 



DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 



12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 



INTERPHO\ IXCUL TRANSFERS 



Issuing Province 


B.C. 


Alta. 


Sask. 


Man. 


Ont. 


Que. 


N.B. 


N.S. 


P.E.I. 


Totals. 






2,523 


993 
576 


44 

5 

1,926 

"283 
2 












3,560 


Alberta 


2,151 
447 

78 
32 












2,732 




424 

236 

2 


346 
3,731 

■■3'362 










3,143 




1,552 

91 

7 


2 
265 








5,599 










673 










3,371 


N B 
















N.S.. 














23 






23 


P E I 




' siiso 




















2. 70S 


3,219 


2,260 


7,439 


267 


23 






19,101 



The importance of this special rate plan is reducing unemployment and increasing 
production is fully realized by the Employment Service Council of Canada and at 
the second annual conference of the council a report of the committee on administra- 
tion and technique was adopted which recommended a lowering of the rate. There 
have been several conferences with the railways in the matter but as yet without 
success. The committee recommended further that in order to facilitate the transfer 
of workers to employment, each province should provide a fund out of which fares 
could be advanced to workers sent to more or less distant points on account of the 
impossibility of placing them locally. A clause had previously been included in the 
agreement between the Provincial and Dominion Goveimments providing that unre- 
funded advances for transportation issued to persons directed to employment at a 
distance secured through the Employment Service should be included among the 
expenditures deemed properly made under the Act. 

An amendment of the Ontario Trades and Labour Branch Act introduced at 
the last session of the Provincial Legislature contained a clause empowering the 
Lieutenant Governor in Council to make regulations "for advancing the travelling 
expenses of persons travelling to their place of employment who have procured such 
employment through the Ontario Government Employment Bureaux, and the condi- 
tions under which such advances for travelling expenses may be made." This clause, 
however, was amended and in its final form contained the proviso that such advances 
may be made only when the employer agrees to repay tlie office. 



FARM LABOUR 

The problem of securing labour for employment on farms continued to occupy 
much of the attention of the Employment Service. In accordance with suggestions 
made at the Conference of Western Eepresentatives of the Employment Service at 
Calgary in March, 1920, temporary employment offices were opened at Bowsman and 
Barrow's Junction in Manitoba, and Big River and Hudson Bay Junction in Saskat- 
3hewan, for the purpose of diverting the workers leaving the mines and lumber camp:> 
directly to employment on farms in order that the demand for help for the spring 
seeding might be met. 

A plan similar to that carried out the previous year was adopted for securing an 
adequate supply of harvest help for the western provinces. The requirements of 
Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta were estimated at an early date and commmii- 
cated to headquarters of the Employment Service at Ottawa, where a conference was 
held with the passenger traffic managers of the two transcontinental railway systems 
and plans were made for the annual harvest excursions. At Winnipeg representatives 
.of the three Provincial Employment Services and of the Western Clearing House ar- 
.ranged for the distribution of the harvest excurs.'onists. The total demand for work- 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MIJ^ISTER 91 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 

ers registered with the Employment Service in August was 60,000 and of this num- 
ber about one-half was required for the western harvest. The number of workers 
placed during the month was 50,000 and the remaining 10,000 were secured early in 
September. The number of persons dispatched from the east on the harvest excur- 
sions was 28,228. A few thousand harvest workers were also secured for the Prairie 
Provinces in the coast cities of British Columbia. 

In Ontario, under the direction of the Women's Farm Section of the Toronto 
office, eighteen camps for fruit-pickers were opened in the districts of Niagara, 
Grimsby and Clarkson, at which employment for .300 women was secured. 

All the employment offices which act as distributing centres for farm labour 
have endeavoured to provide special facilities for handling this work. The Toronto 
office has a Farm Labour Section, while in Winnipeg a separate office deals solely with 
this class of worker. In other offices such as those in Calgary and Edmonton, special 
interviewers for farm labour are maintained, and rooms have been made available 
for the use of farmers wishing to interview prospective help. 

The harvest labour problem was discussed at some length at the second annual 
conference of the Employment Service Council of Canada, and a resolution was 
passed approving an intenrsive study of the harvest problem in Western Canada. Farm 
labour problems were also considered in detail at the second annual meeting of 
Western Eepresentatives of the Employment Service, at which representatives of the 
farmers' organizations in the three Prairie Provinces were invited to attend. It was 
unanimously recommended at this conference that the farmers' organizations "urge 
their membership to a more general use of the Employment Service, where offices are 
established, pointing out the evils of picking up help indiscriminately or seeking to 
secure it from other sources at varying wages," and further that "the Employment 
Service in co-operation with the various farmers' organizations put on a campaign 
urging farmers to engage help early as an insurance against loss through labour 
ehortage." 

PL.4CEMENT IN PROFESSIONAL AND BUSINESS OCCUPATIONS 

During the demobilization period, the Information and Service Branch of the 
Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment established special professional and 
business sections in the larger cities, and officers of the Employment Service co- 
operated by notifying these sections of suitable openings and by referring to them 
returned soldiers with professional or business training. A special officer was appointed 
at headquarters in Ottawa to organize professional and business work in the Employ- 
ment Service and to have charge of the professional and business clearance during the 
period of demobilization. An office for both soldier and civilian applicants of the 
professional and business classes, in which two representatives of the Department of 
Soldiers' Civil Ee-establishment were stationed, was maintained in the Western Clear- 
ing House at Winnipeg. By the end of June, 1920, the Department of Soldiers' 
Civil Ee-establishment had discontinued its employment work for returned soldiers 
and the office of the Western Clearing House of the Employment Service was also 
closed. The establishment of a professional and business section in the Employment 
Service and the operation of business and professional offices by the provinces has 
been urged by the Emiployment Service Council of Canada and negotiations to this end 
have been carried on with the various Provincial Governments. As a result of these 
negotiations in some of the larger cities all professional and business work has been 
placed in charge of a special officer and particular attention has been given to this 
phase of employment work. The question of establishing a uniform and co-ordinated 
system of business and professional placement offices in the Employment Service was 



92 DEPAltrilE^T OF LABOUR 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

discussed at the meeting of the Executive Committee of the Employment Service 
■ Council in December, and the Minister of Labour was requested to urge upon Provin- 
cial Governments the establishment of divisions for professional and business workers 
in cities where the volume of business of that class warranted such a step. When the 
agreement for the fiscal year 1921-22 was drawn up, a clause to this effect was inserted 
accordingly. Several of the universities in Canada have been considering the estab- 
lishment of appointment bureaus and plans for the co-operation of the Employment 
Service with such bureaus are being worked out. 

PLACEMENT OF THE HANDICAPPED 

To meet the problem of placing disabled ex-service men, a section was 
organized in the Information and Service Branch of the Department of Soldiers' 
Civil Re-establishment. Special employment offices for the handicapped, under the 
supervision of this section, were opened in a number of cities, and in other 
cases through an arrangement with the Employment Service of Canada, 
representatives of the Information and Service Branch were stationed in the employ- 
ment offices to deal with all cases of returned soldier applicants, including the dis- 
abled. Officers of the Employment Service co-operated in this work by notifying the 
offices for the handicapped of openings suitable for such workers, and by referring 
disabled soldiers to these offices. When the Information and Service Branch was de- 
mobilized in the summer of 1920 their offices for the handicapped were discontinued. 
The Employment Service, however, took over this work in so far as possible and 
arrangements were made for co-operation between the vocational branch of the Depart- 
ment of Soldiers' Civil Ke-establishment and the Employment Service in the 
placing of handicapped men graduating from training courses given by the vocational 
branch. 

The establishment of a handicap division in the Employment Service was urged 
by the Employment Service Council of Canada at its first meeting, and at the second 
meeting the report of a committee on special services reaffirmed the recommendation 
that where necessary special departments should be created for handicapped workers. 
The committee further recommended the co-operation of the Employment Service with 
any special efforts made during the winter by the Department of Soldiers' Civil Ee- 
establishment in the placing of vocationally trained men. In accordance with this 
recommendation further arrangements were made with the vocational branch. At the 
meeting of the executive committee of the Employment Service Council held in De- 
cember, the subject of employment for handicapped workers was discussed, and as in 
the case of professional and business workers, the minister was requested to urge upon 
the Provincial Governments the establishment of divisions for handicapped workers in 
cities where the volume of business of that class warranted such a step. A clause to 
this effect has accordingly been inserted in the agreement with the provinces for the 
fiscal year 1921-22. A resolution to the effect that, when possible, disabled returned 
soldiers should be given preference in connection with the vacancies in the Civil Ser- 
vice notified to the Employment Service by the Civil Service Commission was also 
passed by the executive. In the arrangements between the Civil Service Commission 
and the Employment Service for securing some of the temporary help required by the 
Dominion Government through the Employment Service, outlined on another page, 
this policy is being observed. 

PLACEMENT OF WOMEN 

Special divisions for the placement of women workers have been established in 
connection with many of the larger offices of the service. The action of the Provincial 



REl'ORr OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 93 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 

Governments in setting up these divisions is in line with the recommendation of the 
Employment Service Council of Canada at its second annual meeting, when the estab- 
lishment of women's divisions in all the offices of the service was strongly advocated. 
Such divisions have heen operating during the year at Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, 
Hamilton, London. Winnipeg, Brandon, Eegina, Moosejaw, Saskatoon, Calgary, 
Edmonton, Vancouver and Victoria. In the women's divisions of the Toronto and 
"Winnipeg offices separate sections were maintained for farm, domestic and professional 
and business workers. In offices where a separate division is not maintained for women 
a special interviewer is usually assigned to this work and special applications and 
order forms for women workers are now in use in all the offices. The total number 
of women placed in regular employment during the year was 33,569. 

During the year the Canadian Council of Immigration of Women for House- 
hold Service, in conjunction with the Department of Immigration, was instrumental 
in bringing out to Canada a considerable number of workers from the United 
Kingdom, who were cared for through a system of hostels. In the majority of cases 
the placement of these women workers was etfected through the local offices of the 
Employment Service. In order to facilitate follow-up work in connection with these 
workers the Employment Service Council of Canada also recommended that all 
records of placements aud replacements of women workers, especially those from 
-overseas, be made available to the superintendent of the local hostel. 



PLACEMENT OK JUNIORS 

Acting upon a recommendation passed by the Employment Service Council of 
■Canada at its first meeting that a junior division be established in the Employment 
Service, the Department of Labour in December, 1919, created the office of Junior 
Employment Specialist. The duties of this officer include the preparation of plans 
for the organization of placement work for juniors and the promotion of these plans 
in co-operation with the Provincial Governments. In July, 1920, at the request of 
the provinces of Manitoba and Saskatchewan, the Junior Employment Specialist 
went to Winnipeg and Regina to confer with provincial employment officials, educa- 
tional authorities and others interested regarding the organization of junior divisions 
in these provinces. Mrs. Eeed, Chief of the Junior Division of the United States 
Employment Service, was present at these conferences, and later visited both Alberta 
and British Columbia to discuss the situation in regard to junior employment work 
with the authorities concerned in these provinces. All the western provinces were 
much interested in the work and the Junior Specialist of the Federal Department of 
Labour was authorized by the province of Manitoba to proceed with a survey of the 
employment of junior workers in Winnipeg under the direction of the Committee on 
Junior Emiiloyment of that city. The report of this survey covering information 
received from over 1,400 industrial establishments and business houses was sub- 
mitted to the Deputy Minister of Education of the province in September, 1920. 

At the second meeting of the Employment Service Council of Canada the com- 
mittee on specialized service recommended that the junior employment survey be 
continued and that all information gained be made available to the other provinces 
in order that these provinces might proceed with the development of Jimior Depart- 
ments upon a sound and tested basis. In October the province of Manitoba author- 
ized the opening of a junior office in Winnipeg and since then the Junior Specialist 
has devoted much of his time to assisting in the organization and work of that office. 

In Calgary, also, junior employment work is receiving attention. At the time 
of writing a survey of opportunities for junior workers in the city is being conducted, 
largely by means of questionnaires forwarded to industrial establishments. A Junior 



94 DEI'ARTIIENT OF LAJSOUJl 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

Branch has reowitly been opened in the employment office and a special officer 
assigned to the -n-nrk. The co-operation of local school authorities has been secured 
and each school principal has been supplied with fonnfi which are forwarded to the 
Junior Branch when a boy or girl is leaving school. 

Provincul and Local Employment Service Councils 

The regulations issued under the Employment Offices Co-ordination Act pro- 
vide for the establishment of provincial and local employment service councils to 
assist in an advisory capacity in the administration of the Employment Service. 
The establishment of these advisory bodies has been endorsed by the Employment 
Service Council of Canada, and the present form of agreement with the provinces 
calls for the organization of a provincial council in each province signing the agree- 
ment and of local councils in connection with the Employment Service in every city 
having a population of 35,000 or over. Legislation providing for the establishment 
of provincial employment service councils has already been enacted in Alberta, 
Manitoba and Ontario. The Employment Service Council of Alberta held its 
organization meeting in February, 1921, and it is expected that councils will be 
organized very soon in the other provinces also. Legislation with regard to the estab- 
lishment of local councils has also been enacted by Alberta and Ontario, and a 
number of such local councils has already been formed throughout Canada. At the 
end of the fiscal year under consideration local employment service councils were 
functioning in connection with the following employment offices: Moncton, Moose 
Jaw, Prince Albert, Begina, Saskatoon, Torkton, Calgary, Edmonton, Lethbridge, 
and Medicine Hat. 

At the meeting of the executive committee of the Employment Service Council 
of Canada the following statement of duties for provincial and local employment 
service councils was drawn up to be submitted to the provincial authorities for con- 
sideration : — 

DUTIES OF PROVINCLiL EMPLOYMENT SERVICE COUNCILS 

1. To make recommendations to the minister of the province with regard 
to general policy in such matters as the number and type of offices to be 
established, the location, premises and equipment of such offices, qualifications 
for positions in the provincial employment service, training of personnel, zoning 
of the province and publicity. 

2. To advise on the organization of the provincial employment service, 
Inclading appointment of persons in charge of local offices, changes in such 
appointments, and generally to promote efficiency in its administration. 

?. To advise on the bringing into or sending out of the province by the 
provincial employment service of any considerable body of labour. 

'I. To secure the co-operation of provincial organizations of employers 
and employees in the use of the Employment Service. 

5. To consider methods and devise plans for preventing and alleviating 
unemployment in the province and to enlist the co-operation of provincial 
organizations of employers and employeee, the provincial authorities and other 
interested persons and organizations in the promotion of such plane. 



inu'ORT OF nil-: dki'lty mimsteu 95 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 

DIJTIUS OF LOCAL EMPLOYMENT SEUVICE COUNCILS 

1. To make recommendations ■with regard to location, premises, alterations 
and equipment of the local employment offices and with regard to the estab- 
lisliment of new divisions. 

2. To advise on the organization of the local office, including appoint- 
ments and changes in staff, the business hours, and in general to promote 
efficiency in its administration. 

3. To advise on the bringing into or sending out of the locality by the 
local employment office of any considerable body of labour. 

4. To secure the co-operation of employers and employees in the use of 
the local office, and to investigate complaints. 

5. To recommend plans for advertising the work of the local office. 

6. To appoint special committees for junior, handicap and professional 
and business work and such other matters as may be deemed advisable. 

7. To consider methods and devise plans for the prevention and allevia- 
tion of unemployment in the locality and to enlist the co-operation of employers 
and employees, the municipal authorities and other interested persons and 
organizations in the promotion of such plans. 

This statement of duties was approved by the minister, who suggested the follow- 
ing addition with regard to the procedure of employment service councils: — 

The recommendations of employment service councils will in general fall in one 
of the following classes: (1) recommendations primarily for the attention of the 
municipal councils or local organizations, (2) the Provincial Governments or pro- 
vincial organizations, (3) the Dominion Government or national organizations. 

Most reoommendations of local employment service councils will fall in class 
(1). Eecommendations of this class should be brought to the attention of the muni- 
cipal government or other local body concerned by the local council direct. Eecom- 
mendations of classes (2) and (3) passed by local councils should be forwarded to the 
employment service council of the province. Eecommendations of class (2) received 
in this way should be considered by the provincial council, co-ordinated with the 
recommendations of other local coimcils in as fair as possible and brought to the 
attention of the Provincial Government or other provincial body concerned with or 
without endorsation or expression of opinion as the provincial counoil may think 
desirable. Eecommendations of class (3) should be forwarded by the provincial council 
for the attention of the Emplovment Service C-ouncil of Canada and the representative 
of the province on the Employment Service Council of Canada should be instructed 
to present the views of the provincial council with regard to such recommendation 
at the next meeting of the national council. 

Eecommendations of class (1) originating with a provincial employment service 
council should be forwarded to the local councils of the province for their considera- 
tion and for their action if approved. The provincial council should bring its own 
recommendations of class (2) to the attention of the Provincial Government or other 
provincial bodies concerned. Eecommendations of class (3) passed by the provincial 
council should be forwarded to the Employment Service Council of Canada as above. 

Eecommendations of classes (1) and (2) passed by the Employment Service Coun- 
cil of Canada should be forwarded to the provincial councils for presentation if approved 
to local councils in the case of class (1) recommendations or to the Provincial Gov- 
ernment or other provincial bodies concerned in the case of class (2) recommendations. 



96 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

The provincial representatives on the Employment Service Council of Canada 
should present to the provincial councils and through them to the local councils the 
views of the national council with regard to such recommendations. The Employment 
Service Council of Canada will brins: its own recommendations of class (3) to the 
attention of the Dominion Government or other Dominion bodies concerned. 

Co-operation with the Civil Service Commission 

A system of co-operation with the Civil Service Commission of Canada in the 
placement of temporary workers in Dominion Government employ was inaugurated 
early in 1921. Formerly, the Commission, with the machinery at its disposal, had 
experienced considerable difficulty and delay in selecting and assigning workers to fill 
temporary vacancies in places other than Ottawa. Under the arrangement now in 
force, temporary vacancies for such workers as letter-carriers, postal clerks, elevator 
men, chauffeurs, garage men and cleaners are notified direct to the local office of the 
Employment Service and the office acts as the agent of the commission in selecting 
the persons required. Persons in localities other than Ottawa applying to the Civil 
Service Commission for temporary positions similar to those noted above are requested 
to register at the local office of the service. As the offices maintain up-to-date lists of 
applicants available for employment, classified by occupations, the labour requirements 
of local Government officers can be satisfied without delay. In filling vacancies of 
this kind the offices are governed by the order of selection prescribed by the commission 
whereby priority of appointment is granted to returned soldiers, to applicants qualified 
for permanent appointment, etc. Lists of such applicants qualified by examination or 
otherwise for positions in the service are forwarded to the local offices from time to 
time by the commission in order that these may receive preference if they signify to 
the office their desire for temporary work. A test of the new procedure was made 
recently at Toronto in the selection of temporary help to substitute during the summer 
vacation in the post office and very satisfactory results have been reported. 



Uxemploy;men't Relief 

The policy of the Dominion Government in regard to emergency relief to meet 
the unemployment situation which developed in Canada towards the close of 1920 was 
announced in a memorandum issued under date of December 24, 1920. Copies of 
this memorandum were forwarded to the premiers of each province, to members of 
Parliament, and to the mayors of every municipality in which employment offices have 
been established under the Employment Offices Co-ordination Act. The memorandum 
urged that the situation should be met to the utmost possible extent by the provision 
of work instead of relief. It stated, however, that if emergency measures became 
necessary by reason of utterly unavoidable shortage of employment, the Federal Gov- 
ernment was willing to co-operate on the following basis: "The organization for 
determining where relief must go and for distributing the same shall be provided by 
the municipal authorities, and in each case before relief is given and as relief is con- 
tinued a certificate must be obtained from the Government Employment Service, 
showing that the applicant cannot be given employment. The general system and 
details and the safeguards adopted must be approved by, or on behalf of, the Federal 
Government. If this is done the Federal Government is willing to contribute in places 
where relief on any substantial scale appears to be necessary one-third of the amount 
actually disbursed on this relief provided the other two-thirds is either paid by the 
municipality, or paid by the municipality and the province jointly." Copies of the form 



REl'OUT OF Tin: DEl'LTY MlMSTKIt 97 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 

to be used in connection with the relief funds, together with a circular containing in- 
structions ns to procedure, accompanied the memorandum. 

Steps along the lines suggested were immediately taken to relieve the situation in 
several municipalities, and during the winter as unemployment became more acute in 
other districts, additional municipalities applied for grants. Up to the time of writing 
the total amount paid to municipalities by the Dominion Government for unemploy- 
ment relief was $431,540.59. 

Of this amount $217,714.59 was paid out in Ontario, payments being made as 
follows: Toronto, $179,291.53; York, $2,444.10; Peterborough, $1,315.73; Owen Sound, 
$224.G3; Etobicoko, $814.27; Oshawa, $911.29; Paris, $37.7s ; Brantford, $810.50; St. 
Catharines, $588.10; Grantham, $25.39; Walkerville, $40.75; Scarborough, $266.27; 
Hamilton, $30,938.25. 

In Manitoba the following disbursements were made: Winnipeg, $57,690.19; 
St. James $1,418.52; Kosser, $358.18; total, $59,466.89. 

The amount paid to municipalities in Saskatchewan was $19,526.16, distributed 
as follows: Moose Jaw, $7,505.10; Saskatoon, $1,480.72; Regina, $10,540.24. 

Disbursements in British Columbia totalled $122,150.90, the following payments 
being made: New Westminster, $112.30; West Kildouan, $999.88; Burnaby, $140; 
Xelson, $150.51; Prince Rupert, $1,936..95; Vancouver, $108,920.14; Cumberland, 
$26.21; Victoria, $1,132.98; District of South Vancouver, $8,737.93. 

In addition $2,176.13 was paid to the municipality of Amherst, X.S. and 
$10,545.02 to the City of Montreal, P.Q. 

The offices of the Employment Service also assisted in a scheme initiated by the 
Department of Soldiers" Civil Re-establishment for the purpose of extending- relief 
to disabled soldiers unable to secure employment. This scheme applied both to former 
members of the forces pensioned for a disability and to members vocationally trained 
under the Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment. Regulations under the 
Order-in-Council authorizing this relief (P. C. 43 of January 10, 1921), required each 
applicant for relief in all towns in which a Government empldynieiit office was operating 
to obtain a certificate from the employment office stating that no suitable employ- 
ment was available. In certain districts in which the Department of Soldiers' Civil 
Re-establishment had no offices in operation, a co-operative arrangement was entered 
into with offices of the Employment Service by which the representative of the de- 
partment engaged in carrying out this scheme of relief was given accommodation in 
the local office of the service. 

Job Axalvsi,? 

At the first meeting of the Employment Service Council of Canada in May, 1919, 
it was recommended that the Department of Labour should furnish each province witii 
a job analysis, giving the description of each occupation with a code word or number 
for each, the qualifications and training necessary and also the disabilities which would 
permit employment in the occupation without serious handicap. Owing to the 
pressure of organization work the Employment Service was unable to give immediate 
attention to this recommendation. Early in 1920, however, the study of methods of 
job anaylsis and experience in this work elsewhere, was begun and an outline of pro- 
cedure was completed in July. At the second meeting of the Employment Service 
Council held in September, 1920, the report of the committee on administration and 
technique commented favourably upon the progress which had been made and urged 
that a complete report on the subject should be issued as soon as ppssible. In Novem- 
ber in connection with field work on job analysis and preparatory to the compilation 
of data for job specifications a "suggested form of job analysis" was prepared. This 
was followed by the drafting of job specifications for domestic workers, copies of 
which have been forwarded to the various employment officers in the service, which 
deal with women workers in order that they may ofFer s.uggestions or criticisms if 

37—7 



98 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

desired. In line -with the recommendations of the Employment Service Council, 
descriptions of occupations in the mining and lumbering industries have been prepared 
and those covering the printing trades are in course of preparation. The latter are 
being undertaken in conjunction with the Technical Education Branch of the Depart- 
ment of Labour. 

COMMERCUL EmPLOTMENT OFFICES 

At the first meeting of the Employment Service Council of Canada, the opinion 
was expressed that commercial employment agencies were retarding rather than pro- 
moting the efficient distribution of labour and that full benefits could not be derived 
from the Government system of employment offices while private agencies continueii 
to exist. The council recommended, therefore, that effort should be directed to the 
elimination of private employment agencies as soon as the laws of the respective 
Provincial Governments permitted. Several of the provinces acted on this recom- 
mendation during the fiscal year ending March 31, 1920. Legislation abolishing 
commercial employment agencies was brought into effect in Manitoba and Saskatche- 
wan in June and in Alberta in Kovember, 1919. In the province of Ontario, legis- 
lation was passed at the 1919 session of the legislature by which the number of com- 
mercial employment agencies in the province was greatly reduced. 

Further progress in the elimination of private employment agencies was made 
during the fiscal year under review. Legislation prohibiting the operation of fee- 
charging employment agencies was put into effect in British Columbia on July 1 and 
in Xova Scotia on October 1, 1920. Further legislation on this subject was enacted 
in British Columbia in March, 1921. The two special features of this recent law are, 
that private agencies placing public school teachers are definitely brought within 
the scope of the act and that all private employment offices acting as hiring 
agencies for employers shall be required to furnish to the general superintendent of tho 
province complete records of their transactions. 

The province of Quebec has enacted legislation for the abolition of commercial 
employment agencies, which empowers the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to order 
the closing of all employment bureaus kept or controlled by individuals, companies 
or other persons in such places as he shall specify. LTnder authority of this legislation, 
the number of licenses issued to private employment agencies in the province of 
Q.uebec has recently been somewhat reduced, and the Federal Department of Labour 
has been advised that several other licenses will be cancelled within a short time. 
Among the offices which the provincial authorities intend to close are several female 
registry offices. In Montreal these offices have until recently been controlled by the 
civic authorities, but the clause in the city charter permitting the licensing of employ- 
ment agencies was struck out at the last session of the legislature, leaving the province 
a clear field for the management of employment bureaus. It is understood that a law 
will shortly be passed in the province of Xew Brunswick making the operation of fee- 
charging agencies illegal. 

At the second meeting of the Employment ' Service Council of Canada held in 
September, 1920, the steps taken by various provinces fince the previous meeting of 
the Council to close all private employment agencies within their boundaries were 
noted with satisfaction, and it was strongly recommended that the provinces in which 
private agencies still existed should take similar action as soon as practicable. 



ULPURT OF Tin: UKI'LTY .U/A 7.V77-.7.' 99 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 



X. REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF TECHNICAL EDUCATION 

Prof. L. W. Gill, Director of Technical Education for Canada, reports as 
follows : — 

Introduction 

The purpose and provisions of the Technical Education Act and the character 
and scope of the education or training which the Federal Government is assisting 
the provinces to develop, were explained in the first annual report. The growth and 
extent of vocational education throughout the Dominion were briefly outlined and it 
was predicted that the next few years would witness a decided development in the 
work. 

The growth of the past year is indicated by the fact that the total amount 
earned by the provinces has increased from $2'73,787.99 to $66'5,161'.ll. Every province 
is now actively engaged in developing a system of vocational training and the pro- 
vinces of Alberta and Ontario are already earning more than their full appropria- 
tions from the federal grant. 

Expenditures from the Federal Grant 

The money available and the amounts earned by the various provinces for work 
done during the fiscal year ended March 31, 1921, are shown in table I. It will be 
noted that the total unexpended balance from the previous year was carried forward. 
Although the provinces of Alberta and Ontario earned the full available amount, 
returns for the last quarter of the fiscal year were not received until after the books 
were closed and grants for work done during the period January to March have been 
charged against the accounts for the current year. The federal, provincial and 
municipal expenditures for the school year on work coming within the scope of the 
Act are giveil in table II. The growth in the work is further indicated by the 
increase in the total expenditures made by the provincial goveriunents. These figures 
show an increase of from $82-6,990.09 to $1,241,243.11, or 50 per cent over the previous 
year. 

Attention is drawn to the fact that these two tables show the expenditures 
incurred for work done during the past fiscal year, not the actual payments made. 
Returns are made half yearly and payments from the federal and provincial funds 
are not made for several months after the work is performed, consequently payments 
from the federal grant cover work done during the last half oT the previous year 
and the first half of the year reported. Payments during the fiscal year ended March 
31, 1921, were $580,635.43, and for the previous year $196,500.49. 

Vocational Schools in the Dominion 

The nature and extent of the work being carried on by each province is indicated 
by table III. The total number of schools, 262, does not represent the number of 
school buildings devoted exclusively to vocational education. Buildings in which 
both day and evening clases are conducted are counted as two separate schools, and 
in Ontario the commercial classes are regarded as separate schools whether con- 
ducted in the same building as the industrial classes or not. The two branches of 
the work have different staffs and are operated separately. Where classes under one 
principal are conducted in two or more buildings the group of classes is counted as 
one school. 

37— 7J 



100 DEPARniEKT OF LABOUR 

12 GEORGE V, A. 1922 

The number of day schools hag increased from 41 to 69 or 6o-4 per cent over the 
previous year, and the evening schools from 127 to 193 or 52 per cent. A cor- 
responding increase has taken place in the numbers of teachers and pupils enrolled, 
but for some of the provinces the figures for these columns have been compiled from 
incomplete returns. 

Policy of the Departjiest 

Owing to the different methods and systems of conducting the work in the 
various provinces, it has been found as yet impossible to obtain uniform reports of 
the work done and expenditures made. The director is endeavouring to make satis- 
factory arrangements with all of tlie provinces which will enable him to present com- 
plete figures showing the extent and nature of the work being done in every province 
during the same period of time. 

In administering the provisions and requirements of the Technical Education 
Act the following policy has been adopted : — 

1. To accept the work already done by each province and to co-operate with the 
provincial officials in developing the system of education already established. By 
this procedure, the work in the various provinces may be gradually unified and 
placed on the most efficient basis. 

2. To give advice freely, but only when solicited. 

V>. To direct the attention of the provinces to the importance of training for 
citizenship as well as for employment. 

4. To cultivate a spirit of good-will and mutual confidence not only between the 
department and the province, but also between the provinces, to the end that there 
may be a national co-operation in educational effort. 

o. To secure through every possible agency the continued sympathy and 
eo-oporatioii of mir industrial and labour organizations. 

NaTIONAI, t'dXFKRKNCE O.V TECHNICAL KlH'CATIO.V 

111 OrtiiliiT. ]!>20, the leading representatives of the departments of education 
in the provinces met together in Ottawa to discuss the following questions in their 
relation to vocational education: (1) Teacher training, (2) Prevocational classes 
and vocati<inal guidance, (3) Courses of study, (4) Te-xt-books, (5) Condition for 
entrance to technical classes, (G) Length of school day, (7) Length of school year, 
(8) Educational reports, method of preparing, (9) General supply of teachers. The 
director was appointed secretary of the conference and has issued a complete report 
of the proceedings.* A copy of the nine resolutions adopted is presented in appendix 1. 

Following the conference seven of the nine provinces signified their willingness 
to co-operate in the establishment of a central teacher training institute for the 
Dominion, but the Federal Government considered that the additional expenditures 
involved were not warranted at the present time. Xo important developments have 
yet resulted from the conference, but it has helped to promote national co-operation 
in educational efforts. 

Appointment of Assistant to the Dihectou 

In order to xjroperly carry out the provisions of the Act it is essential that the 
director should be familiar with the work in every province and that he should keep 
in close touch with all new developments in vocational education. This necessitates 
considerable travelling and much work which is not directly connected with the 

•Bulletin No. 1. Vocational Education Series. Proceedings of the First National Confer- 
-^ '» ence on Technical Education. 






UEVnin OF THE DEI'LTV MIM.SlElt 101 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 37 

distribution of the federal grant. It was found that tlie direetor could not alone 
attend to all the teehnical work involved, and in November, 19-20, Mr. A. \V. Craw- 
ford was appointed by the (^ivil Service (Commission to a-'^^'ist the director. 

Cll MiAf'TKI! OK Till'. WoUK BeINT, DoNK 

On his visits to the i)rovinces the director has found that the character and 
quality of the work being done is not entirely satisfactory. If a reasonable standard 
of efficiency were demanded before payments of federal money were made, about 
one-half of the work which is now receiving a benefit from the grant would be 
excluded. The principal reason for this lack of efficiency is that none of the provinces 
have provided adequate training facilities for teachers. The province of Xew Bruns- 
wick conducts a summer school for those already engaged in the work and teachere 
are also given financial assistance to enable them to attend training schools in the 
United States; Ontario provides special lectures for those teachers who have not 
had previous teacher training and ha.« planned to conduct a summer school this year; 
but no provision has been made for training new teachers specially for this work. 
The necessity for strict economy in all expenditures of public money is perhaps the 
chief reason for the failure of the provinces to provide adequate training for both 
teachers and pupils. Until more money is available for this work, it will be impos- 
sible to meet the rapidly growing demands of the public for efficient industrial, 
commercial and agricultural training. There is much room for improvement in both 
the character of the work performed and the methods of providing the desired 
training, but the progress and developments of the past year show that the provinces 
fully realize the importance of the work and are earnestly striving to develop it along 
efficient and practical lines. 

iMlMltTANT DF.Vfn.Ol'MKNTS DritlNG TilK YkAR 

The establishment of the Agricultural and Technical High School in Charlotte- 
town, P.E.I., in November, 1920, marked the first step in the development of vocational 
education in that province. The direetor took an active part in the work of organiz- 
ing this school and in arranging the courses of study so that both the agricultural 
and industrial interests would receive adequate attention. 

The province of Nova Scotia has resumed its correspondence department and is 
preparing for extensive work among the miners of that province. 

The inauguration of itinerant classes for fishermen is an important development 
of the work in New Brunswick. The travelling instructor is provided with a motion- 
picture projector, charts, engine parts and all the necessary class equipment for con- 
ducting a practical course in gas engine work, and has given valuable instruction to 
265 fishermen and others along the coast. 

The resignation of Mr. Machevas, Director of Technical Education for Quebec, 
has retarded development in that province, but two fine buildings have been erected 
in Three Rivers and Hull and ne